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The Benefit of the Doubt


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[Love] . . . believes all things . . . —1 Corinthians 13:7

Love is not ignorant or naïve, but when in doubt, it gives the benefit of that doubt. Furthermore, the one who loves would rather take the chance of being wronged than wrong another (1 Corinthians 6:7).

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Love believeth all things.—not that the Christian knowingly and willingly allows himself to be imposed upon—not that he divests himself of prudence and judgment, that he may be the more easily taken advantage of—not that he unlearns the way of distinguishing black from white. What then? He requires here, as I have already said, simplicity and kindness in judging of things; and he declares that these are the invariable accompaniments of love. The consequence will be, that a Christian man will reckon it better to be imposed upon by his own kindness and easy temper, than to wrong his brother by an unfriendly suspicion.

Calvin’s Commentaries Volume XX, Commentary on the Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians (Baker Books, 2009), 1:425.



Posted 2019·10·10 by David Kjos
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Posted in: 1 Corinthians · Calvin’s Commentaries: 1 Corinthians · John Calvin

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