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Psalms

(43 posts)

A Meditation on Psalm 42

Monday··2008·08·04
O God, I thirst for you; I long to be in your presence. Surely, you have not forgotten me! Lift up my downcast soul; still the turmoil within me. Let the roar of your waterfalls thunder in my ears; and let me be immersed in you as your waves break over me. I praise you for your steadfast love, and the song you have given me— a prayer to you, the God of my life. Praise you, O Lord, my rock, my salvation, my God.

Psalm 1: The Blessed Man

Monday··2009·02·02
How blessed is the man who does not walk in the " />counsel of the wicked, Nor stand in the path of sinners, Nor sit in the seat of scoffers! 2 But his delight is in the law of the Lord, And in His law he meditates day and night. 3 He will be like a tree firmly planted by streams of water, Which yields its fruit in its season And its leaf does not wither; And in whatever he does, he prospers. 4 The wicked are not so, But they are like chaff which the wind drives away. 5 Therefore the wicked will not stand in the judgment, Nor sinners in the assembly of the righteous. 6 For the Lord knows the way of the righteous, But the way of the wicked will perish. The Psalm begins with a description of the general state of the righteous: blessed. Thomas Watson wrote, “This Psalm carries blessedness in the frontispiece; it begins where we all hope to end . . .” Now, one might think that this blessedness is consequential to the traits of the righteous described in the verses that follow. Certainly, there are benefits that proceed from godly living; but I think it is better to see those traits as the blessings themselves. To see righteousness as the cause of blessedness is to forget that the only righteousness we possess is a righteousness that is not our own. The Psalm then contrasts the righteous and the wicked. The wicked and righteous are separated, first ethically, and then judicially.* Ethical Separation The Righteous The righteous man does not keep company with the wicked. This is not to say that he has no association with them. It is to say that he does not look to them for wisdom (walk in the counsel), and that they are not his friends. He may be a friend, to them, in the same sense that Jesus was called a “friend of tax collectors and sinners” (Matthew 11:19; Luke 7:34), but he does not look to them for friendship (James 4:4). “Walk,” “sit,” “stand” may be seen as a progression from casual friendship to finally settling in and becoming one of them. The righteous man delights in God’s law. This is not to say that he is legalistically obsessed with rules and regulations. He simply loves God and wants to know him. He is driven by a desire to know God, and takes great pleasure in knowing and pleasing him. He loves God and his Word so much that it is always on his mind (meditates day and night). The righteous man is planted. He did not spring up wild, or of his own accord. He was intentionally planted, and nourished by streams of water. He will not be moved, and he will receive all the nourishment he needs for healthy life and growth. Consequently, he will bear the fruit that is expected (in its season) of a healthy, thriving tree. We are also reminded that the “streams of water” supplied by our Lord are “living water.” Like the living water promised by Jesus (John 4:7–14; 7:37–38), its effect is permanently life-giving’’its leaf does not wither.” The result is that “in whatever he does, he prospers.” This is not a reference to anything so superficial as physical or material health and prosperity. Success for the Christian is measured by one result only: that he bears good fruit and so displays the glory of God. The Wicked The wicked are not so. After nine lines describing the righteous and his fruit, the poet emphasizes the stark contrast between the righteous and the wicked by describing the wicked in only two. Theologians often define sins into two categories, sins of commission, and sins of omission. These are useful categories, but here we are reminded that all sins are sins of omission. All sin is simply not being righteous, or, as Question 14 of the Westminster Shorter Catechism states, “Sin is any want of conformity unto, or transgression of, the law of God.” So after a more lengthy description of the righteous, it is enough to state simply, “The wicked are not so.” Consequently, while the righteous “yields fruit,” “does not wither,” and “prospers,” the wicked “are like the chaff which the wind drives away.” Chaff is the husks of grain, bits of straw, and other debris that survive the initial harvesting process. But it is not grain, which contains the germ of life. It is dead and useless, and is blown away during the grain cleaning process, to go back into the ground and rot. Judicial Separation The Wicked The wicked will not stand in the judgment. The wicked will be judged. Their true character, which is not always discernible to us, is never hidden from God. It will will be brought to light, and a “guilty” verdict will be rendered. Sinners will not stand in the congregation of the righteous. the wicked will be separated from the righteous. Matthew 13, Parable of the Wheat and Tares 24 Jesus presented another parable to them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field. 25 But while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat, and went away. 26 But when the wheat sprouted and bore grain, then the tares became evident also. 27 The slaves of the landowner came and said to him, ‘Sir, did you not sow good seed in your field? How then does it have tares?’ 28 And he said to them, ‘An enemy has done this!’ The slaves said to him, ‘Do you want us, then, to go and gather them up?’ 29 But he said, ‘No; for while you are gathering up the tares, you may uproot the wheat with them. 30 Allow both to grow together until the harvest; and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers, “First gather up the tares and bind them in bundles to burn them up; but gather the wheat into my barn.”’” The way of the wicked will perish. They will be burned as the tares in the preceding parable. The Righteous The Lord knows the way of the righteous. This time, it is the righteous of whom little is said, only one line for three describing the fate of the wicked. But it is not really so little. “The Lord knows” is a phrase that is loaded with meaning. Being “known” by the Lord indicates a relationship of profound intimacy, love, and trust. It signifies sonship, having been adopted and made a joint heir with Jesus to eternal life. Being known by the Lord makes all the difference. There are no more fearful words than the sentence “I never knew you” from the mouth of Jesus. * Outline adapted from the MacArthur Study Bible.

He Laughs, He Judges

Tuesday··2009·04·07
Im a bit short of time today, have been for the past week, so Im not prepared for the scheduled Theology Proper post today. This post by Tim Challies got me thinking about the fact that many Christians seem to do an awful lot of hand-wringing over the state of the world and the behavior of pagans. Thinking of that brought Psalm 2 to mind. Read Tims post, read Psalm 2, and consider how our knowledge of God and his sovereign rule should affect our thinking on these things. Psalm 2 Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his anointed, saying, Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us. He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision. Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure. Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. I will declare the decree: the Lord hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession. Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel. Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.

Hymns of My Youth: The Lord’s My Shepherd

Saturday··2011·04·02 · 1 Comments
Psalm 23    The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.    He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.    He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.    Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.    Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.    Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever. As far as I can recall, I’ve never sung this rendition of Psalm 23, but I should have, it’s in the book, and the tune is familiar, so I’m including it here. 207 The Lord’s My Shepherd, I’ll Not Want The Lord’s my Shepherd, I’ll not want; He makes me down to lie In pastures green, He leadeth me The quiet waters by. My soul He doth restore again; And me to walk doth make Within the paths of righteousness, E’en for His own Name’s sake. Yea, though I walk in death’s dark vale, Yet will I fear no ill; For Thou art with me, and Thy rod And staff me comfort still. A table Thou prepares me In presence of my foes; My head Thou dost anoint with oil, And my cup o’erflows. Thy lovingkindness all my days Shall surely follow me; And in God’s house forevermore My dwelling place shall be. —The Concordia Hymnal (Augsburg Publishing House, 1960). The Concordia tune is Dundee, also used with My God! How Wonderful Thou Art and According to Thy Gracious Word. And the tune you may find more familiar, Crimond:

WLC Q14: Psalm 33:69

Wednesday··2011·04·06
Originally posted at The Calvinist GadflyQ. 14. How does God execute his decrees? A. God executes his decrees in the works of creation and providence, according to his infallible foreknowledge, and the free and immutable counsel of his own will. By the word of the Lord the heavens were made, And by the breath of His mouth all their host. He gathers the waters of the sea together as a heap; He lays up the deeps in storehouses. Let all the earth fear the Lord. Let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of Him. For He spoke, and it was done; He commanded, and it stood fast. Psalm 33:69 I have built houseswhole houses, from a bare hole in the ground to a turn-key home. Ive formed and poured the footings down in the ground, and set forms on top of them and poured the basement walls. Ive bolted plates down on top of those walls and nailed the floor joists to them. Ive screwed the sub-floor to the joists, and framed walls on top of them. Ive set the rafters, sheeted the roof and walls, installed the windows and doors, and shingled, sided, and soffited the shell of the house. Then, following the electrician and plummer, Ive gone inside, insulated the exterior walls and hung the drywall. Ive installed the kitchen and bathroom cabinets and countertops, hung the interior doors, and trimmed the whole works. Impressive? Not really. On every job, I was taking orders, along with at least two others. Every wall I raised had another man at the other end, and maybe a couple in the middle. Lumber was measured and cut, and nails, screws, and glue held it all together. Thousands of dollars worth of tools and who-knows-how-many kilowatts of electricity got the job done. All that, plus hundreds of man-hours, put another family in a house. Sometimes, when my back and feet were tired and hurting, I wished I could be God for a day. I wished I could show up on the job site one morning and say to my boss, Watch this, and to the dirt, Let there be a house. I reckon I could have gotten a pretty good raise out of that. Thats how God executes his decrees. From creation to the carrying out of his will for the creation, he executes his decrees by the sheer power of his will. He speaks, and it is done; he commands, and it stands fast. Let them praise the name of the Lord: for he commanded, and they were created. Psalm 148:5 Get your own copy of The Westminster Confession of Faith and Catechisms here.

WLC Q16: Psalm 103:20

Wednesday··2011·04·27
Q. 16. How did God create angels? A. God created all the angels spirits, immortal, holy, excelling in knowledge, mighty in power, to execute his commandments, and to praise his name, yet subject to change. Bless the Lord, ye his angels, that excel in strength, that do his commandments, hearkening unto the voice of his word. ���Psalm 103:20 Bless the Lord, ye his angels, that excel in strength.��� Finding his work of praise growing upon his hands, he calls upon ���the firstborn sons of light��� to speak the praises of the Lord, as well they may, for as Milton says, they best can tell. Dwelling nearer to that prepared throne than we as yet have leave to climb, they see in nearer vision the glory which we would adore. To them is given an exceeding might of intellect, and voice, and force which they delight to use in sacred services for him; let them now turn all their strength into that solemn song which we would send up to the third heaven. To him who gave angelic strength let all angelic strength be given. They are his angels, and therefore they are not loth to ring out his praises. ���That do his commandments, hearkening unto the voice of his word.��� We are bidden to do these commandments, and alas we fail; let those unfallen spirits, whose bliss it is never to have transgressed, give to the Lord the glory of their holiness. They hearken for yet more commands, obeying as much by reverent listening as by energetic action, and in this they teach us how the heavenly will should evermore be done; yet even for this surpassing excellence let them take no praise, but render all to him who has made and kept them what they are. O that we could hear them chant the high praises of God, as did the shepherds on that greatest of all birth nights��� ���When such music sweet  Their hearts and ears did greet  As never was by mortal finger struck;  Divinely-warbled voice  Answering the stringed noise,  As well their souls in blissful rapture took:  The air, such pleasure loth to lose,  With thousand echoes still prolongs each heavenly close.���    Our glad heart anticipates the hour when we shall hear them ���harping in loud and solemn guise,��� and all to the sole praise of God. ���Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David (Hendrickson, 1988). Get your own copy of The Westminster Confession of Faith and Catechisms here.

WLC Q4: Psalm 12:6

Monday··2011·05·16
Q. 4. How does it appear that the Scriptures are the Word of God? A. The Scriptures manifest themselves to be the Word of God, by their majesty and purity; by the consent of all the parts, and the scope of the whole, which is to give all glory to God; by their light and power to convince and convert sinners, to comfort and build up believers unto salvation: but the Spirit of God bearing witness by and with the Scriptures in the heart of man, is alone able fully to persuade it that they are the very Word of God. The words of the Lord are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times. Psalm 12:6 The Psalmist now declares, that God is sure, faithful, and steadfast in his promises. But the insertion by the way of this commendation of the word of God would be to no purpose, if he had not first called himself, and other believers, to meditate on Gods promises in their afflictions. Accordingly, the order of the Psalmist is to be attended to, namely, that, after telling us how God gives to his servants the hope of speedy deliverance, even in their deepest distresses, he now adds, to support their faith and hope, that God promises nothing in vain, or for the purpose of disappointing man. This, at first sight, seems a matter of small importance; but if any person consider more closely and attentively how prone the minds of men are to distrust and ungodly doubtings, he will easily perceive how requisite it is for our faith to be supported by this assurance, that God is not deceitful, that he does not delude or beguile us with empty words, and that he does not magnify beyond all measure either his power or his goodness, but that whatever he promises in word he will perform in deed. There is no man, it is true, who will not frankly confess that he entertains the same conviction which David here records, that the words of Jehovah are pure; but those who while lying in the shade and living at their ease liberally extol by their praises the truth of Gods word, when they come to struggle with adversity in good earnest, although they may not venture openly to pour forth blasphemies against God, often charge him with not keeping his word. Whenever he delays his assistance, we call in question his fidelity to his promises and murmur just as if he had deceived us. There is no truth which is more generally received among men than that God is true; but there are few who frankly give him credit for this when they are in adversity. It is, therefore, highly necessary for us to cut off the occasion of our distrust; and whenever any doubt respecting the faithfulness of Gods promises steals in upon us, we ought immediately to lift up against it this shield, that the words of the Lord are pure. John Calvin, Calvins Commentaries Volume IV, Commentary on the Book of Psalms, Volume I (Baker Books, 2009), 176177. Get your own copy of The Westminster Confession of Faith and Catechisms here.

Lords Day 27, 2011

Sunday··2011·07·03
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Hymn 57. (c. m.) Original sin. Rom. v. 12, &c.; Psa. li. 5; Job xiv. 4. Isaac Watts (1674-1748) Backward with humble shame we look On our original; How is our nature dashd and broke In our first fathers fall! To all thats good averse and blind, But prone to all thats ill What dreadful darkness veils our mind! How obstinate our will! [Conceived in sin, O wretched state! Before we draw our breath The first young pulse begins to beat Iniquity and death. How strong in our degenrate blood The old corruption reigns, And, mingling with the crooked flood, Wanders through all our veins.] [Wild and unwholesome as the root Will all the branches be; How can we hope for living fruit From such a deadly tree? What mortal power from things unclean Can pure productions bring? Who can command a vital stream From an infected spring?] Yet, mighty God! thy wondrous love Can make our nature clean, While Christ and grace prevail above The tempter, death, and sin. The second Adam shall restore The ruins of the first; Hosannah to that sovereign power That new-creates our dust! from The Psalms & Hymns of Isaac Watts. Hymns and Spiritual Songs. Book I: Collected from the Holy Scriptures (Soli Deo Gloria, 1997). And just as they did not see fit to acknowledge God any longer . . . Romans 1:28 They quickly forgot His works . . . Psalm 106:13 God has well remembered man; remembers him every day. God might easily forget man; he is so insignificant, worthless, unloveable. But He does not. He has never done so. This world, evil as it is, has been truly, what one has called it, His well-beloved world,His well-remembered creation. Each of us, however poor, however sinful, is a fragment of that world, that race which He has never forgotten: Thou shalt not be forgotten of me. Each moments mercies are tokens of the divine mindfulness. He ever retains us in His knowledge and memory. God desires to be remembered by man. He has taken unspeakable pains to keep Himself before His creatures, so as to make forgetfulness on their part the greatest of all impossibilities. In everything that God has set before our eyes or ears, He says, Remember me. In every star, every flower, every mountain, every stream,in every joy, every comfort, every blessing of daily life,God says, Remember me. How affecting this desire of God to be remembered by man! Yet how has man responded to it? We shall see. The worlds history, and Israels history not less, have shewn how Gods wish to be kept in affectionate remembrance by the creatures He has made has been met. They gave me hatred for my love. They did not like to retain Him in their knowledge. It is not, however, merely a deity, a divine being, that is to be remembered. It is the one living and true God. Every departure from this is idolatry and dishonour. This true God wishes to be remembered, (1.) Reverently. He is great and glorious; to be had in reverence of all creature hood. Reverence and godly fear are His due. (2.) Confidingly. His character is such that He deserves to be trusted. Trustful, childlike remembrance, is what He expects of us. (3.) Joyfully. Not by constraint, or through terror, or hope of profit; but with the full and happy heart. (4.) Lovingly. We love Him because He first loved us. Loving remembrance He would fain have. Nothing less will do. (5.) Steadfastly. Not by fits and starts; at certain devotional seasons, but always. Perpetual remembrance is what God asks,everlasting remembrance. This God, whose name is Jehovah, is worthy to be remembered, He is so infinitely glorious, and good, and great, and loveable. The wonder is, how one so great should ever for a moment be forgotten. That He should forget us, so insignificant, would not be surprising; but that we should forget Him, so great and mighty, is inconceivably marvelous. We may suppose a creature, an atom of the dust, sitting alone and admiring this great Being, and saying, He may not think of me, or notice me, who am such a grain of sand, but I cannot help continually thinking of Him, looking up to Him, praising Him, loving Him, whether He cares for me or not; whether I am overlooked or not,if He will only allow me thus to praise and love. But can we suppose the opposite? the worm of the earth never thinking of this great God at all, and yet this God continually thinking of Him! Yet man forgets God! He hears of Him, and then forgets Him. He sees His works, and then forgets Him. He acknowledges deliverances, and then forgets Him. Thus it is that man deals with God. For his fellow men mans memory serves him well, but towards God it is utterly treacherous. Israel is frequently charged with such things as these: (1.) They forgot His words. All that He had spoken, in grace or righteousness, as warning or as love, they forgot. His words were to them as idle tales. Thus we treat our God. (2.) They forgot His works. Miracle on miracle of the most stupendous kind did He for Israel, in Egypt and in the desert, as if never wearied with blessing them, yet the work was no sooner done than it was out of mind. They sang His praise, and then forgot His works. (3.) They forgot Himself. Yes, Himself! Their God, their Redeemer, their Rock, their Strength! They thrust Him out of their thoughts and memories. He and they were to live apart; to have no intercourse with each other. They were to live in His world, and forget Himself; to enjoy His gifts, but not Himself; to breathe His air, bask in His sunshine, drink His rivers, climb His mountains, sail over His wide sea in storm or calm, and forget Himself? They did not like to retain God in their knowledge. Forgetfulness of God is Gods charge against His creatures. He does not exaggerate their guilt, or bring out into view the gross and hideous crimes of the race. He simply says, You have forgotten me. That is enough. My people have forgotten me. It is they who forget God that are turned into hell. This may seem to some a small sin, a negative evil, a sin of omission; but God places it in the foreground of iniquity. Consider this ye that forget God, lest I tear you in pieces when none can deliver (Psalm 50:22). God lays great stress upon remembering Him and His works. Often did He use that word to Israel, Remember. Remember the way that the Lord led thee. Remember the commandments of the Lord. Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy. Remember thy Creator. In the New Testament the words of the Lord himself must occur to every one, This do in remembrance of me; amid the response of the church, We will remember Thy love more than wine. Forget not, O man, the God that made thee. He has given thee no cause to forget Him. He ever keeps thee in mind; keep Him in mind. Amid all thy forgetfulness let not Him be forgotten. Amid all thy remembrances let Him be ever uppermost. His remembrance will be joy and peace, fragrance, and refreshment, and strength. Retain Him in thy knowledge; root Him in thy memory; fix Him in thy heart forever. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Hymns of My Youth II: O God, Our Help

Saturday··2011·09·24
Lord, thou hast been our dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God. Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men. For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night. Thou carriest them away as with a flood; they are as a sleep: in the morning they are like grass which groweth up. —Psalm 100:1–5 Isaac Watts originally subtitled this, Psalm 90 Part 1, his paraphrase of Psalm 90:1–5, Man frail, and God eternal. O God, Our Help in Ages Past O God,* our help in ages past, Our hope for years to come, Our shelter from the stormy blast, And our eternal home. Under the shadow of thy throne Thy saints have dwelt secure; Sufficient is thine arm alone, And our defense is sure. Before the hills in order stood, Or earth received her frame, From everlasting thou art God, To endless years the same. Time, like an ever-rolling stream, Bears all its sons away; They fly, forgotten, as a dream Dies at the opening day. Our God, our help in ages past, Our hope for years to come, Be thou our guide while life shall last,† And our eternal home. —Great Hymns of the Faith (Zondervan, 1968). * Originally “Our God.” † Originally “Be thou our guard while troubles last.”

Remorse vs. Repentance

Tuesday··2011·11·08
Cast me not away from thy presence; and take not thy holy spirit from me. —Psalm 51:11 Martyn Lloyd-Jones on the nature of genuine repentance, as seen in Psalm 51: I do not hesitate to assert that this is perhaps the most subtle and delicate test as to whether we have repented, or where we are: our attitude towards God. Have you noticed it in the psalm? The one against whom David has sinned is God, and yet the one he desires above all is God. That is the difference between remorse and repentance. The man who has not repented, but who is only experiencing remorse, when he realizes he has done something against God, avoids God. . . . The man who has not been dealt with by the Spirit of God and has not been convinced and convicted, tries to get away from God, to avoid him at all costs. He does not think, he does not read the Bible, he does not pray; he does everything he can not to think about these things. But the extraordinary thing about the man who is convicted of sin by the Holy Spirit is that though he knows he has sinned against God, it is God he wants—“Be merciful to me, O God.” He wants to be with God—that is the peculiar paradox of repentance, wanting the one I have offended! —Martyn Lloyd-Jones, cited in A Tale of Two Sons (Thomas Nelson, 2008), 97–98.

A Trio of Mercies

Tuesday··2011·12·06
But thou, O Lord, art a shield for me; my glory, and the lifter up of mine head. ���Psalm 3:3 Here David avows his confidence in God. ���Thou, O Lord, art a shield for me.��� The word in the original signifies more than a shield; it means a buckler round about, a protection which shall surround a man entirely, a shield above, beneath, around, without and within. Oh! what a shield is God for his people! He wards off the fiery darts of Satan from beneath, and the storms of trials from above, while, at the same instant, he speaks peace to the tempest within the breast. Thou art ���my glory.��� David knew that though he was driven from his capital in contempt and scorn, he should yet return in triumph, and by faith he looks upon God as honouring and glorifying him. O for grace to see our future glory amid present shame! Indeed, there is a present glory in our afflictions, if we could but discern it; for it is no mean thing to have fellowship with Christ in his sufferings. David was honoured when he made the ascent of Olivet, weeping, with his head covered; for he was in all this made like unto his Lord. May we learn, in this respect, to glory in tribulations also! ���And the lifter up of mine head������thou shalt yet exalt me. Though I hang my head in sorrow, I shall very soon lift it up in joy and thanksgiving. What a divine trio of mercies is contained in this verse!���defence for the defenceless, glory for the despised, and joy for the comfortless. Verily we may well say, ���there is none like the God of Jeshurun.��� ���Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David (Hendrickson, 1988).

Lord’s Day 14, 2012

Sunday··2012·04·01
When the Lord’s Day falls on April 1st: ‘The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God.’ And this he does because he is a fool. Being a fool he speaks according to his nature; being a great fool he meddles with a great subject, and comes to a wild conclusion. The atheist is, morally as well as mentally, a fool, a fool in the heart as well as in the head; a fool in morals as well as in philosophy. With the denial of God as a starting point, we may well conclude that the fool’s progress is a rapid, riotous, raving, ruinous one. He who begins at impiety is ready for anything. ‘No God,’, being interpreted, means no law, no order, no restraint to lust, no limit to passion. Who but a fool would be of this mind? What a Bedlam, or rather what an Aceldama, would the world become if such lawless principles came to be universal! He who heartily entertains an irreligious spirit, and follows it out to its legitimate issues is a son of Belial, dangerous to the commonwealth, irrational, and despicable. Every natural man is, more or less a denier of God. Practical atheism is the religion of the race. ‘Corrupt are they.’ They are rotten. It is idle to compliment them as sincere doubters, and amiable thinkers—they are putrid. There is too much dainty dealing nowadays with atheism; it is not a harmless error, it is an offensive, putrid sin, and righteous men should look upon it in that light. All men being more or less atheistic in spirit, are also in that degree corrupt; their heart is foul, their moral nature is decayed. ‘And have done abominable iniquity.’ Bad principles soon lead to bad lives. One does not find virtue promoted by the example of your Voltaires and Tom Paines. Those who talk so abominably as to deny their Maker will act abominably when it serves their turn. It is the abounding denial and forgetfulness of God among men which is the source of the unrighteousness and crime which we see around us. If all men are not outwardly vicious it is to be accounted for by the power of other and better principles, but left to itself the ‘No God’ spirit so universal in mankind would produce nothing but the most loathsome actions. ‘There is none that doeth good.’ The one typical fool is reproduced in the whole race; without a single exception men have forgotten the right way. This accusation twice made in the Psalm, and repeated a third time by the inspired apostle Paul, is an indictment most solemn and sweeping, but he who makes it cannot err, he knows what is in man; neither will he lay more to man’s charge than he can prove. —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David [Read the full commentary on Psalm 53 at the Spurgeon Archive].

Lords Day 24, 2012

Sunday··2012·06·10
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord! O Lord, hear my voice! Let your ears be attentive to the voice of my pleas for mercy! If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? But with you there is forgiveness, that you may be feared. I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in his word I hope; my soul waits for the Lord more than watchmen for the morning, more than watchmen for the morning. O Israel, hope in the Lord! For with the Lord there is steadfast love, and with him is plentiful redemption. And he will redeem Israel from all his iniquities. Psalm 130 Petitionary Hymns Poem XLI. For Pardon. Augustus Toplady (17401778) Shouldst thou be strict to mark our faults, Who could acquitted be? Who, unrenewed, could stand the search, Or bear the scrutiny? Lord, at thy feet I meekly fall, Held in contritions chain: Thy gracious hand that cast me down, Shall raise me up again. O speak the word, thy servant hears, Pronounce me pardond now: Lord, I believe, increase my faith, And let me know thee too. Thou only, Saviour, hast the key, Unlock the prison door! Tho yet I cannot fly to thee, Ill send my heart before. The blood of sprinkling now apply, And that shall make me clean; Weigh not my worthless works, O Lord, But O forgive my sin! Take now away whateer obstructs Thine intercourse with me: And may I cheerfully leave all I have, to follow thee! The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

A Father of the Fatherless

Friday··2012·06·15
A word of comfort for families who have no father to honor on the coming Sunday: Father of the fatherless and protector of widows is God in his holy habitation. Psalm 68:5

Divine Sovereignty in Psalms

Tuesday··2012·08·21
God reigns supreme in the heavens, and His plans never change from one generation to the next. From everlasting to everlasting, His eternal counsel remains the same: The counsel of the Lord stands forever, the plans of his heart to all generations. Psalm 33:11 In this verse, David refers to the counsel of the Lord, which is the eternal deliberation and decree of God, formed in eternity past, by which He made the irrevocable choice of His all-wise will. No matter what man may attempt, the eternal counsel of the Lord will be sustained unwaveringly from one generation to the next. In fact, nothing that any being can do will alter or subvert it. Gods divine purposes remain immutable and unalterable from age to age. Commenting on this text, Albert Barnes writes, There can be no superior counsel or will to change it, as is the case with the plans of men; and no purposes of any beings inferior to himselfangels, men, or devilscan affect, defeat, or modify His eternal plans. No changes in human affairs can impede His plans; no opposition can defeat them; no progress can supersede them. . . . The things which he has designed, or which He intends shall be accomplished. . . . The plans of God are not changed by the passing off of one generation and the coming on of another; by new dynasties of kings, or by the revolutions that may occur in states and empires. All of human history moves forward toward its divinely appointed end under the absolute control of God. Steve Lawson, Foundations of Grace (Reformation Trust, 2006), 136.

Radical Depravity in Psalms

Wednesday··2012·08·22
The unconverted are inwardly corrupt, a condition that causes them to commit deeds of sin continually. Because of this inward evil bent, they fail to seek after God: They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds, there is none who does good. The Lord looks down from heaven on the children of man, to see if there are any who understand, who seek after God. They have all turned aside; together they have become corrupt; there is none who does good, not even one. Psalm 14:1b3 In these verses, the psalmist records the Lords estimation of the human race: All the sons of men are corrupt. They all do abominable deeds. There is no one who does good. This sober evaluation is based upon the Lords omniscient observation from heaven of the hearts and lives of all people. All He sees is radical depravity in every unconverted life. Spurgeon writes, Where there is enmity to God, there is deep, inward depravity of mind. The words are rendered by eminent critics in an active sense, they have done corruptly; this may serve to remind us that sin is not only in our nature passively as the source of evil, but we ourselves actively fan the flame and corrupt ourselves, making that blacker still which was black as darkness itself already. We rivet our own chains by habit and continuance. Steve Lawson, Foundations of Grace (Reformation Trust, 2006), 141.

Sovereign Election in Psalms

Friday··2012·08·24
Gods sovereign choice of his people guarantees more than their eternal destination. Election guarantees their sanctification here and now, as well. Out of the mass of sinful humanity, God has set apart a chosen people for Himself. Each of these elect individuals will become increasingly godly: But know that the Lord has set apart the godly for himself; the Lord hears when I call to him. Psalm 4:3 David teaches here that God sets apart the godly, an act that is synonymous with divine election. This choice was made before time began, and guarantees that all Gods chosen ones will be sanctified and become godly within time. God does not elect a person because he or she is godly, but in order that the person might become godly. Spurgeon comments upon this verse, The godly are the chosen of God, and are, by distinguishing grace, set apart and separated from among men. Election is a doctrine which unrenewed men cannot endure, but nevertheless, it is a glorious and well-attested truth, and one which should comfort the tempted believer. Election is the guarantee of complete salvation, and an argument for success at the throne of grace. He who chose us for Himself will surely hear our prayers. Steve Lawson, Foundations of Grace (Reformation Trust, 2006), 144.

Preserving Grace in Psalms

Monday··2012·08·27
For I am convinced that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. ���Romans 3:38���39 The righteous are kept forever secure by God, both in this life and throughout all eternity. Not one of God���s saints will ever perish: The steps of a man are established by the Lord, when he delights in his way; though he fall, he shall not be cast headlong, for the Lord upholds his hand. . . . For the Lord loves justice; he will not forsake his saints. They are preserved forever, but the children of the wicked shall be cut off. ���Psalm 37:23���28 In this wisdom psalm, David explains that the Lord guards the righteous. Though the saints may fall into sin, they will never fall from grace. Instead, they will be upheld by God and made to stand forever. VanGemeren comments, ���The Lord establishes the godly, even in times of adversity. He may ���stumble���, either by sinning or by being jealous of the wicked or by the traps laid by the wicked, but he will not fall. . . . The ground for all the blessings is the love of God. He loves ���the just��� and therefore will never forsake ���his faithful ones.��� . . . Nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ (Rom. 8:38���39).��� [The Expositor���s Bible Commentary, Vol. 5, 302.] God permanently holds the saints in His hand, and will never allow them to slip through His sovereign grip. He will preserve them forever. ���Steve Lawson, Foundations of Grace (Reformation Trust, 2006), 147���148.

Hymns of My Youth II: The Lord’s My Shepherd

Saturday··2012·10·06
The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever. —Psalm 23 This paraphrase is originally from The Scottish Psalter (1650). The Lord’s My Shepherd The Lord’s my Shepherd, I’ll not want. He makes me down to lie In pastures green; He leadeth me The quiet waters by. My soul He doth restore again; And me to walk doth make Within the paths of righteousness, Even for His own Name’s sake. Yea, though I walk in death’s dark vale, Yet will I fear no ill; For Thou art with me; and Thy rod And staff my comfort still. My table Thou hast furnishèd In presence of my foes; My head Thou dost with oil anoint, And my cup overflows. Goodness and mercy all my life Shall surely follow me; And in God’s house forevermore My dwelling place shall be. —Great Hymns of the Faith (Zondervan, 1968).

Lords Day 45, 2012

Sunday··2012·11·04
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun, which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber, and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy. Its rising is from the end of the heavens, and its circuit to the end of them, and there is nothing hidden from its heat. Psalm 19:16 Hymns of Thanksgiving Hymn II. The Heavens declare the Glory of God. Augustus Toplady (17401778) The skys a veil, the outward scene Proclaims the majesty within; Which boundless light, tho hid behind, Breaks out too great to be confind. The heavn thy glorious impress wears, Thy image glitters in the stars: The firmament, thine high abode, Seems too the spangled robe of God. Wheneer its beauty I admire, Its radiant globes direct me highr, In silent praise they point to thee, All light, all eye, all majesty! Glory to him who studs the sky, (Earths variegated canopy) With lamps to guide us on our way, Faint emblems of eternal day. Yes, Lord, each shining orb declares Thy name in dazzling characters; As precious gems they dart their rays, And seem to form a crown of praise. The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lords Day 46, 2012

Sunday··2012·11·11
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. O Lord, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O Lord, you know it altogether. You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it. Where shall I go from your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there! If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night, even the darkness is not dark to you; the night is bright as the day, for darkness is as light with you. For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mothers womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them. How precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them! If I would count them, they are more than the sand. I awake, and I am still with you. Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God! O men of blood, depart from me! They speak against you with malicious intent; your enemies take your name in vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, O Lord? And do I not loathe those who rise up against you? I hate them with complete hatred; I count them my enemies. Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting! Psalm 139 Searching and Trying Our Ways Philip Doddridge (16451694) Thy piercing Eye, O God, surveys The various Windings of our Ways; Teach us their tendency to know, And judge the paths in which we go. How wild, how crooked have they been, A Maze of foolishness and Sin! With all the light we vainly boast, Leaving our guide, our souls are lost. Had not Thy mercy been our aid, So fatally our feet had strayed; Stern justice had its prisoners led Down to the chambers of the dead. O turn us back to Thee again, Or we shall search our ways in vain; Shine, and the path of life reveal, And bear us on to Zions hill. Roll on, ye swift-revolving years, And end this round of sins and cares; No more a Wanderer would I roam, But near my Father fix a home. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Thanksgiving with Spurgeon

Friday··2012·11·23
Continuing the Thanksgiving theme: Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever! —Psalm 107:1 It is all we can give him, and the least we can give; therefore let us diligently render to him our thanksgiving. The psalmist is in earnest in the exhortation, hence the use of the interjection “O,” to intensify his words: let us be at all times thoroughly fervent in the praises of the Lord, both with our lips and with our lives, by thanksgiving and thanks living. Jehovah, for that is the name here used, is not to be worshipped with groans and cries, but with thanks, for he is good; and these thanks should be heartily rendered, for his is no common goodness: he is good by nature, and essence, and proven to be good in all the acts of his eternity. Compared with him there is none good, no, not one: but he is essentially, perpetually, superlatively, infinitely good. We are the perpetual partakers of his goodness, and therefore ought above all his creatures to magnify his name. Our praise should be increased by the fact that the divine goodness is not a transient thing, but in the attribute of mercy abides for ever the same, for his mercy endureth for ever. The word endureth has been properly supplied by the translators, but yet it somewhat restricts the sense, which will be better seen if we read it, “for his mercy forever.” That mercy had no beginning, and shall never know an end. Our sin required that goodness should display itself to us in the form of mercy, and it has done so, and will do so evermore; let us not be slack in praising the goodness which thus adapts itself to our fallen nature. —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David [Read the full commentary on Psalm 107 at the Spurgeon Archive].

Lord’s Day 4, 2013

Sunday··2013·01·27
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin! For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. Against you, you only, have I sinned and done what is evil in your sight, so that you may be justified in your words and blameless in your judgment. Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me. Behold, you delight in truth in the inward being, and you teach me wisdom in the secret heart. Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. Let me hear joy and gladness; let the bones that you have broken rejoice. Hide your face from my sins, and blot out all my iniquities. Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me. Cast me not away from your presence, and take not your Holy Spirit from me. Restore to me the joy of your salvation, and uphold me with a willing spirit. Then I will teach transgressors your ways, and sinners will return to you. Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, O God of my salvation, and my tongue will sing aloud of your righteousness. O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise. For you will not delight in sacrifice, or I would give it; you will not be pleased with a burnt offering. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise. Do good to Zion in your good pleasure; build up the walls of Jerusalem; then will you delight in right sacrifices, in burnt offerings and whole burnt offerings; then bulls will be offered on your altar. —Psalm 51 Sins Merciful Lord, Pardon all my sins of this day, week, year, all the sins of my life, sins of early, middle, and advanced years, of omission and commission, of morose, peevish and angry tempers, of lip, life and walk, of hard-heartedness, unbelief, presumption, pride, of unfaithfulness to the souls of men, of want of bold decision in the cause of Christ, of deficiency in outspoken zeal for his glory, of bringing dishonour upon thy great name, of deception, injustice, untruthfulness in my dealings with others, of impurity in thought, word and deed, of covetousness, which is idolatry, of substance unduly hoarded, improvidently squandered, not consecrated to the glory of thee, the great Giver; sins in private and in the family, in study and recreation, in the busy haunts of men, in the study of thy Word and in the neglect of it, in prayer irreverently offered and coldly withheld, in time misspent, in yielding to Satan’s wiles, in opening my heart to his temptations, in being unwatchful when I know him nigh, in quenching the Holy Spirit; sins against light and knowledge, against conscience and the restraints of thy Spirit, against the law of eternal love. Pardon all my sins, known and unknown, felt and unfelt, confessed and not confessed, remembered or forgotten. Good Lord, hear; and hearing, forgive. —The Valley of Vision, Arthur Bennett, editor (Banner of Truth Trust, 2002). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lords Day 15, 2013

Sunday··2013·04·14
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. O Lord, in the morning you hear my voice; in the morning I prepare a sacrifice for you and watch. Psalm 5:3 Morning Hymns Horatius Bonar (18081889) (From the Latin) I. Riseth now the star of day, Let us kneel to God, and pray, That throughout its hours he will Keep us safely from all ill. Bridle Thou our tongue, O Lord, Hush each rising strifeful word; Kindly veil our treacherous eyes From ensnaring vanities. Let our inmost hearts be clean, Banish slothfulness and sin; With spare diet let the pride Of the flesh be mortified. So that, when the day has fled, And the night has come instead, We, preserved thus clean by Thee, Thy great name may glorify. II. Now, O Holy Spirit, one With the Father and the Son, Condescend to fill this heart, Penetrating every part. Mind, and tongue, and soul, and sense, Fill with kindly penitence. Light in us loves fervent fire, Love to all around inspire. III. God of truth and King of power, Ruling every changeful hour, Thou who givest morn its rays, And to noon its golden blaze, Quench the fire of strife within, Cool the heat of night-born sin; Health of body, O impart, And bestow true peace of heart. IV. God of heaven and earth, whose might, Everlasting, infinite, Guideth all the changing moods Of each days vicissitudes, To us the bright joyous eve Of the life unending give; And the blest reward, O send, Of the glory without end. Horatius Bonar, Hymns of Faith and Hope, First Series (James Nisbet & Co., 1878). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lords Day 20, 2013

Sunday··2013·05·19
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. But may all who seek you rejoice and be glad in you; may those who love your salvation say continually, Great is the Lord! Psalm 40:16 God Magnified by Those Who Love His Salvation Phillip Doddridge, (16451694) God of salvation, we adore Thy saving love, thy saving power; And to our utmost stretch of thought, Hail the redemption Thou hast wrought. We love the stroke that breaks our chain, The sword by which our sins are slain; And, while abased in dust we bow, We sing the grace that lays us low. Perish each thought of human pride; Let God alone be magnified. His glory let the heavens resound, Shouted from earths remotest bound. Saints, who His full salvation know, Saints, who but taste it here below, Join every angels voice to raise, Continued, never-ending praise. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 22, 2013

Sunday··2013·06·02
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Keep back your servant also from presumptuous sins; let them not have dominion over me! Then I shall be blameless, and innocent of great transgression. —Psalm 19:13 Penitence O Lord of grace, I have been hasty and short in private prayer, O quicken my conscience to feel this folly, to bewail this ingratitude; My first sin of the day leads into others, and it is just that thou shouldst withdraw thy presence from one who waited carelessly on thee. Keep me at all times from robbing thee, and from depriving my soul of thy due worship; Let me never forgetthat I have an eternal duty to love, honour and obey thee, that thou art infinitely worthy of such; that if I fail to glorify thee I am guilty of infinite evil that merits infinitepunishment, for sin is the violation of an infinite obligation. O forgive me if I have dishonoured thee, Melt my heart, heal my backslidings, and open an intercourse of love. When the fire of thy compassion warms myinward man, and the outpourings of thy Spirit fill my soul, then I feelingly wonder at my own depravity, and deeply abhor myself; then thy grace is a powerful incentive to repentance, and an irresistible motive to inward holiness. May I never forget that thou hast my heartin thy hands. Apply to it the merits of Christ’s atoning bloodwhenever I sin. Let thy mercies draw me to thyself. Wean me from all evil, mortify me to the world, and make me ready for my departure hence animated by the humiliations of penitential love. My soul is often a chariot without wheels, clogged and hindered in sin’s miry clay; Mount it on eagle’s wingsand cause it to soar upward to thyself. —The Valley of Vision, Arthur Bennett, editor (Banner of Truth Trust, 2002). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 25, 2013

Sunday··2013·06·23
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” From you comes my praise in the great congregation; my vows I will perform before those who fear him. —Psalm 22:25 Hymns of Thanksgiving Hymn VIII. Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) My soul with blessing unconfin’d Thy tender care supplies; Thyself the fountain head from whence Those blessings first arise. Let me thy gracious gifts receive With gratitude and joy, And in thy just and ceaseless praise, Each thankful hour employ! —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987).

Lord’s Day 44, 2013

Sunday··2013·11·03
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Tremble, and do not sin; Meditate in your heart upon your bed, and be still. —Psalm 4:4 Communing with Our Hearts Philip Doddridge (1702–1751) Return, my roving heart, return, And chase these shadowy forms no more; " />Seek out some solitude to mourn, And Thy forsaken God implore. Wisdom and pleasure dwell at home— Retired and silent seek them there; This is the way to overcome, The way to break the tempter’s snare. And Thou my God, whose piercing eye Distinct surveys each deep recess, In these abstracted hours draw nigh, And with Thy presence fill the place. Through the recesses of my heart My search let heavenly wisdom guide, And still its radiant beams impart, Till all be searched and purified. Then, with the visits of Thy love, Vouchsafe my inmost soul to cheer; Till every grace shall join to prove, That God hath fixed His dwelling there. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

It Is Good to Give Thanks

Thursday··2013·11·28
It is good to give thanks to the Lord And to sing praises to Your name, O Most High; To declare Your lovingkindness in the morning And Your faithfulness by night, With the ten-stringed lute and with the harp, With resounding music upon the lyre. For You, O Lord, have made me glad by what You have done, I will sing for joy at the works of Your hands. How great are Your works, O Lord! Your thoughts are very deep. A senseless man has no knowledge, Nor does a stupid man understand this: That when the wicked sprouted up like grass And all who did iniquity flourished, It was only that they might be destroyed forevermore. But You, O Lord, are on high forever. For, behold, Your enemies, O Lord, For, behold, Your enemies will perish; All who do iniquity will be scattered. But You have exalted my horn like that of the wild ox; I have been anointed with fresh oil. And my eye has looked exultantly upon my foes, My ears hear of the evildoers who rise up against me. The righteous man will flourish like the palm tree, He will grow like a cedar in Lebanon. Planted in the house of the Lord, They will flourish in the courts of our God. They will still yield fruit in old age; They shall be full of sap and very green, To declare that the Lord is upright; He is my rock, and there is no unrighteousness in Him. —Psalm 92 For Thanksgiving, Charles Spurgeon’s exposition of Psalm 92:2: “To shew forth thy loving kindness in the morning.” The day should begin with praise: no hour is too early for holy song. Loving-kindness is a most appropriate theme for those dewy hours when morn is sowing all the earth with orient pearl. Eagerly and promptly should we magnify the Lord; we leave unpleasant tasks as long as we can, but our hearts are so engrossed with the adoration of God that we would rise betimes to attend to it. There is a peculiar freshness and charm about early morning praises; the day is loveliest when it first opens its eyelids, and God himself seems then to make distribution of the day’s manna, which tastes most sweetly if gathered ere the sun is hot. It seems most meet that if our hearts and harps have been silent through the shades of night we should be eager again to take our place among the chosen choir who ceaselessly hymn the Eternal One. “And thy faithfulness every night.” No hour is too late for praise, the end of the day must not be the end of gratitude. When nature seems in silent contemplation to adore its Maker, it ill becomes the children of God to refrain their thanksgiving. Evening is the time for retrospect, memory is busy with the experience of the day, hence the appropriate theme for song is the divine faithfulness, of which another day has furnished fresh evidences. When darkness has settled down over all things, “a shade immense,” then there comes over wise men a congenial, meditative spirit, and it is most fitting that they should take an expanded view of the truth and goodness of Jehovah— “This sacred shade and solitude, what is it? ’Tis the felt presence of the Deity.” “Every night,” clouded or clear, moonlit or dark, calm or tempestuous, is alike suitable for a song upon the faithfulness of God, since in all seasons, and under all circumstances, it abides the same, and is the mainstay of the believer’s consolation. Shame on us that we are so backward in magnifying the Lord, who in the daytime scatters bounteous love, and in the night season walks his rounds of watching care. —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David (Passmore and Alabaster, 1883), 4:264. [Read entire exposition at spurgeon.org]

Hymns of My Youth III: For the Beauty of the Earth

Saturday··2013·12·07
He loves righteousness and justice; The earth is full of the lovingkindness of the Lord. —Psalm 33:5 457 For the Beauty of the Earth For the beauty of the earth For the glory of the skies, For the love which from our birth Over and around us lies. Refrain: Lord of all, to Thee we raise, This our hymn of grateful praise. For the beauty of each hour, Of the day and of the night, Hill and vale, and tree and flower, Sun and moon, and stars of light. Refrain For the joy of human love, Brother, sister, parent, child, Friends on earth and friends above, For all gentle thoughts and mild. Refrain For Thy Church, that evermore Lifteth holy hands above, Offering up on every shore Her pure sacrifice of love. Refrain —Favorite Hymns of Praise (Tabernacle Publishing Company, 1967).

Lord’s Day 52, 2013

Sunday··2013·12·29
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” The Lord is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer, My God, my rock, in whom I take refuge; My shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. —Psalm 18:2 Christ Is All Horatius Bonar (1808–1889) O Everlasting Light, Giver of dawn and day, Dispeller of the ancient night In which creation lay! O Everlasting Light, Shine graciously within! Brightest of all on earth that’s bright Come, shine away my sin! O everlasting Rock, Sole refuge in distress, My fort when foes assail and mock, My rest in weariness! O everlasting Fount, From which the waters burst, The streams from the eternal mount, That quench time’s sorest thirst! O everlasting Health, From which all healing springs, My bliss, my treasure, and my wealth, To Thee my spirit clings. O Everlasting Truth, Truest of all that’s true, Sure guide of erring age and youth, Lead me, and teach me too. O Everlasting Strength, Uphold me in the way; Bring me, in spite of foes, at length To joy and light and day. O Everlasting Love, Wellspring of grace and peace, Pour down Thy fulness from above, Bid doubt and trouble cease. O Everlasting Rest, Lift off life’s load of care; Relieve, revive this burdened breast, And every sorrow bear. Thou art in heaven our All, Our All on earth art Thou; Upon Thy gracious Name we call, Lord Jesus, bless us now. —Hymns of Faith and Hope, Second Series (James Nisbet & Co., 1878). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

In Preparation for the Lord’s Day: Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Saturday··2014·01·18
In June, 2010, I began a series of posts called Hymns of My Youth, in which I selected hymns from the hymnal of my childhood denomination. The purpose of the series was to turn minds toward worship in preparation for the Lord’s Day, while recalling one of the most enduring parts of my early Christian education—orthodox hymnody. That series turned to three, as I worked through two alternate hymnals used in those churches. Last week, I posted the last of those. This week, I will turn to another hymnal, not one I was raised with, but one I discovered later: The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration, the best modern hymnal I have seen (not that I’ve examined a great many), unfortunately out of print. In the Hymns of My Youth series, I covered the three hymnals, selecting only the doctrinally-sound hymns and gospel songs I had known from the designated time, avoiding repetition, passing over many I knew, but did not remember singing then. In this series, I will observe no limit but orthodoxy and my own preferences. And with that, we begin. Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee Wonderful are Your works, And my soul knows it very well. —Psalm 139:14 Joyful, joyful, we adore Thee, God of glory, Lord of love; Hearts unfold like flowers before Thee, opening to the sun above. Melt the clouds of sin and sadness; drive the dark of doubt away; Giver of immortal gladness, fill us with the light of day. All Thy works with joy surround Thee, earth and heaven reflect Thy rays, Stars and angels sing around Thee, center of unbroken praise. Field and forest, vale and mountain, flowery meadow, flashing sea, Chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in Thee. Thou art giving and forgiving, ever blessing, ever blessed, Wellspring of the joy of living, ocean depth of happy rest! Thou our Father, Christ our Brother—all who live in love are Thine; Teach us how to love each other, lift us to the joy divine. Mortals, join the happy chorus, which the morning stars began; Father love is reigning o’er us, brother love binds man to man. Ever singing, march we onward, victors in the midst of strife, Joyful music leads us Sunward in the triumph song of life. —The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration (Word Music).

In Preparation for the Lord’s Day: Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

In June, 2010, I began a series of posts called Hymns of My Youth, in which I selected hymns from the hymnal of my childhood denomination. The purpose of the series was to turn minds toward worship in preparation for the Lord’s Day, while recalling one of the most enduring parts of my early Christian education—orthodox hymnody. That series turned to three, as I worked through two alternate hymnals used in those churches. Last week, I posted the last of those. This week, I will turn to another hymnal, not one I was raised with, but one I discovered later: The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration, the best modern hymnal I have seen (not that I’ve examined a great many), unfortunately out of print. In the Hymns of My Youth series, I covered the three hymnals, selecting only the doctrinally-sound hymns and gospel songs I had known from the designated time, avoiding repetition, passing over many I knew, but did not remember singing then. In this series, I will observe no limit but orthodoxy and my own preferences. And with that, we begin. Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee Wonderful are Your works, And my soul knows it very well. —Psalm 139:14 Joyful, joyful, we adore Thee, God of glory, Lord of love; Hearts unfold like flowers before Thee, opening to the sun above. Melt the clouds of sin and sadness; drive the dark of doubt away; Giver of immortal gladness, fill us with the light of day. All Thy works with joy surround Thee, earth and heaven reflect Thy rays, Stars and angels sing around Thee, center of unbroken praise. Field and forest, vale and mountain, flowery meadow, flashing sea, Chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in Thee. Thou art giving and forgiving, ever blessing, ever blessed, Wellspring of the joy of living, ocean depth of happy rest! Thou our Father, Christ our Brother—all who live in love are Thine; Teach us how to love each other, lift us to the joy divine. Mortals, join the happy chorus, which the morning stars began; Father love is reigning o’er us, brother love binds man to man. Ever singing, march we onward, victors in the midst of strife, Joyful music leads us Sunward in the triumph song of life. —The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration (Word Music).

In Preparation for the Lord’s Day: Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven

Saturday··2014·02·01
Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven Bless the Lord, O my soul, And all that is within me, bless His holy name. —Psalm 103:1 Praise, my soul, the King of heaven, To His feet thy tribute bring; Ransomed, healed, restored, forgiven, Evermore His praises sing. Alleluia! Alleluia! Praise the everlasting King. Praise the Lord for grace and favor To our fathers in distress; Praise Him, still the same as ever, Slow to chide, and swift to bless. Alleluia! Alleluia! Glorious in his faithfulness. Frail as summer’s flow’r we flourish, Blows the wind and it is gone; But while mortals rise and perish, God endures unchanging on: Alleluia! Alleluia! Praise the high Eternal One. Angels in the height, adore Him, Ye behold Him face to face; Saints triumphant, bow before Him; Gathered in from every race. Alleluia! Alleluia! Praise with us the God of grace. —The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration (Word Music).

Do we love that yoke?

Wednesday··2014·02·12
Why are the nations in an uproar And the peoples devising a vain thing? The kings of the earth take their stand And the rulers take counsel together Against the Lord and against His Anointed, saying, “Let us tear their fetters apart And cast away their cords from us!” —Psalm 2:1–3 We have, in these first three verses, a description of the hatred of human nature against the Christ of God. No better comment is needed upon it than the apostolic song in Acts iv. 27, 28: “For of a truth against thy holy child Jesus, whom thou hast anointed, both Herod, and Pontius Pilate, with the Gentiles, and the people of Israel, were gathered together, for to do whatsoever thy hand and thy counsel determined before to be done.” The Psalm begins abruptly with an angry interrogation; and well it may: it is surely but little to be wondered at, that the sight of creatures in arms against their God should amaze the psalmist’s mind. We see the heathen raging, roaring like the sea, tossed to and fro with restless waves, as the ocean in a storm; and then we mark the people in their hearts imagining a vain thing against God. Where there is much rage there is generally some folly, and in this case there is an excess of it. Note, that the commotion is not caused by the people only, but their leaders foment the rebellion. “The kings of the earth set themselves.” In determined malice they arrayed themselves in opposition against God. It was not temporary rage, but deep-seated hate, for they set themselves resolutely to withstand the Prince of Peace. “And the rulers take counsel together.” They go about their warfare craftily, not with foolish haste, but deliberately. They use all the skill which art can give. Like Pharaoh, they cry, “Let us deal wisely with them.” O that men were half as careful in God’s service to serve him wisely, as his enemies are to attack his kingdom craftily. Sinners have their wits about them, and yet saints are dull. But what say they? what is the meaning of this commotion? “Let us break their bands asunder.” “Let us be free to commit all manner of abominations. Let us be our own gods. Let us rid ourselves of all restraint.” Gathering impudence by the traitorous proposition of rebellion, they add—“let us cast away;” as if it were an easy matter—“let us fling off ‘their cords from us.’” What! O ye kings, do ye think yourselves Samsons? and are the bands of Omnipotence but as green withs before you? Do you dream that you shall snap to pieces and destroy the mandates of God—the decrees of the Most High—as if they were but tow? and do ye say, “Let us cast away their cords from us?” Yes! There are monarchs who have spoken thus, and there are still rebels upon thrones. However mad the resolution to revolt from God, it is one in which man has persevered ever since his creation, and he continues in it to this very day. The glorious reign of Jesus in the latter day will not be consummated, until a terrible struggle has convulsed the nations. His coming will be as a refiner’s fire, and like fuller’s soap, and the day thereof shall burn as an oven. Earth loves not her rightful monarch, but clings to the usurper’s sway: the terrible conflicts of the last days will illustrate both the world’s love of sin and Jehovah’s power to give the kingdom to his only Begotten. To a graceless neck the yoke of Christ is intolerable, but to the saved sinner it is easy and light. We may judge ourselves by this, do we love that yoke, or do we wish to cast it from us? —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David (Passmore and Alabaster, 1883) [read entire commentary on Psalm 2 at spurgeon.org].

The Lord Hears

Thursday··2014·02·13
But know that the Lord has set apart the godly man for Himself; The Lord hears when I call to Him. —Psalm 4:3 “But know.’ Fools will not learn, and therefore they must again and again be told the same thing, especially when it is such a bitter truth which is to be taught them, viz.:—the fact that the godly are the chosen of God, and are, by distinguishing grace, set apart and separated from among men. Election is a doctrine which unrenewed men cannot endure, but nevertheless, it is a glorious and well-attested truth, and one which should comfort the tempted believer. Election is the guarantee of complete salvation, and an argument for success at the throne of grace. He who chose us for himself will surely hear our prayer. The Lord’s elect shall not be condemned, nor shall their cry be unheard. David was king by divine decree, and we are the Lord’s people in the same manner: let us tell our enemies to their faces, that they fight against God and destiny, when they strive to overthrow our souls. O beloved, when you are on your knees, the fact of your being set apart as God’s own peculiar treasure, should give you courage and inspire you with fervency and faith. “Shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him?” Since he chose to love us he cannot but choose to hear us. —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David (Passmore and Alabaster, 1883) [read entire commentary on Psalm 4 at spurgeon.org].

In Preparation for the Lord’s Day: The Lord’s My Shepherd

Saturday··2014·06·07
The Lord’s My Shepherd He guides me in the paths of righteousness Psalm 23:3The Lord’s my Shepherd, I’ll not want; He makes me down to lie In pastures green; He leadeth me The quiet waters by. My soul He doth restore again; And me to walk doth make Within the paths of righteousness, E’en for His own Name’s sake. Yea, though I walk in death’s dark vale, Yet will I fear no ill; For Thou art with me, and Thy rod And staff my comfort still. My table Thou hast furnishèd In presence of my foes; My head Thou dost with oil anoint, And my cup overflows. Goodness and mercy all my life Shall surely follow me; And in God’s house forevermore My dwelling place shall be. —The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration (Word Music).

In Preparation for the Lord’s Day: O God, Our Help in Ages Past

Saturday··2014·06·21
O God, Our Help in Ages Past Lord, You have been our dwelling place in all generations. Psalm 90:1O God, our help in ages past, Our hope for years to come, Our shelter from the stormy blast, And our eternal home! Under the shadow of Thy throne Thy saints have dwelt secure; Sufficient is Thine arm alone, And our defense is sure. Before the hills in order stood, Or earth received her frame, From everlasting Thou art God, To endless years the same. A thousand ages in Thy sight Are like an evening gone; Short as the watch that ends the night Before the rising sun. Time, like an ever-rolling stream, Bears all its sons away; They fly, forgotten, as a dream Dies at the op’ning day. O God, our help in ages past, Our hope for years to come, Be Thou our guide while life shall last, And our eternal home. —The Hymnal for Worship & Celebration (Word Music).

Lord’s Day 36, 2014

Sunday··2014·09·07
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” May the Lord answer you in the day of trouble! May the name of the God of Jacob set you securely on high! May He send you help from the sanctuary And support you from Zion! May He remember all your meal offerings And find your burnt offering acceptable! Selah. May He grant you your heart’s desire And fulfill all your counsel! We will sing for joy over your victory, And in the name of our God we will set up our banners. May the Lord fulfill all your petitions. Now I know that the Lord saves His anointed; He will answer him from His holy heaven With the saving strength of His right hand. Some boast in chariots and some in horses, But we will boast in the name of the Lord, our God. They have bowed down and fallen, But we have risen and stood upright. Save, O Lord; May the King answer us in the day we call. —Psalm 20 Paraphrases on Select Parts of Holy Writ Para. IV. The xxth Psalm. Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) Belov’d of God, may Jesus hear The ardent breathings of thy pray’r, And cancel thy transgressions; Be with thee in affliction’s day, Redeem thee from thy fears, and say Amen to thy petitions! Thy ev’ry need he will supply; His saints shall surely find him nigh, The God whom they rely on; He will not turn away his face, But save thee from his holy place, And send thee help from Sion. Thy feeblest pray’r shall reach his throne, Thy ev’ry pang is noted down, And thou shall be forgiv’n; He loves thee, troubled as thou art; And all the pantings of thy heart Are treasured up in heav’n. God is our triumph in distress; His children’s privilege it is To smile at tribulation: Jesus, to thee we lift our voice, By grace enabled to rejoice, In hope of thy salvation. Ready to hear, O Lord, thou art, Mighty to take thy people’s part, And help them in affliction: Creation kneels to thy command, The saving strength of thy right hand, Shall be our sure protection. In chariots some repose their trust, Of horses others make their boast, But we in God are stronger: Who on the arm of flesh rely, Trembling before our face shall fly When we shall more than conquer. Still may the palm to us be giv’n, Thy saints, O mighty King of heav’n. Continue to deliver: Support us with thy strength’ning grace, ’Till we, in yon celestial place, Sit down with thee for ever. —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 8, 2016

Sunday··2016·02·21
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Shin. Princes persecute me without cause, But my heart stands in awe of Your words. I rejoice at Your word, As one who finds great spoil. I hate and despise falsehood, But I love Your law. Seven times a day I praise You, Because of Your righteous ordinances. Those who love Your law have great peace, And nothing causes them to stumble. I hope for Your salvation, O Lord, And do Your commandments. My soul keeps Your testimonies, And I love them exceedingly. I keep Your precepts and Your testimonies, For all my ways are before You. Tav. Let my cry come before You, O Lord; Give me understanding according to Your word. —Psalm 119:161–169 Paraphrases on Select Parts of Holy Writ Para. IX. Psalm cxix. Verses 161–164, &c. to the 169th. Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) Princes have persecuted me, But, Lord, my trust is still in thee; Me from my hope they sought to move But could not stir me from thy love. I fly for refuge to my Lord, For comfort to his healing word: From Saul my safe retreat he is, And all the troublers of my peace. Each passing hour displays his care; He saves me from the latent snare: His love with wonder I survey, And praise him seven times a day. Jesus, my mind from earth withdraw Great peace have they that love thy law: No precept there which thou hast giv’n Is hard to them who strive for heav’n. I too have look’d thy health to see, And taste the peace that comes from thee: Each inward lust have strove to kill, And walk in all thy perfect will. My soul hath lov’d thy ways and thee, Thy word is life and health to me Exceedingly thy word I prize, The fund where heavenly treasure lies. Thy testimonies are my food, The saving oracles of God: Studious of them on earth I’ll be, And then fly up to reign with thee. —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 5, 2017

Sunday··2017·01·29
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Those who trust in the Lord Are as Mount Zion, which cannot be moved but abides forever. As the mountains surround Jerusalem, So the Lord surrounds His people From this time forth and forever. For the scepter of wickedness shall not rest upon the land of the righteous, So that the righteous will not put forth their hands to do wrong. Do good, O Lord, to those who are good And to those who are upright in their hearts. But as for those who turn aside to their crooked ways, The Lord will lead them away with the doers of iniquity. Peace be upon Israel. —Psalm 125 Paraphrases on Select Parts of Holy Writ Para. XII. The cxxvth Psalm.Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) Who, Lord, confide in thee, And in thy faith endure, Shall as Mount Sion be, Immoveable and sure: As Christ their rock, unshook, unmov’d; Of God eternally belov’d. The rising mountains stand Around Jerusalem; So God’s almighty hand, Guards us who trust in him: We never will of safety doubt, While he shall compass us about. Ye souls who stand in God, Whom Jesus’ blood hath bought, The guilty sinner’s rod Shall never be your lot: Ye shall not fall, upheld by grace, Nor put your hands to wickedness. The upright men in heart Jehovah will defend; Will not from them depart, But love them to the end: He will do well, O saints, to you, The Lord will never let you go. But such as will forsake The happy path of peace, Deceivers, that turn back To their own wickedness, The double wrath of God shall feel, And sink unpardon’d into hell. While they who hear his call, And plead a Saviour’s blood, Shall reign in joy with all The ransom’d ones of God Peace upon Israel shall come, To endless glory gather’d home. —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 16, 2017

Sunday··2017·04·16
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” O God, You are my God; I shall seek You earnestly; My soul thirsts for You, my flesh yearns for You, In a dry and weary land where there is no water. Thus I have seen You in the sanctuary, To see Your power and Your glory. Because Your lovingkindness is better than life, My lips will praise You. So I will bless You as long as I live; I will lift up my hands in Your name. My soul is satisfied as with marrow and fatness, And my mouth offers praises with joyful lips. When I remember You on my bed, I meditate on You in the night watches, For You have been my help, And in the shadow of Your wings I sing for joy. My soul clings to You; Your right hand upholds me. But those who seek my life to destroy it, Will go into the depths of the earth. They will be delivered over to the power of the sword; They will be a prey for foxes. But the king will rejoice in God; Everyone who swears by Him will glory, For the mouths of those who speak lies will be stopped. —Psalm 63 Paraphrases on Select Parts of Holy Writ Para. XIV. Psalm lxiii. Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) O God, my God thou art, My Father too by grace; I dare not from my hope depart. Or cease to seek thy face: My thirsty spirit pants Thy plenitude to prove, And comprehend with all thy saints, The fulness of thy love. In this dry, barren land, Where water is not found, I fain would fly to thy right hand, Where living streams abound: Thee, thee, I long to know, Athirst for God I am, And come to thee as needy now As when at first I came. Thy glory and thy pow’r I long again to see, To have again, as heretofore, Sweet fellowship with thee; Again to feel thy peace, Again thy name to praise: Better than life thy favour is, To all that know thy grace. With persevering hope, Thy mercy I’ll proclaim, My hands in steady faith lift up, And magnify thy name. Thy praises I’ll reveal, ’Till I from earth remove, My mouth with joyful lips shall tell The wonders of thy love. Surely I reason have On thee, my God, to trust; My life thou liftest from the grave, My spirit from the dust: Thy grace and boundless might My theme by day shall be, My glory in the silent night, To meditate on thee. My succour thou hast been When ev’ry helper failed, Or I, ere now, had fell by sin, And Satan had prevail’d My soul, redeem’d from death. To thee her off’ring brings, And hides her helpless head beneath The covert of thy wings. Thou keep’st my steady feet In thy appointed road; By all the pow’rs of hell beset, I follow after God: In Jesus I am safe, My castle of resort; His hand is both my shield and staff. My shelter and support. The men who seek to tread Thy faithful people down, And persecute, in them, their Head, And crucify their Son, Thou, Lord, will surely foil In thy avenging day, And give their bodies for a spoil To ev’ry beast of prey. But me, and all who love Thy worship and thy ways, Thou far from danger wilt remove, And hide us in thy place: Who speak the words of truth, Thou, Lord, on them shall smile. But thou wilt stop the liar’s mouth, And slay the sons of guile. —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

Lord’s Day 22, 2017

Sunday··2017·05·28
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Behold, I long for Your precepts; Revive me through Your righteousness. May Your lovingkindnesses also come to me, O Lord, Your salvation according to Your word; So I will have an answer for him who reproaches me, For I trust in Your word. And do not take the word of truth utterly out of my mouth, For I wait for Your ordinances. So I will keep Your law continually, Forever and ever. And I will walk at liberty, For I seek Your precepts. I will also speak of Your testimonies before kings And shall not be ashamed. I shall delight in Your commandments, Which I love. And I shall lift up my hands to Your commandments, Which I love; And I will meditate on Your statutes. Remember the word to Your servant, In which You have made me hope. —Psalm 119:40–49 Paraphrases on Select Parts of Holy Writ Para. XV. Psalm cxix. From the 40th Verse to the 49th. Augustus Toplady (1740–1778) Let thy loving mercy, Lord, Come also unto me; Now according to thy word, My present Saviour be: Unbelievers then no more Shall against my hope blaspheme; Forc’d to own, “The mighty pow’r Of God hath rescu’d him.” In thy word my trust I place, And humbly urge my claim, ’Till I of thy saving grace, A living witness am: Give me, Lord, thyself to know, Then in me thy word fulfil, To walk in all things here below, According to thy will. Seeking now in steadfast faith, I wait a word from thee; Bring my feet into the path Of perfect liberty; Then, when I the path have found, Un-asham’d thy truth I’ll shew: Kings shall hear the joyful sound, And seek salvation too. My delight is in thy word Which I have lov’d of old, Dearer is thy promise. Lord, To me than mines of gold: Up to thee my hands I lift, ’Till I of thy grace receive; Give the never changing gift, Thy full redemption give. —The Complete Works of Augustus Toplady (Sprinkle Publications, 1987). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

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