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Not Even In, With, and Under


As previously posted, the primary offense of the English Reformers was their denial of the real presence of Christ in the Lord’s Supper. They were responding, of course, to the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation. Following that post, I explained why the Lutheran doctrine of consubstantiation must also be rejected. It was interesting, then, to encounter Archbishop John Hooper rejecting the Lutheran language (without so identifying it) also. The following is from Hooper’s A Brief and Clear Confession of the Christian Faith.

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I believe that all this Sacrament consisteth in the use thereof: so that without the right use the bread and wine in nothing differ from other common bread and wine, that is commonly used: and, therefore, I do not believe that the body of Christ can be contained, hid, or inclosed in the bread, under the bread, or with the bread; neither the blood in the wine, under the wine, or with the wine. But I believe and confess the very body of Christ to be in heaven, on the right hand of the Father (as before we have said), and that always and as often as we use this bread and wine according to the ordinance and institution of Christ, we do verily and indeed receive His body and blood.

. . .

I believe that this receiving is not done carnally or bodily, but spiritually, through a true and lively faith; that is to say, the body and blood of Christ are not given to the mouth and belly, for the nourishing of the body, but unto our faith, for the nourishing of the spirit and inward man unto eternal life. And for that cause we have no need that Christ should come from heaven to us, but that we should ascend unto Him, lifting up our hearts through a lively faith on high, unto the right hand of the Father, where Christ sitteth, from whence we wait for our redemption.

—in J. C. Ryle, Light from Old Times (Banner of Truth, 2015), 95–96.



Posted 2017·05·17 by David Kjos
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Posted in: Church History · J C Ryle · Light from Old Times · Lord’s Table · Lutheranism

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