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Worthy Is the Lamb

(52 posts)

Lord’s Day 27, 2008

Sunday··2008·07·06
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. (Psalme 122:1) Law and Gospel Samuel Davies (1723–1761) With conscious fear and humble awe, I view the terrors of the law; Condemned at that tremendous bar I shrink, I tremble, and despair. But hark, salvation in my ears, Sounds sweetly and dispels my fears; Jesus appears, and by His cross, Fulfills His Father’s broken laws. Jesus, Saviour! Dearest name! By Him alone salvation came; Terror, destruction, and despair, Where e’er I look besides appear. Adam, my head and father fell, and sunk his offspring down to hell; And the dread sword of justice waits, To guard me from the heavenly gates. Unnumbered crimes of dreadful names Call loud for everlasting flames; And all the duties I have done, Can neither merit, nor atone. Yet weak and guilty as I am, I fix my trust in Jesus name. Jesus, whose righteousness alone Can for the deepest crimes atone. On Him, my soul, on Him rely; The terms are fixed—Believe or die. Thee let the glorious gospel draw, Or perish by the fiery law. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 102 (Geneva Bible) A prayer of the afflicted, when he shall be in distresse, and pour forth his meditation before the Lord. 1 O Lord, heare my prayer, and let my crye come vnto thee. 2 Hide not thy face from me in the time of my trouble: incline thine eares vnto me: when I call, make haste to heare me. 3 For my dayes are consumed like smoke, and my bones are burnt like an herthe. 4 Mine heart is smitten and withereth like grasse, because I forgate to eate my bread. 5 For the voyce of my groning my bones doe cleaue to my skinne. 6 I am like a pelicane of the wildernesse: I am like an owle of the deserts. 7 I watch and am as a sparrowe alone vpon the house top. 8 Mine enemies reuile me dayly, and they that rage against me, haue sworne against me. 9 Surely I haue eaten asshes as bread, and mingled my drinke with weeping, 10 Because of thine indignation and thy wrath: for thou hast heaued me vp, and cast me downe. 11 My dayes are like a shadowe that fadeth, and I am withered like grasse. 12 But thou, O Lord, doest remaine for euer, and thy remembrance from generation to generation. 13 Thou wilt arise and haue mercy vpon Zion: for the time to haue mercie thereon, for the appointed time is come. 14 For thy seruants delite in the stones thereof, and haue pitie on the dust thereof. 15 Then the heathen shall feare the Name of the Lord, and all the Kings of the earth thy glory, 16 When the Lord shall build vp Zion, and shall appeare in his glory, 17 And shall turne vnto the prayer of the desolate, and not despise their prayer. 18 This shall be written for the generation to come: and the people, which shalbe created, shall prayse the Lord. 19 For he hath looked downe from the height of his Sanctuarie: out of the heauen did the Lord beholde the earth, 20 That he might heare the mourning of the prisoner, and deliuer the children of death: 21 That they may declare the Name of the Lord in Zion, and his prayse in Ierusalem, 22 When the people shalbe gathered together, and the kingdomes to serue the Lord. 23 He abated my strength in the way, and shortened my dayes. 24 And I sayd, O my God, take me not away in the middes of my dayes: thy yeeres endure from generation to generation. 25 Thou hast aforetime layde the foundation of the earth, and the heauens are the worke of thine hands. 26 They shall perish, but thou shalt endure: euen they all shall waxe olde as doeth a garment: as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed. 27 But thou art the same, and thy yeeres shall not fayle. 28 The children of thy seruants shall continue, and their seede shall stand fast in thy sight. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lord’s Day 27, 2008

Lord’s Day 33, 2008

Sunday··2008·08·17
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. (Psalme 122:1) The Glorious Gospel of the Blessed Godby Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) What wisdom, majesty, and grace, Through all the gospel shine! ’Tis God that speaks, and we confess The doctrine most divine. Down from His starry throne on high, The almighty Savior comes; Lays His bright robes of glory by, and feeble flesh assumes. The mighty debt that sinners owed, Upon the cross He pays; Then through the clouds ascends to God, ’Mid shouts of loftiest praise. There He, our great High Priest, appears before His Father’s throne; Mingles His merits with our tears, And pours salvation down. Great God, with reverence we adore Thy justice and Thy grace; And on Thy faithfulness and pow’r Our firm dependence place.—Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 144 (Geneva Bible) A Psalme of David. 1 Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth mine hands to fight, and my fingers to battell. 2 He is my goodnes and my fortresse, my towre and my deliuerer, my shield, and in him I trust, which subdueth my people vnder me. 3 Lord, what is man that thou regardest him! or the sonne of man that thou thinkest vpon him! 4 Man is like to vanitie: his dayes are like a shadow, that vanisheth. 5 Bow thine heauens, O Lord, and come downe: touch the mountaines and they shall smoke. 6 Cast forth the lightning and scatter them: shoote out thine arrowes, and consume them. 7 Send thine hand from aboue: deliuer me, and take me out of the great waters, and from the hand of strangers, 8 Whose mouth talketh vanitie, and their right hand is a right hand of falsehood. 9 I wil sing a new song vnto thee, O God, and sing vnto thee vpon a viole, and an instrument of ten strings. 10 It is he that giueth deliuerance vnto Kings, and rescueth Dauid his seruant from the hurtfull sworde. 11 Rescue me, and deliuer me from the hand of strangers, whose mouth talketh vanitie, and their right hand is a right hand of falshood: 12 That our sonnes may be as the plantes growing vp in their youth, and our daughters as the corner stones, grauen after the similitude of a palace: 13 That our corners may be full, and abounding with diuers sorts, and that our sheepe may bring forth thousands and ten thousand in our streetes: 14 That our oxen may be strong to labour: that there be none inuasion, nor going out, nor no crying in our streetes. 15 Blessed are the people, that be so, yea, blessed are the people, whose God is the Lord. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lord’s Day 33, 2008

Lord’s Day 39, 2008

Sunday··2008·09·28
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. (Psalme 122:1) A Song of Praise for Deliveranceby John Mason (1645–1694)I that I am drawn out of the depth, Will sing upon the shore; I that in hill’s dark suburbs lay, Pure mercy will adore. The terrors of the living God My soul did so affright, I feared lest I should be condemned To an eternal night. Kind was the pity of my friends, But could not ease my smart; Their words, indeed, did reach my case, But could not reach my heart. Ah, then, what was this world to me, To whom God’s Word was dark; Who in my dungeon could not see One beam or shining spark? What, then, were all the creatures’ smiles, When the Creator frowned? My days were nights, my life was death, My being was my wound. Tortured and racked with hellish fears, When God the blow should give; Mine eyes did fail, my heart did sink; Then mercy bid me live. God’s furnace doth in Zion stand, But Zion’s God sits by; As the refiner views his gold With an observant eye, God’s thoughts are high, His love is wise, His wounds a cure intend; And though He doth not always smile, He loves unto the end. Thy love is constant to its line, Though clouds oft come between; Oh, could my faith but pierce these clouds, It might be always seen. But I am weak, and forced to cry, Take up my soul to Thee; Then, as Thou ever art the same, So shall I ever be. Then shall I ever, ever sing, While Thou dost ever shine; I have Thine own dear pledge for this, Lord Thou art ever mine. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 7 (Geneva Bible) Shigaion of Dauid, which he sang unto the Lord, concerning the wordes of Chush the sonne of Iemini. 1 O Lord my God, in thee I put my trust: saue me from all that persecute me, and deliuer me, 2 Least he deuoure my soule like a lion, and teare it in pieces, while there is none to helpe. 3 O Lord my God, if I haue done this thing, if there be any wickednes in mine handes, 4 If I haue rewarded euill vnto him that had peace with mee, (yea I haue deliuered him that vexed me without cause) 5 Then let the enemie persecute my soule and take it: yea, let him treade my life downe vpon the earth, and lay mine honour in the dust. Selah. 6 Arise, O Lord, in thy wrath, and lift vp thy selfe against the rage of mine enemies, and awake for mee according to the iudgement that thou hast appointed. 7 So shall the Congregation of the people compasse thee about: for their sakes therefore returne on hie. 8 The Lord shall iudge the people: Iudge thou me, O Lord, according to my righteousnesse, and according to mine innocencie, that is in mee. 9 Oh let the malice of the wicked come to an ende: but guide thou the iust: for the righteous God trieth the hearts and reines. 10 My defence is in God, who preserueth the vpright in heart. 11 God iudgeth the righteous, and him that contemneth God euery day. 12 Except he turne, he hath whet his sword: he hath bent his bowe and made it readie. 13 Hee hath also prepared him deadly weapons: hee will ordeine his arrowes for them that persecute me. 14 Beholde, hee shall trauaile with wickednes: for he hath conceiued mischiefe, but he shall bring foorth a lye. 15 Hee hath made a pitte and digged it, and is fallen into the pit that he made. 16 His mischiefe shall returne vpon his owne head, and his crueltie shall fall vpon his owne pate. 17 I wil praise the Lord according to his righteousnes, and will sing praise to the Name of the Lord most high. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lord’s Day 39, 2008

Lords Day 45, 2008

Sunday··2008·11·09 · 1 Comments
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. (Psalme 122:1) God Saying to the Soul, that He is its Salvation by Philip Doddridge (17021751) alvation, oh, melodious sound,  To wretched dying men; Salvation, that from God proceeds, And leads to God again. Rescued from hells eternal gloom, From fiends, and fires, and chains; Raised to the paradise of bliss, Where love and glory reigns. But, oh, may a degenerate soul, Sinful and weak as mine, Presume to raise a trembling eye To blessing so divine? The luster of so bright a bliss My feeble heart oer bears; And unbelief almost perverts The promise into tears. My Savior God, no voice but Thine, These dying hopes can raise; Speak Thy salvation so my soul, And turn its tears to praise. My Savior God, this broken voice, Transported shall proclaim; And call on the angelic harps, To sound so sweet a name. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 49 (Geneva Bible) To him that excelleth. A Psalme committed to the sonnes of Korah. 1 Heare this, all ye people: giue eare, all ye that dwell in the world, 2 As well lowe as hie, both rich and poore. 3 My mouth shall speake of wisdome, and the meditation of mine heart is of knowledge. 4 I will incline mine eare to a parable, and vtter my graue matter vpon the harpe. 5 Wherefore should I feare in the euil dayes, when iniquitie shall compasse me about, as at mine heeles? 6 They trust in their goods, and boast them selues in the multitude of their riches. 7 Yet a man can by no meanes redeeme his brother: he can not giue his raunsome to God, 8 (So precious is the redemption of their soules, and the continuance for euer) 9 That he may liue still for euer, and not see the graue. 10 For he seeth that wise men die, and also that the ignorant and foolish perish, and leaue their riches for others. 11 Yet they thinke, their houses, and their habitations shall continue for euer, euen from generation to generation, and call their lands by their names. 12 But man shall not continue in honour: he is like the beastes that die. 13 This their way vttereth their foolishnes: yet their posteritie delite in their talke. Selah. 14 Like sheepe they lie in graue: death deuoureth them, and the righteous shall haue domination ouer them in the morning: for their beautie shall consume, when they shall goe from their house to graue. 15 But God shall deliuer my soule from the power of the graue: for he will receiue me. Selah. 16 Be not thou afrayd when one is made rich, and when the glory of his house is increased. 17 For he shall take nothing away when he dieth, neither shall his pompe descende after him. 18 For while he liued, he reioyced himselfe: and men will prayse thee, when thou makest much of thy selfe. 19 He shall enter into the generation of his fathers, and they shall not liue for euer. 20 Man is in honour, and vnderstandeth not: he is like to beasts that perish. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lords Day 45, 2008

Lords Day 52, 2008

Sunday··2008·12·28
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. (Psalme 122:1) Cords of Love by Ralph Erskine (16851752) Seek God while yet He may be found, Call on Him while Hes near; While graces trump, the joyful sound Of mercy strikes your ear. Oh, let the wicked change his way, And the unrighteous man, His thoughts, and legal hopes, that stray, Cross to the gospel plan. And let him now return to God, The Lord our righteousness; Who, through the merit of His blood, In mercy will him bless. To our God let him run betimes, For gracious will He be; And for his multitude of crimes Will pardons multiply. Let, saith the Lord, My boundless grace Move guilty souls to come, And trust Me with their desprate case When hopeless thoughts do roam. Because My thoughts and ways divine Are not as yours; for why? All yours are base and low, but Mine Immensely great and high. For as the heavns, in height and space, Transcend your earthly boors; Much more My thoughts and ways of grace Surmount all thoughts of yours. Great God, then bid the mountains move; Our sins that reach the sky, Be melted down with flames of love, More infinitely high. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 98 (Geneva Bible) A Psalme. 1 Sing vnto the Lord a newe song: for hee hath done marueilous things: his right hand, and his holy arme haue gotten him the victorie. 2 The Lord declared his saluation: his righteousnes hath he reueiled in the sight of ye nations. 3 He hath remembred his mercy and his trueth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth haue seene the saluation of our God. 4 All the earth, sing ye loude vnto the Lord: crie out and reioyce, and sing prayses. 5 Sing prayse to the Lord vpon the harpe, euen vpon the harpe with a singing voyce. 6 With shalmes and sound of trumpets sing loude before the Lord the King. 7 Let the sea roare, and all that therein is, the world, and they that dwell therein. 8 Let the floods clap their hands, and let the mountaines reioyce together 9 Before the Lord: for he is come to iudge the earth: with righteousnesse shall hee iudge the world, and the people with equitie. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lords Day 52, 2008

Lords Day 6, 2009

Sunday··2009·02·08
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. Psalm 122:1 (geneva bible) The Free Gospel by Ralph Erskine (16851752) Ho, every thirsty soul and all That poor and needy are; Heres water of salvation well For you to come and share. Heres freedom both from sin and woe, And blessings all divine; Here streams of love and mercy flow, Like floods of milk and wine. Approach the fountainhead of bliss, Thats open like the sea, To buyers that are moneyless, To poorest beggars free. Why spend you all your wealth and pains, For that which is not bread, And for unsatisfying gains, On which no soul can feed? While vain ye seek, with earthly toys, To fill an empty mind, You lose immortal solid joys, And feed upon the wind. Incline your heart, and come to me; Hear, and your soul shall live; For mercies sure, as well as free, I bind myself to give. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 119:4148 (Geneva Bible) Vav. 41 And let thy louing kindnesse come vnto me, O Lord, and thy saluation according to thy promise. 42 So shall I make answere vnto my blasphemers: for I trust in thy woorde. 43 And take not the woorde of trueth vtterly out of my mouth: for I waite for thy iudgements. 44 So shall I alway keepe thy Lawe for euer and euer. 45 And I will walke at libertie: for I seeke thy precepts. 46 I will speake also of thy testimonies before Kings, and will not be ashamed. 47 And my delite shalbe in thy commandements, which I haue loued. 48 Mine handes also will I lift vp vnto thy commandements, which I haue loued, and I will meditate in thy statutes. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lorde Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lords Day 6, 2009

Lords Day 12, 2009

Sunday··2009·03·22
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. Psalm 122:1 (geneva bible) The Fountain (The Invitation of the Gospel) Samuel Davies (17231761) Today the living streams of grace Flow to refresh the thirsty soul; Pardon and life and boundless bliss In plenteous rivers round us roll. Ho, ye that pine away and die, Come, and your raging thirst allay; Come all that will, heres rich supply, A fountain that shall neer decay. Come all, the blessed Jesus cries, Freely My blessing I will give. The spirit echoes back the voice, And bids us freely drink and live. The saints below, that do but taste, And saints above, who drink at will, Cry jointly, Thirsty sinners! haste, and drink, the springs exhaustless still. Let all that hear the joyful sound, To spread it though the world unite; From house to house proclaim it round, Each man his fellow man invite. Like thirsty flocks, come let us go; Come ever color, every age; And while the living waters flow, Let all their parching thirst assuage. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 119:8996 (Geneva Bible) Lamed. 89 O Lord, thy worde endureth for euer in heauen. 90 Thy trueth is from generation to generation: thou hast layed the foundation of the earth, and it abideth. 91 They continue euen to this day by thine ordinances: for all are thy seruants. 92 Except thy Lawe had bene my delite, I should now haue perished in mine affliction. 93 I wil neuer forget thy precepts: for by them thou hast quickened me. 94 I am thine, saue me: for I haue sought thy precepts. 95 The wicked haue waited for me to destroy me: but I will consider thy testimonies. 96 I haue seene an ende of all perfection: but thy commandement is exceeding large. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lorde Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lords Day 12, 2009

Lords Day 18, 2009

Sunday··2009·05·03
I reioyced, when they sayd to me, We wil go into the house of the Lord. Psalm 122:1 (geneva bible) Praise for Conversion Samuel Stennett (17271795) Come, ye that fear the Lord, And listen, while I tell How narrowly my feet escaped The snares of death and hell. The flattering joys of sense Assailed my foolish heart, While Satan with malicious skill Guided the poisonous dart. I fell beneath the stroke, But fell to rise again; My anguish roused me into life, And pleasure sprung from pain. Darkness and shame and grief, Oppressed my gloomy mind; I looked around me for relief, But no relief could find. At length to God I cried; He heard my plaintive sigh; He heard, and instantly he sent Salvation from on high. My drooping head he raised; My bleeding wounds he healed; Pardoned my sins, and, with a smile, The gracious pardon sealed. Oh, may I never forget The mercy of my God; Nor ever want a tongue to spread His loudest praise abroad. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Psalme 119:137144 (Geneva Bible) Tsaddi. 137 Righteous art thou, O Lord, and iust are thy iudgements. 138 Thou hast commanded iustice by thy testimonies and trueth especially. 139 My zeale hath euen consumed mee, because mine enemies haue forgotten thy wordes. 140 Thy word is prooued most pure, and thy seruant loueth it. 141 I am small and despised: yet do I not forget thy precepts. 142 Thy righteousnesse is an euerlasting righteousnes, and thy Lawe is trueth. 143 Trouble and anguish are come vpon me: yet are thy commandements my delite. 144 The righteousnes of thy testimonies is euerlasting: graunt me vnderstanding, and I shall liue. Grace be with you, and Peace from God our Father, and from the Lorde Jesus Christ.
continue reading Lords Day 18, 2009

Lords Day 24, 2009

Sunday··2009·06·14
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Room at the Gospel Feast Philip Doddridge (17021751) The King of heaven His table spreads, And dainties crown the board; Not paradise with all its joys Could such delight afford. Pardon and peace to dying men, And endless life are given, And the rich blood that Jesus shed To raise the soul to heaven. Ye hungry poor, that long have strayed In sins dark mazes, come. Come from the hedges and highways, And grace shall find you room. Millions of souls, in glory now, Were fed and feasted here; And millions more, still on the way, Around the board appear. Yet is his house and heart so large, That millions more may come; Nor could the wide assembling world Overfill the spacious room. All things are ready; come away, Nor weak excuses frame. Crowd to your places at the feast, And bless the Founders name. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 1:613    6 There came a man sent from God, whose name was John. 7 He came as a witness, to testify about the Light, so that all might believe through him. 8 He was not the Light, but he came to testify about the Light. 9 There was the true Light which, coming into the world, enlightens every man. 10 He was in the world, and the world was made through Him, and the world did not know Him. 11 He came to His own, and those who were His own did not receive Him. 12 But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name, 13 who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God. St. John, after beginning his gospel with a statement of our Lords nature as God, proceeds to speak of His forerunner, John the Baptist. The contrast between the language used about the Saviour, and that used about His forerunner, ought not to be overlooked. Of Christ we are told that He was the eternal God,the Creator of all things,the source of life and light. Of John the Baptist we are told simply, that there was a man sent from God, whose name was John. We see, firstly, in these verses, the true nature of a Christian ministers office. We have it in the description of John the Baptist: He came for a witness, to bear witness of the light, that all men through him might believe. Christian ministers are not priests, nor mediators between God and man. They are not agents into whose hands men may commit their souls, and carry on their religion by deputy. They are witnesses. They are intended to bear testimony to Gods truth, and specially to the great truth that Christ is the only Saviour and light of the world. This was St. Peters ministry on the day of Pentecost.with many other words did he testify. (Acts ii. 40.) This was the whole tenor of St. Pauls ministry.He testified both to the Jews and to the Greeks repentance towards God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ. (Acts xx. 21.) Unless a Christian minister bears full testimony to Christ, he is not faithful in his office. So long as he does testify of Christ, he has done his part, and will receive his reward, although the hearers may not believe his testimony. Until a ministers hearers believe on that Christ of whom they are told, they receive no benefit from the ministry. They may be pleased and interested; but they are not profited until they believe. The great end of the ministers testimony is that through him, men may believe. We see, secondly, in these verses, one principal position which our Lord Jesus Christ occupies towards mankind. We have it in the words, He was the true light which lighteth every man that cometh into the world. Christ is to the souls of men what the sun is to the world. He is the centre and source of all spiritual light, warmth, life, health, growth, beauty, and fertility. Like the sun, He shines for the common benefit of all mankind,for high and for low, for rich and for poor, for Jew and for Greek. Like the sun, He is free to all. All may look at Him, and drink health out of His light. If millions of mankind were mad enough to dwell in caves underground, or to bandage their eyes, their darkness would be their own fault, and not the fault of the sun. So, likewise, if millions of men and women love spiritual darkness rather than light, the blame must be laid on their blind hearts, and not on Christ. Their foolish hearts are darkened. (John iii. 19; Rom. i. 21.) But whether men will see or not, Christ is the true sun, and the light of the world. There is no light for sinners except in the Lord Jesus. We see, thirdly, in these verses, the desperate wickedness of mans natural heart. We have it in the words, Christ was in the world, and the world was made by Him, and the world knew Him not. He came unto His own, and His own received Him not. Christ was in the world invisibly, long before He was born of the Virgin Mary. He was there from the very beginning, ruling, ordering, and governing the whole creation. By Him all things are held together. (Coloss. i. 17.) He gave to all life and breath, rain from heaven, and fruitful seasons. By Him kings reigned, and nations were increased or diminished. Yet men knew Him not, and honoured Him not. They worshiped and served the creature more than the Creator. (Rom. i. 25.) Well may the natural heart be called wicked! But Christ came visibly into the world, when He was born at Bethlehem, and fared no better. He came to the very people whom He had brought out from Egypt, and purchased for His own. He came to the Jews, whom He had separated from other nations, and to whom He had revealed Himself by the prophets. He came to those very Jews who had read of Him in the Old Testament Scriptures,seen Him under types and figures in their temple services,and professed to be waiting for His coming. And yet, when He came, those very Jews received Him not. They even rejected Him, despised Him, and slew Him. Well may the natural heart be called desperately wicked! We see, lastly, in these verses, the vast privileges of all who receive Christ, and believe on Him. We are told that as many as received Him, to them gave He power to become you sons of God, even to those who believe on His name. Christ will never be without some servants. If the vast majority of the Jews did not receive Him as the Messiah, there were, at any rate, a few who did. To them He gave the privilege of being Gods children. He adopted them as members of His Fathers family. He reckoned them His own brethren and sisters, bone of His bone, and flesh of His flesh. He conferred on them a dignity which was ample recompense for the cross which they had to carry for His sake. He made them sons and daughters of the Lord Almighty. Privileges like these, be it remembered, are the possession of all, in every age, who receive Christ by faith, and follow Him as their Savour. They are children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. (Gal. iii. 26.) They are born again by a new and heavenly birth, and adopted into the family of the King of kings. Few in number, and despised by the world as they are, they are cared for with infinite love by a Father in heaven, who, for His Sons sake, is well pleased with them. In time He provides them with everything that is for their good. In eternity He will give them a crown of glory that fades not away. These are great things! But faith in Christ gives men an ample title to them. Good masters care for their servants, and Christ cares for His. Are we ourselves sons of God? Have we been born again? Have we the marks which always accompany the new birth,sense of sin, faith in Jesus, love of others, righteous living, separation from the world? Let us never be content until we can give a satisfactory answer to these questions. Do we desire to be sons of God? Then let us receive Christ as our Savour, and believe on Him with the heart. To every one that so receives Him, He will give the privilege of becoming a son of God. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012), 3:1317 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. 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continue reading Lords Day 24, 2009

Lords Day 30, 2009

Sunday··2009·07·26
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Applying for Relief to the All-Sufficiency of Christ Samuel Davies (17231761) I hear the counsel of a Friend; To the kind voice, my soul, attend. Come, sinners, wretched, blind, and poor, Come, draw from My unbounded store. I only ask you to receive, For freely I My blessings give. Jesus, and are thy treasurers free, Then I may dare to come to Thee? I come for grace, that gold refined, To enrich and beautify my mind, Grace that will trials well endure, By trials more divinely pure. Naked I come for that bright dress, Thy perfect spotless righteousness, That glorious robe, so richly dyed In Thine own blood, my shame to hide. Like Bartimaeus, Lord, to Thee I come; oh, give the blind to see! Een clay is eye-salve in Thine hand, If Thou the blessing but command. Poor, naked, blind I hither came, Oh, let me not depart the same! Let me return, all-gracious Lord, Enriched, adorned, to sight restored. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 1:4351 Phillip and Nathanael Follow Christ   43 The next day He purposed to go into Galilee, and He found Philip And Jesus said to him, Follow Me. 44 Now Philip was from Bethsaida, of the city of Andrew and Peter. 45 Philip found Nathanael and said to him, We have found Him of whom Moses in the Law and also the Prophets wroteJesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. 46 Nathanael said to him, Can any good thing come out of Nazareth? Philip said to him, Come and see. 47 Jesus saw Nathanael coming to Him, and said of him, Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no deceit! 48 Nathanael said to Him, How do You know me? Jesus answered and said to him, Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you. 49 Nathanael answered Him, Rabbi, You are the Son of God; You are the King of Israel. 50 Jesus answered and said to him, Because I said to you that I saw you under the fig tree, do you believe? You will see greater things than these. 51 And He said to him, Truly, truly, I say to you, you will see the heavens opened and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man. Let us observe, as we read these verses, how various are the paths by which souls are led into the narrow way of life. We are told of a man, named Philip, being added to the little company of Christs disciples. He does not appear to have been moved, like Andrew and his companions, by the testimony of John the Baptist. He was not drawn, like Simon Peter, by the out-spoken declaration of a brother. He seems to have been called directly by Christ Himself, and the agency of man seems not to have been used in his calling. Yet in faith and life he became one with those who were disciples before him. Though led by different paths, they all entered the same road, embraced the same truths, served the same Master, and at length reached the same home. The fact before us is a deeply important one. It throws light on the history of all Gods people in every age, and of every tongue. There are diversities of operations in the saving of souls. All true Christians are led by one Spirit, washed in one blood, serve one Lord, lean on one Saviour, believe one truth, and walk by one general rule. But all are not converted in one and the same manner. All do not pass through the same experience. In conversion, the Holy Spirit acts as a sovereign. He calleth every one severally as He will. A careful recollection of this point may save us much trouble. We must beware of making the experience of other believers the measure of our own. We must beware of denying anothers grace, because he has not been led by the same way as ourselves. Has a man got the real grace of God? This is the only question that concerns us.Is he a penitent man? Is he a believer? Does he live a holy life?Provided these inquiries can be answered satisfactorily, we may well be content. It matters nothing by what path a man has been led, if he has only been led at last into the right way. Let us observe, secondly, in these verses, how much of Christ there is in the Old Testament Scriptures. We read that when Philip described Christ to Nathanael, he says, We have found Him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write. Christ is the sum and substance of the Old Testament. To Him the earliest promises pointed in the days of Adam, and Enoch, and Noah, and Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob. To Him every sacrifice pointed in the ceremonial worship appointed at Mount Sinai. Of Him every high priest was a type, and every part of the tabernacle was a shadow, and every judge and deliverer of Israel was a figure. He was the prophet like unto Moses, whom the Lord God promised to send, and the King of the house of David, who came to be Davids Lord as well as son. He was the Son of the virgin, and the Lamb, foretold by Isaiah,the righteous Branch mentioned by Jeremiah,the true Shepherd, foreseen by Ezekiel,the Messenger of the Covenant, promised by Malachi,and the Messiah, who, according to Daniel, was to be cut off, though not for Himself. The further we read in the volume of the Old Testament, the clearer do we find the testimony about Christ. The light which the inspired writers enjoyed in ancient days was, at best, but dim, compared to that of the Gospel. But the coming Person they all saw afar off, and on whom they all fixed their eyes, was one and the same. The Spirit, which was in them, testified of Christ. (1 Pet. i. 11) Do we stumble at this saying? Do we find it hard to see Christ in the Old Testament, because we do not see His name? Let us be sure that the fault is all our own. It is our spiritual vision which is to blame, and not the book. The eyes of our understanding need to be enlightened. The veil has yet to be taken away. Let us pray for a more humble, childlike, and teachable spirit, and let us take up Moses and the prophets again. Christ is there, though our eyes may not yet have seen Him. May we never rest until we can subscribe to our Lords words about the Old Testament Scriptures, They are they which testify of me. (John v. 39.) Let us observe, thirdly, in these verses, the good advice which Philip gave to Nathanael. The mind of Nathanael was full of doubts about the Saviour, of whom Philip told Him. Can there any good thing, he said, come out of Nazareth? And what did Philip reply? He said, Come and see. Wiser counsel than this it would be impossible to conceive! If Philip had reproved Nathanaels unbelief, he might have driven him back for many a day, and given offence. If he had reasoned with him, he might have failed to convince him, or might have confirmed him in his doubts. But by inviting him to prove the matter for himself, he showed his entire confidence in the truth of his own assertion, and his willingness to have it tested and proved. And the result shows the wisdom of Philips words. Nathanael owed his early acquaintance with Christ to that frank invitation, Come and see. If we call ourselves true Christians, let us never be afraid to deal with people about their souls as Philip dealt with Nathanael. Let us invite them boldly to make proof of our religion. Let us tell them confidently that they cannot know its real value until they have tried it. Let us assure them that vital Christianity courts every possible inquiry. It has no secrets. It has nothing to conceal. Its faith and practice are spoken against, just because they are not known. Its enemies speak evil of things with which they are not acquainted. They understand neither what they say nor whereof they affirm. Philips mode of dealing, we may be sure, is one principal way to do good. Few are ever moved by reasoning and argument. Still fewer are frightened into repentance. The man who does most good to souls, is often the simple believer who says to his friends, I have found a Saviour; come and see Him. Let us observe, lastly, in these verses, the high character which Jesus gives of Nathanael. He calleth him an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile. Nathanael, there can be no doubt, was a true child of God, and a child of God in difficult times. He was one of a very little flock. Like Simeon and Anna, and other pious Jews, he was living by faith and waiting prayerfully for the promised Redeemer, when our Lords ministry began. He had that which grace alone can give, an honest heart, a heart without guile. His knowledge was probably small. His spiritual eyesight was dim. But he was one who had lived carefully up to his light. He had diligently used such knowledge as he possessed. His eye had been single, though his vision had not been strong. His spiritual judgment had been honest, though it had not been powerful. What he saw in Scripture, he had held firmly, in spite of Pharisees and Sadducees, and all the fashionable religion of the day. He was an honest Old Testament believer, who had stood alone. And here was the secret of our Lord peculiar commendation! He declared Nathanael to be a true son of Abraham,a Jew inwardly, possessing circumcision in the spirit as well as in the letter,an Israelite in heart, as well as a son of Jacob in the flesh. Let us pray that we may be of the same spirit as Nathanael. An honest, unprejudiced mind,a child-like willingness to follow the truth, wherever the truth may lead us,a simple, hearty desire to be guided, taught, and led by the Spirit,a thorough determination to use every spark of light which we have,are a possession of priceless value. A man of this spirit may live in the midst of much darkness, and be surrounded by every possible disadvantage to his soul. But the Lord Jesus will take care that such a man does not miss the way to heaven. The meek will he guide in judgment: and the meek will he teach his way. (Psalm xxv. 9.) J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Baker Books, 2007), 3:7680 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 30, 2009

Lords Day 36, 2009

Sunday··2009·09·06
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Sinners Address to Christ John Mason (16451694) Where lies a sin, Ill drop a tear, Then view redeeming blood; To mourning souls Christ will appear, And surely do them good. Tis thou alone, my Lord, canst give This aching heart relief; Christs gentle voice would make it live, His hand wipe off my grief. Those falsely called the sweets of sin Are bitter unto me; I loath the state that I am in, Lord, may I come to thee? But, oh, wilt Thou receive him now Thats coming to Thy door? For I can bring no dowry, Lord; I come extremely poor. What if my tears could make a flood, My righteousness is dross; Those tears need washing in Thy blood, Though wept upon Thy cross. I have an argument to plead, Which Thou canst not deny Thy grace is free, and Thou doest give To sinners such as I. Thou doest invite all wandering souls, And I am one of those; With Thee the sick do find a cure, The weary find repose. The world and sin will never vex, Will trouble and molest; I therefore trust my soul with Christ, To bring to heavens rest. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). The Gospel According to John Christ Witnesses to the Woman at the Well 4Therefore when the Lord knew that the Pharisees had heard that Jesus was making and baptizing more disciples than John 2 (although Jesus Himself was not baptizing, but His disciples were), 3 He left Judea and went away again into Galilee. 4 And He had to pass through Samaria. 5 So He came to a city of Samaria called Sychar, near the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph; 6 and Jacobs well was there. So Jesus, being wearied from His journey, was sitting thus by the well. It was about the sixth hour. There are two sayings in these verses which deserve particular notice. They throw light on two subjects in religion, on which clear and well defined opinions are of great importance. We should observe, for one thing, what is said about baptism. We read that Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples. The expression here used is a very remarkable one. In reading it we seem irresistibly led to one instructive conclusion. That conclusion is, that baptism is not the principal part of Christianity, and that to baptize is not the principal work for which Christian ministers are ordained. Frequently we read of our Lord preaching and praying. Once we read of His administering the Lords supper. But we have not a single instance recorded of His ever baptizing any one. And here we are distinctly told, that it was a subordinate work, which He left to others. Jesus himself baptized not, but his disciples. The lesson is one of peculiar importance in the present day. Baptism, as a sacrament ordained by Christ Himself, is an honorable ordinance, and ought never to be lightly esteemed in the churches. It cannot be neglected or despised without great sin. When rightly used, with faith and prayer, it is calculated to convey the highest blessings. But baptism was never meant to be exalted to the position which many now-a-days assign to it in religion. It does not act as a charm. It does not necessarily convey the grace of the Holy Spirit. The benefit of it depends greatly on the manner in which it is used. The doctrine taught, and the language employed about it, in some quarters, are utterly inconsistent with the fact announced in the text. If baptism was all that some say it is, we would never have been told, that Jesus himself baptized not. Let it be a settled principle in our minds that the first and chief business of the Church of Christ is to preach the Gospel. The words of Paul ought to be constantly remembered,Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the Gospel. (1 Cor. i. 17.) When the Gospel of Christ is faithfully and fully preached we need not fear that the sacraments will be undervalued. Baptism and the Lords supper will always be most truly reverenced in those churches where the truth as it is in Jesus is most fully taught and known. We should observe, for another thing, in this passage, what is said about our Lords human nature. We read that Jesus was wearied with his journey. We learn from this, as well as many other expressions in the Gospels, that our Lord had a body exactly like our own. When the Word became flesh, He took on Him a nature like our own in all things, sin only excepted. Like ourselves, He grew from infancy to youth, and from youth to mans estate. Like ourselves, He hungered, thirsted, felt pain, and needed sleep. He was liable to every sinless infirmity to which we are liable. In all things His body was framed like our own. The truth before us is full of comfort for all who are true Christians. He to whom sinners are bid to come for pardon and peace, is one who is man as well as God. He had a real human nature when He was upon earth. He took a real human nature with Him, when He ascended up into heaven. We have at the right hand of God a High Priest who can be touched with the feeling of our infirmities, because He has suffered Himself being tempted. When we cry to Him in the hour of bodily pain and weakness, He knows well what we mean. When our prayers and praises are feeble through bodily weariness, He can understand our condition. He knows our frame. He has learned by experience what it is to be a man. To say that the Virgin Mary, or any one else, can feel more sympathy for us than Christ, is ignorance no less than blasphemy. The man Christ Jesus can enter fully into everything that belongs to mans condition. The poor, the sick, and the suffering, have in heaven One who is not only an almighty Savior, but a most sympathetic Friend. The servant of Christ should grasp firmly this great truth, that there are two perfect and complete natures in the one Person whom he serves. The Lord Jesus, in whom the Gospel bids us believe, is, without doubt, almighty God,equal to the Father in all things, and able to save to the uttermost all those that come unto God by Him. But that same Jesus is no less certainly perfect man,able to sympathize with man in all his bodily sufferings, and acquainted by experience with all that mans body has to endure. Power and sympathy are marvellously combined in Him who died for us on the cross. Because He is God, we may repose the weight of our souls upon Him with unhesitating confidence. He is mighty to save.Because He is man, we may speak to Him with freedom, about the many trials to which flesh is heir. He knows the heart of a man.Here is rest for the weary! Here is good news! Our Redeemer is man as well as God, and God as well as man. He that believes on Him, has everything that a child of Adam can possibly require, either for safety or for peace. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Baker Books, 2007), 3:190193 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 36, 2009

Lords Day 48, 2009

Sunday··2009·11·29
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Christian Warfare Samuel Stennett (17271795) My Captain sounds the alarm of war; Awake, the powers of hell are near! To arms! To arms! I hear him cry, Tis yours to conquer, or to die! Roused by the animating sound, I cast my eager eyes around; Make haste to gird my armor on, And bid each trembling fear be gone. Hope is my helmet; faith my shield; Thy Word, my God! The sword I wield; With sacred truth my loins are girt, And holy zeal inspires my heart. Thus armed I venture on the fight; Resolved to put my foes to flight; While Jesus kindly deigns to spread His conquering banner oer my head. In him I hope; in him I trust; His bleeding cross is all my boast. Through troops of foes Hell lead me on To victory and the victors crown. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 6:2227I Am the Bread of Life The next day the crowd that stood on the other side of the sea saw that there was no other small boat there, except one, and that Jesus had not entered with His disciples into the boat, but that His disciples had gone away alone. 23 There came other small boats from Tiberias near to the place where they ate the bread after the Lord had given thanks. 24 So when the crowd saw that Jesus was not there, nor His disciples, they themselves got into the small boats, and came to Capernaum seeking Jesus. 25 When they found Him on the other side of the sea, they said to Him, Rabbi, when did You get here? 26 Jesus answered them and said, Truly, truly, I say to you, you seek Me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate of the loaves and were filled. 27 Do not work for the food which perishes, but for the food which endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give to you, for on Him the Father, God, has set His seal. We should mark first, in this passage, what knowledge of mans heart our Lord Jesus Christ possesses. We see Him exposing the false motives of those who followed Him for the sake of the loaves and fishes. They had followed Him across the Lake of Galilee. They seemed at first sight ready to believe in Him, and do Him honour. But He knew the inward springs of their conduct, and was not deceived. Ye seek me, He said, not because ye saw the miracles, but because ye ate the loaves, and were filled. The Lord Jesus, we should never forget, is still the same. He never changes. He reads the secret motives of all who profess and call themselves Christians. He knows exactly why they do all they do in their religion. The reasons why they go to Church, and why they receive the sacrament,why they attend family prayers, and why they keep Sunday holy,all are naked and opened to the eyes of the great Head of the Church. By Him actions are weighed as well as seen. Man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh at the heart. (1 Samuel 16:7">1 Sam. xvi. 7.) Let us be real, true, and sincere in our religion, whatever else we are. The sinfulness of hypocrisy is very great, but its folly is greater still. It is not hard to deceive ministers, relatives, and friends. A little decent outward profession will often go a long way. But it is impossible to deceive Christ. His eyes are as a flame of fire. (Rev. i. 14.) He sees us through and through. Happy are those who can say,Thou, Lord, who knowest all things, knowest that we love thee. (John xxi. 17.) We should mark, secondly, in this passage, what Christ forbids. He told the crowds who followed Him so diligently for the loaves and fishes, not to labour for the food that perisheth. It was a remarkable saying, and demands explanation. Our Lord, we may be sure, did not mean to encourage idleness. It would be a great mistake to suppose this hard labour was the appointed lot of Adam in Paradise. Labour was ordained to be mans occupation after the fall. Labour is honourable in all men. No one need be ashamed of belonging to the working classes. Our Lord himself worked in the carpenters shop at Nazareth. Paul wrought as a tent-maker with his own hands. What our Lord did mean to rebuke was, that excessive attention to labour for the body, while the soul is neglected, which prevails everywhere in the world. What He reproved was, the common habit of labouring only for the things of time, and letting alone the things of eternityof minding only the life that now is, and disregarding the life to come. Against this habit He delivers a solemn warning. Surely, we must all feel our Lord did not say the words before us without good cause. They are a startling caution which should ring in the ears of many in these latter days. How many in every rank of life are doing the very thing against which Jesus warns us! They are labouring night and day for the food that perisheth, and doing nothing for their immortal souls. Happy are those who early learn betimes the respective value of soul and body, and give the first and best place in their thoughts to salvation. One thing is needful. He that seeks first the kingdom of God, will never fail to find all other things added to him. (Matt. vi. 33.) We should mark, thirdly, in this passage, what Christ advises. He tells us to labour for the food that endureth to everlasting life. He would have us take pains to find food and satisfaction for our souls. That food is provided in rich abundance in Him. But he that would have it must diligently seek it. How are we to labour? There is but one answer. We must labour in the use of all appointed means. We must read our Bibles, like men digging for hidden treasure. We must wrestle earnestly in prayer, like men contending with a deadly enemy for life. We must take our whole heart to the house of God, and worship and hear like those who listen to the reading of a benefactors will. We must fight daily against sin, the world, and the devil, like those who fight for liberty, and must conquer, or be slaves. These are the ways we must walk in if we would find Christ, and be found of Him. This is labouring. This is the secret of getting on about our souls. Labour like this no doubt is very uncommon. In carrying it on we shall have little encouragement from man, and shall often be told that we are extreme, and go too far. Strange and absurd as it is, the natural man is always fancying that we may take too much thought about religion, and refusing to see that we are far more likely to take too much thought about the world. But whatever man may say, the soul will never get spiritual food without labour. We must strive, we must run, we must fight, we must throw our whole heart into our souls affairs. It is the violent who take the kingdom. (Matt. xi. 12.) We should mark, lastly, in this passage, what a promise Christ holds out. He tells us that He himself will give eternal food to all who seek it: The Son of man shall give you the food that endureth unto everlasting life. How gracious and encouraging these words are! Whatever we need for the relief of our hungering souls, Christ is ready and willing to bestow. Whatever mercy, grace, peace, strength we require, the Son of man will give freely, immediately, abundantly, and eternally. He is sealed, and appointed, and commissioned by God the Father for this very purpose. Like Joseph in the Egyptian famine, it is His office to be the Friend, and Almoner [distributor of alms, benefactor], and Reliever of a sinful world. He is far more willing to give than man is to receive. The more sinners apply to Him, the better He is pleased. And now, as we leave this rich passage, let us ask ourselves, what use we make of it? For what are we labouring ourselves? What do we know of lasting food and satisfaction for our inward man? Never let us rest until we have eaten of the food which Christ alone can give. Those who are content with any other spiritual food will sooner or later lie down in sorrow. (Isa. l. 11.) J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012), 3:345348. Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 48, 2009

Lords Day 2, 2010

Sunday··2010·01·10
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Spiritual Warfare Samuel Davies (17231761) Arm thee in panoply divine, My soul, and fired with courage rise; A thousand enemies combine To obstruct thy progress to the skies. Infernal darts perpetual fly And scatter various deaths around; Around thee thousands daily die And none escape without a wound. The world presents her tempting charms, And wears the aspect of a friend, Yet, ah, she carries deadly arms, And all her smiles in ruin end. But, oh, the flesh, that latent foe, That treacherous enemy in my breast! Tis hence proceeds my overthrow, And hence Im conquered by the rest. Through troops of potent enemies, Through hostile snares and fields of blood, If I expect the glorious prize, I must pursue my dangerous road. But, ah, how can a feeble worm Obtain so hard a victory? Alas, I perish in the storm, And helpless fall, and bleed, and die. The glorious prize stands in view, But deaths and dangers stop my way; Thou glorious prize! Adieu, adieu! Here, cruel foes! Come size your prey. But hark, an animating voice, Majestic breaks from the upper sky, Courage, frail worm! Live and rejoice, I have procured the victory. Suspended on the accursed tree, I crushed the might of all thy foes, Dying, I spoiled their tyranny, And triumphed over them when I rose. This arm that props the universe, And holds up natures tottering frame, Can all surrounding harms disperse, And safe protect the feeblest name. The captain of salvation deigns To lead the van, and guard thy way; And since thy conquering Leader reigns, The infernal powers shall miss their prey. In me confide; from me derive Courage and strength to keep the field; In crowds of death then thou shalt live, And all thy foes shall stubborn yield. The Spirits sword victorious yield, And steel thy breast with righteousness; Let faith be thy triumphant shield; Thy helmet, hope of heavnly bliss. See in my hands the glorious prize; This crown the conqueror shall wear. Rise then with dauntless courage rise, And bid adieu to every fear. Though sharp the conflict, tis but short; Victry with active wings draws nigh. And my brave soldiers, all unhurt, Ere long shall triumph in the sky. Blessed Jesus, with martial zeal, I arm, and rush into the fight; And through my weakness still I feel, I am almighty in thy might. Thy gracious Words my heart inspire With generous zeal for noble deeds; Let hell and all her hosts appear, My soul, undaunted, now proceeds. Satan, affrighted at Thy frown, Retreats, despairing of his prey; And all the flatteries earth has shown, In vain their treacherous charms display. The flesh, subdued by grace divine, No more shall triumph oer the man. Now, glorious prize, I call thee mine, Though earth and hell do all they can. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 6:6671Confession by PeterAs a result of this many of His disciples withdrew and were not walking with Him anymore. 67 So Jesus said to the twelve, You do not want to go away also, do you? 68 Simon Peter answered Him, Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life. 69 We have believed and have come to know that You are the Holy One of God. 70 Jesus answered them, Did I Myself not choose you, the twelve, and yet one of you is a devil? 71 Now He meant Judas the son of Simon Iscariot, for he, one of the twelve, was going to betray Him. These verses form a sorrowful conclusion to the famous discourse of Christ which occupies the greater part of the sixth chapter. They supply a melancholy proof of the hardness and corruption of mans heart. Even when the Son of God was the preacher, many seem to have heard in vain. Let us mark in this passage what an old sin backsliding is. We read that when our Lord had explained what He meant by eating and drinking his flesh and blood,From that time, many went back and walked no more with him. The true grace of God no doubt is an everlasting possession. From this men never fall away entirely, when they have once received it. The foundation of God standeth sure. My sheep shall never perish. (2 Tim. ii. 19; John x. 28.) But there is counterfeit grace and unreal religion in the Church, wherever there is true; and from counterfeit grace thousands may, and do, fall away. Like the stony ground hearers, in the parable of the sower, many have no root in themselves, and so in time of trial fall away. All is not gold that glitters. All blossoms do not come to fruit. All are not Israel which are called Israel. Men may have feelings, desires, convictions, resolutions, hopes, joys, sorrows in religion, and yet never have the grace of God. They may run well for a season, and bid fair to reach heaven, and yet break down entirely after a time, go back to the world, and end like Demas, Judas Iscariot, and Lots wife. It must never surprise us to see and hear of such cases in our own days. If it happened in our Lords time and under our Lords teaching, much more may we expect it to happen now. Above all, it must never shake our faith and discourage us in our course. On the contrary, we must make up our minds that there will be backsliders in the Church as long as the world stands. The sneering infidel, who defends his unbelief by pointing at them, must find some better argument than their example. He forgets that there will always be counterfeit coin where there is true money. Let us mark, secondly, in this passage, the noble declaration of faith which the Apostle Peter made. Our Lord had said to the twelve, when many went back, Will ye also go away? At once Peter replied, with characteristic zeal and fervor, Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the words of eternal life. And we believe and art sure that thou art that Christ, the Son of the living God. The confession contained in these words is a very remarkable one. Living in a professedly Christian land, and surrounded by Christian privileges; we can hardly form an adequate idea of its real value. For a humble Jew to say of one whom Scribes, and Pharisees, and Sadducees agreed in rejecting, Thou hast the words of eternal life; thou art the Christ, was an act of mighty faith. No wonder that our Lord said, in another place, Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is heaven. (Matt. xvi. 17.) But the question with which Peter begins, is just as remarkable as his confession. To whom shall we go? said the noble-hearted Apostle. Whom shall we follow? To what teacher shall we betake ourselves? Where shall we find any guide to heaven to compare with thee? What shall we gain by forsaking thee? What Scribe, what Pharisee, what Sadducee, what Priest, what Rabbi can show us such words of eternal life as thou showest? The question is one which every true Christian may boldly ask, when urged and tempted to give up his religion, and go back to the world. It is easy for those who hate religion to pick holes in our conduct, to make objections to our doctrines, to find fault with our practices. It may be hard sometimes to give them any answer. But after all, To whom shall we go, if we give up our religion? Where shall we find such peace, and hope, and solid comfort as in serving Christ, however poorly we serve Him? Can we better ourselves by turning our back on Christ, and going back to our old ways? We cannot. Then let us hold on our way and persevere. Let us mark, lastly, in this passage, what little benefit some men get from religious privileges. We read that our Lord said, Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil. And it goes on, He spoke of Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. If ever there was a man who had great privileges and opportunities, that man was Judas Iscariot. A chosen disciple, a constant companion of Christ, a witness of His miracles, a hearer of His sermons, a commissioned preacher of His kingdom, a fellow and friend of Peter, James, and John,it would be impossible to imagine a more favourable position for a mans soul. Yet if anyone ever fell hopelessly into hell, and made shipwreck at last for eternity, that man was Judas Iscariot. The character of that man must have been black indeed, of whom our Lord could say he is a devil. Let us settle it firmly in our minds, that the possession of religious privileges alone is not enough to save our souls. It is neither place, nor light, nor company, nor opportunities, but grace that man needs to make him a Christian. With grace we may serve God in the most difficult position,like Daniel in Babylon, Obadiah in Ahabs court, and the saints in Neros household. Without grace we may live in the full sunshine of Christs countenance, and yet, like Judas, be miserably cast away. Then let us never rest until we have grace reigning in our souls. Grace is to be had for the asking. There is One sitting at the right hand of God who has said,Ask, and it shall be given you. (Matt. vii. 7.) The Lord Jesus is more willing to give grace than man is to seek it. If men have it not, it is because they do not ask it. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012).
continue reading Lords Day 2, 2010

Lords Day 8, 2010

Sunday··2010·02·21
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. God Insensibly Withdrawn Philip Doddridge (17021751) A present God is all our strength, And all our joy and hope; When He withdraws, our comforts die, And every grace must droop. But flattring trifles charm our hearts To court their false embrace, Till justly this neglected Friend Averts His angry face. He leaves us, and we miss Him not, But go presumptuous on; Till baffled, wounded, and enslaved, We learn that God is gone. And what, my soul, can then remain, One ray of light to give? Severed from Him, their better life, How can His children live? Hence, all ye painted forms of joy, And leave my heart to mourn; I would devote these eyes to tears, Till cheered by His return. Look back, my Lord, and own the place, Where once Thy temple stood; For lo, its ruins bear the mark Of rich atoning blood. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 8:1220I Am the Light of the World Then Jesus again spoke to them, saying, I am the Light of the world; he who follows Me will not walk in the darkness, but will have the Light of life. 13 So the Pharisees said to Him, You are testifying about Yourself; Your testimony is not true. 14 Jesus answered and said to them, Even if I testify about Myself, My testimony is true, for I know where I came from and where I am going; but you do not know where I come from or where I am going. 15 You judge according to the flesh; I am not judging anyone. 16 But even if I do judge, My judgment is true; for I am not alone in it, but I and the Father who sent Me. 17 Even in your law it has been written that the testimony of two men is true. 18 I am He who testifies about Myself, and the Father who sent Me testifies about Me. 19 So they were saying to Him, Where is Your Father? Jesus answered, You know neither Me nor My Father; if you knew Me, you would know My Father also. 20 These words He spoke in the treasury, as He taught in the temple; and no one seized Him, because His hour had not yet come. The conversation between our Lord and the Jews, which begins with these verses, is full of difficulties. The connection between one part and another, and the precise meaning of some of the expressions which fell from our Lords lips, are things hard to be understood. In passages like this it is true wisdom to acknowledge the great imperfection of our spiritual vision, and to be thankful if we can glean a few handfuls of truth. Let us notice, for one thing, in these verses, what the Lord Jesus says of Himself. He proclaims, I am the light of the world. These words imply that the world needs light, and is naturally in a dark condition. It is so in a moral and spiritual point of view: and it has been so for nearly 6,000 years. In ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, in modern England, France, and Germany, the same report is true. The vast majority of men neither see nor understand the value of their souls, the true nature of God, nor the reality of a world to come! Notwithstanding all the discoveries of art and science, darkness still covers the earth, and gross darkness the people. (Isaiah. 60:2.) For this state of things, the Lord Jesus Christ declares Himself to be the only remedy. He has risen, like the sun, to diffuse light, and life, and peace, and salvation, in the midst of a dark world. He invites all who want spiritual help and guidance to turn to Him, and take Him for their leader. What the sun is to the whole solar systemthe center of light, and heat, and life, and fertilitythat He has come into the world to be to sinners. Let this saying sink down into our hearts. It is weighty and full of meaning. False lights on every side invite mans attention in the present day. Reason, philosophy, earnestness, liberalism, conscience, and the voice of the Church, are all, in their various ways, crying loudly that they have got the light to show us. Their advocates know not what they say. Wretched are those who believe their high professions! He only is the true light who came into the world to save sinners, who died as our substitute on the cross, and sits at Gods right hand to be our Friend. In His light we shall see light. (Psalm xxxvi. 9.) Let us notice, secondly, in these verses, what the Lord Jesus says of those who follow Him. He promises, He that followeth Me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. To follow Christ is to commit ourselves wholly and entirely to Him as our only leader and Saviour, and to submit ourselves to Him in every matter, both of doctrine and practice. Following is only another word for believing. It is the same act of soul, only seen from a different point of view. As Israel followed the pillar of cloud and fire in all their journeyingsmoving whenever it moved, stopping whenever it tarried, asking no questions, marching on in faithso must a man deal with Christ. He must follow the Lamb wherever He goeth. (Rev. xiv. 4.) He that so follows Christ shall not walk in darkness. He shall not be left in ignorance, like the many around him. He shall not grope in doubt and uncertainty, but shall see the way to heaven, and know where he is going.He shall have the light of life. He shall feel within him the light of Gods countenance shining on him. He shall find in his conscience and understanding a living light, which nothing can altogether quench. The lights with which many please themselves shall go out in the valley of the shadow of death, and prove worse than useless. But the light that Christ gives to every one that follows Him shall never fail. Let us notice, lastly, in these verses, what the Lord Jesus says of His enemies. He tells the Pharisees that, with all their pretended wisdom, they were ignorant of God. Ye neither know Me nor my Father; if ye had known Me, ye would have known my Father also. Ignorance like this is only too common. There are thousands who are conversant with many branches of human learning, and can even argue and reason about religion, and yet know nothing really about God. That there is such a Being as God they fully admit. But His character and attributes revealed in Scripture, His holiness, His purity, His justice, His perfect knowledge, His unchangeableness, are things with which they are little acquainted. In fact, the subject of Gods nature and character makes them uncomfortable, and they do not like to dwell upon it. The grand secret of knowing God is to draw near to Him through Jesus Christ. Approached from this side, there is nothing that need make us afraid. Viewed from this standpoint, God is the sinners friend. God, out of Christ, may well fill us with alarm. How shall we dare to look at so high and holy a Being?God in Christ is full of mercy, grace, and peace. His laws demands are satisfied. His holiness need not make us afraid. Christ in one word is the way and door, by which we must ever draw near to the Father. If we know Christ, we shall know the Father. It is His own word,No man cometh unto the Father but by Me. (John xiv. 6.) Ignorance of Christ is the root of ignorance of God. Wrong at the starting-point, the whole sum of a mans religion is full of error. And now, where are we ourselves? Do we know? Many are living and dying in a kind of fog.Where are we going? Can we give a satisfactory answer? Hundreds go out of existence in utter uncertainty.Let us leave nothing uncertain that concerns our everlasting salvation. Christ, the light of the world, is for us as well as for others, if we humbly follow Him, cast our souls on Him, and become His disciples.Let us not, like thousands, waste our lives in doubting, and arguing, and reasoning, but simply follow. The child that saysI will not learn anything until I know something, will never learn at all. The man that saysI must first understand everything before I become a Christian, will die in his sins. Let us begin by following, and then we shall find light. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 8, 2010

Lords Day 15, 2010

Sunday··2010·04·11
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Devil defeated by Faith, Well Fixed and Furnished Ralph Erskine (16851752) Be sober, vigilant, and stout; For every day and hour, Your foe, the devil, walks about, Still seeking to devour. Whom, by a steady faith resist, In Christ, the Captains name; Knowing your fellow-soldiers blessed, Your welfare is the same. But may the God, and source of all, Your grace and warlike store, Who did by Jesus Christ you call, To his eternal glore. After your short whiles suffring now, May he perfect you all, Establish, strengthen, settle you, Firm like a brazen wall. To him whose all-sufficiency, Alone can thus sustain; All glory and dominion be Forevermore. Amen. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 9:1325 They brought to the Pharisees the man who was formerly blind. 14 Now it was a Sabbath on the day when Jesus made the clay and opened his eyes. 15 Then the Pharisees also were asking him again how he received his sight. And he said to them, He applied clay to my eyes, and I washed, and I see. 16 Therefore some of the Pharisees were saying, This man is not from God, because He does not keep the Sabbath But others were saying, How can a man who is a sinner perform such signs? And there was a division among them. 17 So they said to the blind man again, What do you say about Him, since He opened your eyes? And he said, He is a prophet. 18 The Jews then did not believe it of him, that he had been blind and had received sight, until they called the parents of the very one who had received his sight, 19 and questioned them, saying, Is this your son, who you say was born blind? Then how does he now see? 20 His parents answered them and said, We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind; 21 but how he now sees, we do not know; or who opened his eyes, we do not know. Ask him; he is of age, he will speak for himself. 22 His parents said this because they were afraid of the Jews; for the Jews had already agreed that if anyone confessed Him to be Christ, he was to be put out of the synagogue. 23 For this reason his parents said, He is of age; ask him. 24 So a second time they called the man who had been blind, and said to him, Give glory to God; we know that this man is a sinner. 25 He then answered, Whether He is a sinner, I do not know; one thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see. These verses show us how little the Jews of our Lords time understood the right use of the Sabbath day. We read that some of the Pharisees found fault because a blind man was miraculously healed on the Sabbath. They said, This man is not of God, because He keeps not the Sabbath day. A good work had manifestly been done to a helpless fellow-creature. A heavy bodily infirmity had been removed. A mighty act of mercy had been performed. But the blind-hearted enemies of Christ could see no beauty in the act. They called it a breach of the Fourth Commandment! These would-be wise men completely mistook the intention of the Sabbath. They did not see that it was made for man, and meant for the good of mans body, mind, and soul. It was a day to be set apart from others, no doubt, and to be carefully sanctified and kept holy. But its sanctification was never intended to prevent works of necessity and acts of mercy. To heal a sick man was no breach of the Sabbath day. In finding fault with our Lord for so doing, the Jews only exposed their ignorance of their own law. They had forgotten that it is as great a sin to add to a commandment, as to take it away.    Here, as in other places, we must take care that we do not put a wrong meaning on our Lords conduct. We must not for a moment suppose that the Sabbath is no longer binding on Christians, and that they have nothing to do with the Fourth Commandment. This is a great mistake, and the root of great evil. Not one of the ten commandments has ever been repealed or put aside. Our Lord never meant the Sabbath to become a day of pleasure, or a day of business, or a day of traveling and idle dissipation. He meant it to be kept holy as long as the world stands. It is one thing to employ the Sabbath in works of mercy, in ministering to the sick, and doing good to the distressed. It is quite another thing to spend the day in visiting, feasting, and self-indulgence. Whatever men may please to say, the way in which we use the Sabbath a sure test of the state of our religion. By the Sabbath may be found out whether we love communion with God. By the Sabbath may be found out whether we are in tune for heaven. By the Sabbath, in short, the secrets of many hearts are revealed. There are only too many of whom we may say with sorrow, These men are not of God, because they keep not the Sabbath day. * These verses show us, secondly, the desperate lengths to which prejudice will sometimes carry wicked men. We read that the Jews agreed that if any man did confess that Jesus was Christ, he should be put out of the synagogue. They were determined not to believe. They were resolved that no evidence should change their minds, and no proofs influence their will. They were like men who shut their eyes and tie a bandage over them, and refuse to have it untied. Just as in after times they stopped their ears when Stephen preached, and refused to listen when Paul made his defense, so they behaved at this period of our Lords ministry. Of all states of mind into which unconverted men can fall, this is by far the most dangerous to the soul. So long as a person is open, fair, and honest-minded, there is hope for him, however ignorant he may be. He may be much in the dark at present. But is he willing to follow the light, if set before him? He may be walking in the broad road with all his might. But is he ready to listen to any one who will show him a more excellent way? In a word, is he teachable, childlike, and unfettered by prejudice? If these questions can be answered satisfactorily, we never need despair about the mans soul. The state of mind we should always desire to possess is that of the noble-minded Bereans. When they first heard the Apostle Paul preach, they listened with attention. They received the Word with all readiness of mind. They searched the Scriptures, and compared what they heard with Gods Word. And therefore, we are told, many of them believed. Happy are those who go and do likewise! (Acts xvii. 11, 12.) These verses show us, lastly, that nothing convinces a man so thoroughly as his own senses and feelings. We read that the unbelieving Jews tried in vain to persuade the blind man whom Jesus healed, that nothing had been done for him. They only got from him one plain answer: One thing I know, that whereas I was blind, now I see. How the miracle had been worked, he did not pretend to explain. Whether the person who had healed him was a sinner, he did not profess to know. But that something had been done for him he stoutly maintained. He was not to be reasoned out of his senses. Whatever the Jews might think, there were two distinct facts of which he was conscious: I was blind: now I see. There is no kind of evidence so satisfactory as this to the heart of a real Christian. His knowledge may be small. His faith may be feeble. His doctrinal views may be at present confused and indistinct. But if Christ has really wrought a work of grace in his heart by His Spirit, he feels within him something that you cannot overthrow. I was dark, and now I have light. I was afraid of God, and now I love Him. I was fond of sin, and now I hate it. I was blind, and now I see. Let us never rest until we know and feel within us some real work of the Holy Ghost. Let us not be content with the name and form of Christianity. Let us desire to have true experimental acquaintance with it. Feelings no doubt, are deceitful, and are not everything in religion. But if we have no inward feelings about spiritual matters, it is a very bad sign. The hungry man eats, and feels strengthened; the thirsty man drinks, and feels refreshed. Surely the man who has within him the grace of God, ought to be able to say, I feel its power. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). * Once again, Ryles sabbatarianism comes through, and, as noted before, I disagree. Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 15, 2010

Lords Day 22, 2010

Sunday··2010·05·30
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Conflict John Mason (16451694) Oh, what a war is in my soul, which fain would be devout! I am most weary with the fight, but may not yet give out. The flesh and spirit both contend for this weak soul of mine, That oft I know not what to do; but, Lord, I would be Thine. I would believe, but unbelief prevails the other way; And I have constant cause for grief, a longer night than day. I cry to God; those cries declare whose part my soul does take; Accept my poor desires while I do this resistance make. My evidences should be clear; but, ah, the blots of sin Turn cheering hope to saddening fear and make black doubts within. The laws of sin and grace will jar both dwelling in one room, The saints expect perpetual war till ye are sent for home. Although these combats make you fear they should not cast you down; God will give grace to hold out here, and glory for its crown. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 11:716Then after this He said to the disciples, Let us go to Judea again. 8 The disciples said to Him, Rabbi, the Jews were just now seeking to stone You, and are You going there again? 9 Jesus answered, Are there not twelve hours in the day? If anyone walks in the day, he does not stumble, because he sees the light of this world. 10 But if anyone walks in the night, he stumbles, because the light is not in him. 11 This He said, and after that He said to them, Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep; but I go, so that I may awaken him out of sleep. 12 The disciples then said to Him, Lord, if he has fallen asleep, he will recover. 13 Now Jesus had spoken of his death, but they thought that He was speaking of literal sleep. 14 So Jesus then said to them plainly, Lazarus is dead, 15 and I am glad for your sakes that I was not there, so that you may believe; but let us go to him. 16 Therefore Thomas, who is called Didymus, said to his fellow disciples, Let us also go, so that we may die with Him.    We should notice, in this passage, how mysterious are the ways in which Christ sometimes leads His people. We are told that when He talked of going back to Jud?a, His disciples were perplexed. It was the very place where the Jews had lately tried to stone their Master: to return there was to plunge into the midst of danger. These timid Galileans could not see the necessity or prudence of such a step. Thou goest thither again? they cried. Things such as these are often going on around us. The servants of Christ are often placed in circumstances just as puzzling and perplexing as those of the disciples. They are led in ways of which they cannot see the purpose and object; they are called to fill positions from which they naturally shrink, and which they would never have chosen for themselves. Thousands in every age are continually learning this by their own experience. The path they are obliged to walk in is not the path of their own choice. At present they cannot see its usefulness or wisdom. At times like these a Christian must call into exercise his faith and patience. He must believe that his Master knows best by what road His servant ought to travel, and that He is leading him, by the right way, to a city of habitation. He may rest assured that the circumstances in which be is placed are precisely those which are most likely to promote his graces and to check his besetting sins. He need not doubt that what he cannot see now, he will understand hereafter. He will find one day that there was wisdom in every step of his journey, though flesh and blood could not see it at the time. If the twelve disciples had not been taken back into Jud?a, they would not have seen the glorious miracle of Bethany. If Christians were allowed to choose their own course through life, they would never learn hundreds of lessons about Christ and His grace, which they are now taught in Gods ways. Let us remember these things. The time may come when we shall be called to take some journey in life which we greatly dislike. When that time comes, let us set out cheerfully, and believe that all is right. We should notice, secondly, in this passage, how tenderly Christ speaks of the death of believers. He announces the fact of Lazarus being dead in language of singular beauty and gentleness: Our friend Lazarus sleepeth. Every true Christian has a Friend in heaven, of almighty power and boundless love. He is thought of, cared for, provided for, defended by Gods eternal Son. He has an unfailing Protector, who never slumbers or sleeps, and watches continually over his interests. The world may despise him, but he has no cause to be ashamed. Father and mother even may cast him out, but Christ having once taken him up will never let him go. He is the friend of Christ even after he is dead! The friendships of this world are often fair-weather friendships, and fail us like summer-dried fountains, when our need is the sorest; but the friendship of the Son of God is stronger than death, and goes beyond the grave. The Friend of sinners is a Friend that sticketh closer than a brother. The death of true Christians is sleep, and not annihilation. It is a solemn and miraculous change, no doubt, but not a change to be regarded with alarm. They have nothing to fear for their souls in the change, for their sins are washed away in Christs blood. The sharpest sting of death is the sense of unpardoned sin. Christians have nothing to fear for their bodies in the change; they will rise again by and by, refreshed and renewed, after the image of the Lord. The grave itself is a conquered enemy. It must render back its tenants safe and sound, the very moment that Christ calls for them at the last day. Let us remember these things when those whom we love fall asleep in Christ, or when we ourselves receive our notice to depart this world. Let us call to mind, in such an hour, that our great Friend takes thought for our bodies as well as for our souls, and that He will not allow one hair of our heads to perish. Let us never forget that the grave is the place where the Lord Himself lay, and that as He rose again triumphant from that cold bed, so also shall all His people. To a mere worldly man death must needs be a terrible thing; but he that has Christian faith may boldly say, as he lays down life, I will lay me down in peace, and take my rest: for it is Thou, Lord, that makest me dwell in safety. We should notice, lastly, in this passage, how much of natural temperament clings to a believer even after conversion. We read that when Thomas saw that Lazarus was dead, and that Jesus was determined, in spite of all danger, to return into Jud?a, he said, Let us also go, that we may die with Him. There can only be one meaning in that expression: it was the language of a despairing and desponding mind, which could see nothing but dark clouds in the picture. The very man who afterwards could not believe that his Master had risen again, and thought the news too good to be true, is just the one of the twelve who thinks that if they go back to Jud?a they must all die! Things such as these are deeply instructive, and are doubtless recorded for our learning. They show us that the grace of God in conversion does not so re-mold a man as to leave no trace of his natural bent of character. The sanguine do not altogether cease to be sanguine, nor the desponding to be desponding, when they pass from death to life, and become true Christians. They show us that we must make large allowances for natural temperament, in forming our estimate of individual Christians. We must not expect all Gods children to be exactly one and the same. Each tree in a forest has its own peculiarities of shape and growth, and yet all at a distance look one mass of leaf and verdure. Each member of Christs body has his own distinctive bias, and yet all in the main are led by one Spirit, and love one Lord. The two sisters Martha and Mary, the apostles Peter and John and Thomas, were certainly very unlike one another in many respects. But they had all one point in common: they loved Christ, and were His friends. Let us take heed that we really belong to Christ. This is the one thing needful. If this is made sure, we shall be led by the right way, and end well at last. We may not have the cheerfulness of one brother, or the fiery zeal of another, or the gentleness of another. But if grace reigns within us, and we know what repentance and faith are by experience, we shall stand on the right hand in the great day. Happy is the man of whom, with all his defects, Christ says to saints and angels, This is our friend. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 22, 2010

Lord���s Day 26, 2010

Sunday··2010·06·27
I was glad when they said to me, ���Let us go to the house of the Lord.��� The Excellencies of Christ Samuel Stennett (1727���1795) To Christ, the Lord, let every tongue Its noblest tribute bring; When He���s the subject of the song, Who can refuse to sing? Survey the beauties of His face, And on His glories dwell; Think of the wonders of His grace, And all His triumphs tell. Majestic sweetness sits enthroned, Upon His awful brow; His head with radiant glories crowned, His lips with grace o���erflow. No mortal can with Him compare, Among the sons of men; Fairer is he than all the fair, That fill the heavenly train. He saw me plunged in deep distress, He flew to my relief; For me He bore the shameful cross, And carried all my grief. His hand a thousand blessings pours Upon my guilty head; His presence guilds my darkest hours, And guards my sleeping bed. To Him I owe my life, and breath, And all the joys I have; He makes me triumph over death, And saves me from the grave. To heaven, the place of His abode, He brings my weary feet; Shows me the glories of my God, And makes my joys complete. Since from His bounty I receive Such proofs of love divine, Had I a thousand hearts to give, Lord, they should all be thine! ���Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 11:47���57Therefore the chief priests and the Pharisees convened a council, and were saying, ���What are we doing? For this man is performing many signs. 48 If we let Him go on like this, all men will believe in Him, and the Romans will come and take away both our place and our nation.��� 49 But one of them, Caiaphas, who was high priest that year, said to them, ���You know nothing at all, 50 nor do you take into account that it is expedient for you that one man die for the people, and that the whole nation not perish.��� 51 Now he did not say this on his own initiative, but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus was going to die for the nation, 52 and not for the nation only, but in order that He might also gather together into one the children of God who are scattered abroad. 53 So from that day on they planned together to kill Him. 54 Therefore Jesus no longer continued to walk publicly among the Jews, but went away from there to the country near the wilderness, into a city called Ephraim; and there He stayed with the disciples. 55 Now the Passover of the Jews was near, and many went up to Jerusalem out of the country before the Passover to purify themselves. 56 So they were seeking for Jesus, and were saying to one another as they stood in the temple, ���What do you think; that He will not come to the feast at all?��� 57 Now the chief priests and the Pharisees had given orders that if anyone knew where He was, he was to report it, so that they might seize Him.    These concluding verses of the eleventh chapter of John contain a melancholy picture of human nature. As we turn away from Jesus Christ and the grave at Bethany, and look at Jerusalem and the rulers of the Jews, we may well say, ���Lord, what is man?��� We should observe, for one thing, in these verses, the desperate wickedness of man���s natural heart. A mighty miracle was wrought within an easy walk of Jerusalem. A man four days dead was raised to life, in the sight of many witnesses. The fact was unmistakable, and could not be denied; and yet the chief priests and Pharisees would not believe that He who did this miracle ought to be received as the Messiah. In the face of overwhelming evidence they shut their eyes, and refused to be convinced. ���This man,��� they admitted, ���does many miracles.��� But so far from yielding to this testimony, they only plunged into further wickedness, and ���took counsel to put Him to death.��� Great, indeed, is the power of unbelief! Let us beware of supposing that miracles alone have any power to convert men���s souls, and to make them Christians. The idea is a complete delusion. To fancy, as some do, that if they saw something wonderful done before their eyes in confirmation of the Gospel, they would at once cast off all indecision and serve Christ, is a mere idle dream. It is the grace of the Spirit in our hearts, and not miracles, that our souls require. The Jews of our Lord���s day are a standing proof to mankind that men may see signs and wonders, and yet remain hard as stone. It is a deep and true saying, ���If men believe not Moses and the Prophets, neither would they be persuaded though one rose from the dead.��� (Luke xvi. 31.) We must never wonder if we see abounding unbelief in our own times, and around our own homes. It may seem at first unexplainable to us, how men cannot see the truth which seems so clear to ourselves, and do not receive the Gospel which appears so worthy of acceptance. But the plain truth is, that man���s unbelief is a far more deeply seated disease than it is generally reckoned. It is proof against the logic of facts, against reasoning, against argument, against moral persuasion. Nothing can melt it down but the grace of God. If we ourselves believe, we can never be too thankful. But we must never count it a strange thing, if we see many of our fellows just as hardened and unbelieving as the Jews. We should observe, for another thing, the blind ignorance with which God���s enemies often act and reason. These rulers of the Jews said to one another, ���If we let this Christ alone we shall be ruined. If we do not stop His course, and make an end of His miracles, the Romans will interfere, and make an end of our nation.��� Never, the event afterward proved, was there a more short-sighted and erring judgment than this. They rushed madly on the path they had chosen, and the very thing they feared came to pass. They did not leave our Lord alone, but crucified and slew Him. And what happened then? After a few years, the very calamity they had dreaded took place: the Roman armies did come, destroyed Jerusalem, burned the temple, and carried away the whole nation into captivity. The well-read Christian need hardly be reminded of many such like things in the history of Christ���s Church. The Roman emperors persecuted the Christians in the first three centuries, and thought it a positive duty not to let them alone. But the more they persecuted them, the more they increased. The blood of the martyrs became the seed of the Church.���The English Papists, in the days of Queen Mary, persecuted the Protestants, and thought that truth was in danger if they were let alone. But the more they burned our forefathers, the more they confirmed men���s minds in steadfast attachment to the doctrines of the Reformation.���In short, the words of the second Psalm are continually verified in this world: ���The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together against the Lord.��� But ���He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh; the Lord shall have them in derision.��� God can make the designs of His enemies work together for the good of His people, and cause the wrath of man to praise Him. In days of trouble, and rebuke, and blasphemy, believers may rest patiently in the Lord. The very things that at one time seem likely to hurt them, shall prove in the end to be for their gain. We should observe, lastly, what importance bad men sometimes attach to outward ceremonial, while their hearts are full of sin. We are told that many Jews ���went up out of the country to Jerusalem, before the Passover, to purify themselves.��� The most of them, it may be feared, neither knew nor cared anything about inward purity of heart. They made much ado about the washings, and fastings, and ascetic observances, which formed the essence of popular Jewish religion in our Lord���s time; and yet they were willing in a very few days to shed innocent blood. Strange as it may appear, these very sticklers for outward ceremonies were found ready to do the will of the Pharisees, and to put their own Messiah to a violent death. Extremes like this meeting together in the same person are, unhappily, far from uncommon. Experience shows that a bad conscience will often try to satisfy itself, by a show of zeal for the cause of religion, while the ���weightier matters��� of the faith are entirely neglected. The very same man who is ready to compass sea and land to attain ceremonial purity is often the very man, who, if he had fit opportunity, would not shrink from helping to crucify Christ. Startling as these assertions may seem, they are abundantly borne out by plain facts. The cities where Lent is kept at this day with the most extravagant strictness are the very cities where the carnival after Lent is a season of glaring excess and immorality. The people in some parts of Christendom, who make much ado one week about fasting and priestly absolution, are the very people who another week will think nothing of murder! These things are simple realities. The hideous inconsistency of the Jewish formalists in our Lord���s time has never been without a long succession of followers. Let us settle it firmly in our minds that a religion which expends itself in zeal for outward formalities is utterly worthless in God���s sight. The purity that God desires to see is not the purity of bodily washing and fasting, of holy water and self-imposed asceticism, but purity of heart. External worship and ceremonialism may ���satisfy the flesh,��� but they do not tend to promote real godliness. The standard of Christ���s kingdom must be sought in the sermon on the Mount: ���Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.��� (Matt. v. 8; Col. ii. 23.) ���J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. 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continue reading Lord���s Day 26, 2010

Lords Day 35, 2010

Sunday··2010·08·29
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Recovered from the Tomb Mather Byles (17061788) To Thee, my Lord, I lift the song, Awake, my tuneful powers; In constant praise my grateful tongue Shall fill my following hours. Guilty, condemned, undone I stood; I bid my God depart. He took my sins, and paid His blood, And turned this wandering heart. Death, the grim tyrant, seized my frame, Vile, loathsome, accursed; His breath renews the vital flame, And glories change the dust. Now, Savior, shall Thy praise commence; My soul by Thee brought home, And every member, every sense, Recovered from the tomb. To Thee my reason I submit, My love, my memory, Lord, My eyes to read, my hands to write, My lips to preach Thy Word. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 13:615 So He came to Simon Peter. He said to Him, Lord, do You wash my feet? 7 Jesus answered and said to him, What I do you do not realize now, but you will understand hereafter. 8 Peter said to Him, Never shall You wash my feet! Jesus answered him, If I do not wash you, you have no part with Me. 9 Simon Peter said to Him, Lord, then wash not only my feet, but also my hands and my head. 10 Jesus said to him, He who has bathed needs only to wash his feet, but is completely clean; and you are clean, but not all of you. 11 For He knew the one who was betraying Him; for this reason He said, Not all of you are clean. 12 So when He had washed their feet, and taken His garments and reclined at the table again, He said to them, Do you know what I have done to you? 13 You call Me Teacher and Lord; and you are right, for so I am. 14 If I then, the Lord and the Teacher, washed your feet, you also ought to wash one anothers feet. 15 For I gave you an example that you also should do as I did to you.    The verses we have now read conclude the story of our Lords washing the feet of His disciples, the night before He was crucified. It is a story full of touching interest, which for some wise reason no Evangelist records except St. John. The wonderful condescension of Christ, in doing such a menial action, can hardly fail to strike any reader. The mere fact that the Master should wash the feet of the servants might well fill us with surprise. But the circumstances and sayings which arose out of the action are just as interesting as the action itself. Let us see what they were. We should notice, firstly, the hasty ignorance of the Apostle Peter. One moment we find him refusing to allow his Master to do such a servile work as He is about to do:Dost thou wash my feet? Thou shalt never wash my feet. Another moment we find him rushing with characteristic impetuosity into the other extreme:Lord, wash not my feet only, but my hands and my head. But throughout the transaction we find him unable to take in the real meaning of what his eyes behold. He sees, but he does not understand. Let us learn from Peters conduct that a man may have plenty of faith and love, and yet be sadly destitute of clear knowledge. We must not set down men as graceless and godless because they are dull, and stupid, and blundering in their religion. The heart may often be quite right when the head is quite wrong. We must make allowances for the corruption of the understanding, as well as of the will. We must not be surprised to find that the brains as well as the affections of Adams children have been hurt by the fall. It is a humbling lesson, and one seldom fully learned except by long experience. But the longer we live the more true shall we find it, that a believer, like Peter, may make many mistakes and lack understanding, and yet, like Peter, have a heart right before God, and get to heaven at last. Even at our best estate we shall find that many of Christs dealings with us are hard to understand in this life. The why and wherefore of many a providence will often puzzle and perplex us quite as much as the washing puzzled Peter. The wisdom, and fitness, and necessity of many a thing will often be hidden from our eyes. But at times like these we must remember the Masters words, and fall back upon them:What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter. There came days, long after Christ had left the world, when Peter saw the full meaning of all that happened on the memorable night before the crucifixion. Even so there will be a day when every dark page in our lifes history will be explained, and when, as we stand with Christ in glory, we shall know all. We should notice, secondly, in this passage, the plain practical lesson which lies upon its surface. That lesson is read out to us by our Lord. He says, I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. Humility is evidently one part of the lesson. If the only-begotten Son of God, the King of kings, did not think it beneath Him to do the humblest work of a servant, there is nothing which His disciples should think themselves too great or too good to do. No sin is so offensive to God, and so injurious to the soul as pride. No grace is so commended, both by precept and example, as humility. Be clothed with humility. He that humbleth himself shall be exalted.Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus; who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: but made Himself of no reputation, and took upon Him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: and being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself. (1 Pet. v. 5; Luke xviii 14; Phil. ii. 58.) Well would it be for the Church if this very simple truth was more remembered, and real humility was not so sadly rare. Perhaps there is no sight so displeasing in Gods eyes as a self-conceited, self-satisfied, self-contented, stuck-up professor of religion. Alas, it is a sight only too common! Yet the words which St. John here records have never been repealed. They will be a swift witness against many at the last day, except they repent. Love is manifestly the other part of the great practical lesson. Our Lord would have us love others so much that we should delight to do anything which can promote their happiness. We ought to rejoice in doing kindnesses, even in little things. We ought to count it a pleasure to lessen sorrow and multiply joy, even when it costs us some self-sacrifice and self-denial. We ought to love every child of Adam so well, that if in the least trifle we can do anything to make him more happy and comfortable, we should be glad to do it. This was the mind of the Master, and this the ruling principle of His conduct upon earth. There are but few who walk in His steps, it may be feared; but these few are men and women after His own heart. The lesson before us may seem a very simple one; but its importance can never be overrated. Humility and love are precisely the graces which the men of the world can understand, if they do not comprehend doctrines. They are graces about which there is no mystery, and they are within reach of all Christians. The poorest and most ignorant Christian can every day find occasion for practicing love and humility. Then if we would do good to the world, and make our calling and election sure, let no man forget our Lords example in this passage. Like Him, let us be humble and loving towards all. We should notice, lastly, in this passage, the deep spiritual lessons which lie beneath its surface. They are three in number, and lie at the very root of religion, though we can only touch them briefly. For one thing, we learn that all need to be washed by Christ. If I wash thee not, thou hast no part in Me. No man or woman can be saved unless his sins are washed away in Christs precious blood. Nothing else can make us clean or acceptable before God. We must be washed, sanctified, and justified, in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God. (1 Cor. vi. 11.) Christ must wash us, if we are ever to sit down with saints in glory. Then let us take heed that we apply to Him by faith, wash and become clean. They only are washed who believe. For another thing, we learn that even those who are cleansed and forgiven need a daily application to the blood of Christ for daily pardon. We cannot pass through this evil world without defilement. There is not a day in our lives but we fail and come short in many things, and need fresh supplies of mercy. Even he that is washed needs to wash his feet, and to wash them in the same fountain where he found peace of conscience when he first believed. Then let us daily use that fountain without fear. With the blood of Christ we must begin, and with the blood of Christ we must go on. Finally, we learn that even those who kept company with Christ, and were baptized with water as His disciples, were not all washed from their sin. These words are very solemn,Ye are clean: but not all. Then let us take heed to ourselves, and beware of false profession. If even Christs own disciples are not all cleansed and justified, we have reason to be on our guard. Baptism and Churchmanship are no proof that we are right in the sight of God. J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. 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continue reading Lords Day 35, 2010

Lord’s Day 43, 2010

Sunday··2010·10·24
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Christ the Beloved Samuel Davies (1723–1761) Let others let their passions rove Round all the earth, from shore to shore; Since Jesus is my friend and love, My utmost wish can grasp no more. His glories have allured my eye, And into love transformed my heart; To Him my tenderest passions fly; Jesus, nor shall they e’er depart. Upon His friendship I rely, Still of His tender care secure; My wants are all before His eye! Nor can they overcome His pow’r. His presence fills unbounded space; My heavenly friend is always nigh. Full of compassion, rich in grace; Touched with the tenderest sympathy. Faithful and constant is His love, And my ungrateful conduct hides; Safe to the happy world above, The meanest of His friends He guides. Amid the agonies of death, and terrors of the final doom, He saves them from almighty wrath, And leads the helpless pilgrims home. Oh, may an everlasting flame Of love possess my grateful mind! And my last breath adore His name, Who condescends to be my friend! —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). John 14:21–26 He who has My commandments and keeps them is the one who loves Me; and he who loves Me will be loved by My Father, and I will love him and will disclose Myself to him.” 22 Judas (not Iscariot) said to Him, “Lord, what then has happened that You are going to disclose Yourself to us and not to the world?” 23 Jesus answered and said to him, “If anyone loves Me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our abode with him. 24 He who does not love Me does not keep My words; and the word which you hear is not Mine, but the Father’s who sent Me. 25 These things I have spoken to you while abiding with you. 26 But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I said to you.” We learn from these verses that keeping Christ’s commandments is the best test of love to Christ. This is a lesson of vast importance and one that needs continually pressing on the attention of Christians. It is not talking about religion, and talking fluently and well too, but steadily doing Christ’s will and walking in Christ’s ways, that is the proof of our being true believers. Good feelings and desires are useless if they are not accompanied by action. They may even become mischievous to the soul, induce hardness of conscience, and do certain harm. Passive impressions which do not lead to action, gradually deaden and paralyze the heart. Living and doing are the only real evidence of grace. Where the Holy Ghost is, there will always be a holy life. A jealous watchfulness over tempers, words, and deeds, a constant endeavor to live by the rule of the Sermon on the Mount, this is the best proof that we love Christ. Of course such maxims as these must not be wrested and misunderstood. We are not to suppose for a moment that “keeping Christ’s commandments” can save us. Our best works are full of imperfection. When we have done all we can, we are feeble and unprofitable servants. “By grace are you saved through faith,—not of works.” (Ep. ii. 8.) But while we hold one class of truths, we must not forget another. Faith in the blood of Christ must always be attended by loving obedience to the will of Christ. What the Master has joined together, the disciple must not put asunder. Do we profess to love Christ? Then let us show it by our lives. The Apostle who said, “You know that I love You!” received the charge, “Feed my lambs.” That meant, “Do something. Be useful: follow my example.” (John xxii. 17.) We learn, secondly, from these verses, that there are special comforts laid up for those who love Christ, and prove it by keeping His words. This, at any rate, seems the general sense of our Lord’s language: “My Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him.” The full meaning of this promise, no doubt, is a deep thing. We have no line to fathom it. It is a thing which no man can understand except he that receives and experiences it. But we need not shrink from believing that eminent holiness brings eminent comfort with it, and that no man has such sensible enjoyment of his religion as the man who, like Enoch and Abraham, walks closely with God. There is more of heaven on earth to be obtained than most Christians are aware of. “The secret of the Lord is with them who fear Him, and He will show them His covenant.”—“If any man hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to him, and sup with him, and he with Me.” (Ps. xxv. 14; Rev. iii. 20.) Promises like these, we may be sure, mean something, and were not written in vain. How is it, people often ask, that so many professing believers have so little happiness in their religion? How is it that so many know little of “joy and peace in believing,” and go mourning and heavy-hearted towards heaven? The answer to these questions is a sorrowful one, but it must be given. Few believers attend as strictly as they should to Christ’s practical sayings and words. There is far too much loose and careless obedience to Christ’s commandments. There is far too much forgetfulness, that while good works cannot justify us they are not to be despised. Let these things sink down into our hearts. If we want to be eminently happy, we must strive to be eminently holy. We learn, lastly, from these verses, that one part of the Holy Ghost’s work is to teach, and to bring things to remembrance. It is written, “The Comforter shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance.” To confine this promise to the eleven Apostles, as some do, seems a narrow and unsatisfactory mode of interpreting Scripture. It appears to reach far beyond the day of Pentecost, and the gift of writing inspired books of God’s Holy Word. It is safer, wiser, and more consistent with the whole tone of our Lord’s last discourse, to regard the promise as the common property of all believers, in every age of the world. Our Lord knows the ignorance and forgetfulness of our nature in spiritual things. He graciously declares that when He leaves the world, His people shall have a teacher and remembrancer. Are we sensible of spiritual ignorance? Do we feel that at best we know in part and see in part? Do we desire to understand more clearly the doctrines of the Gospel? Let us pray daily for the help of the “teaching” Spirit. It is His office to illuminate the soul, to open the eyes of the understanding, and to guide us into all truth. He can make dark places light, and rough places smooth. Do we find our memory of spiritual things defective? Do we complain that though we read and hear, we seem to lose as fast as we gain? Let us pray daily for the help of the Holy Ghost. He can bring things to our remembrance. He can make us remember “old things and new.” He can keep in our minds the whole system of truth and duty, and make us ready for every good word and work. —J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Baker Books, 2007) [Westminster (PB) | Amazon (HC)]. Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lord’s Day 43, 2010

Lord’s Day 14, 2011

Sunday··2011·04·03 · 1 Comments
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Appeal to Christ for Sincerity of Love to Him Philip Doddridge (1702—1751) Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? Behold my heart and see; And turn each cursed idol out, That dares to rival Thee. Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? Then let me nothing love; Dead be my heart to every joy, When Jesus cannot move. Is not Thy Name melodious still To mine attentive ear? Doth not each pulse with pleasure bound My Savior’s voice to hear? Hast Thou a lamb in all Thy flock I would disdain to feed? Hast Thou a foe, before whose face I fear Thy cause to plead? Would not mine ardent spirit vie With angels round the throne, To execute Thy sacred will, And make Thy glory known? Would not my heart pour forth its blood In honor of Thy Name? And challenge the cold hand of death To damp the immortal flame? Thou knowest I love Thee, dearest Lord, But O, I long to soar Far from the sphere of mortal joys, And learn to love Thee more. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). The Gospel According to John 20 Now on the first day of the week Mary Magdalene came early to the tomb, while it was still dark, and saw the stone already taken away from the tomb. 2 So she ran and came to Simon Peter and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken away the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid Him.” 3 So Peter and the other disciple went forth, and they were going to the tomb. 4 The two were running together; and the other disciple ran ahead faster than Peter and came to the tomb first; 5 and stooping and looking in, he saw the linen wrappings lying there; but he did not go in. 6 And so Simon Peter also came, following him, and entered the tomb; and he saw the linen wrappings lying there, 7 and the face-cloth which had been on His head, not lying with the linen wrappings, but rolled up in a place by itself. 8 So the other disciple who had first come to the tomb then also entered, and he saw and believed. 9 For as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that He must rise again from the dead. 10 So the disciples went away again to their own homes. The chapter we have now begun takes us from Christ’s death to Christ’s resurrection. Like Matthew, Mark, and Luke, John dwells on these two great events with peculiar fullness and particularity. And we need not wonder. The whole of saving Christianity hinges on the two facts, that Christ died for our sins, and rose again for our justification. The chapter before our eyes deserves special attention. Of all the four evangelists, none supplies such deeply interesting evidence of the resurrection, as the disciple whom Jesus loved. We are taught in the passage before us, that those who love Christ most are those who have received most benefit from him. The first whom St. John names among those who came to Christ’s sepulcher, is Mary Magdalene. The history of this faithful woman, no doubt, is hidden in much obscurity. A vast amount of needless ridicule has been heaped upon her memory, as if she was once an habitual sinner against the seventh commandment. Yet there is literally no evidence whatever that she was anything of the kind! But we are distinctly told that she was one out of whom the Lord had cast “seven devils” (Mark xvi. 9; Luke viii. 2),—one who had been subjected in a peculiar way to Satan’s possession,—and one whose gratitude to our Lord for deliverance was a gratitude that knew no bounds. In short, of all our Lord’s followers on earth, none seem to have loved Him so much as Mary Magdalene. None felt that they owed so much to Christ. None felt so strongly that there was nothing too great to do for Christ. Hence, as Andrews beautifully puts it,—“She was last at His cross, and first at His grave. She stayed longest there, and was soonest here. She could not rest until she was up to seek Him. She sought Him while it was yet dark, even before she had light to seek Him by.” In a word, having received much, she loved much; and loving much, she did much, in order to prove the reality of her love. The case before us throws broad and clear light on a question, which ought to be deeply interesting to every true-hearted servant of Christ. How is it that many who profess and call themselves Christians, do so little for the Saviour whose name they bear? How is it that many, whose faith and grace it would be uncharitable to deny, work so little, give so little, say so little, take so little pains, to promote Christ’s cause, and bring glory to Christ in the world? These questions admit of only one answer. It is a low sense of debt and obligation to Christ, which is the account of the whole matter. Where sin is not felt at all, nothing is done; and where sin is little felt, little is done. The man who is deeply conscious of his own guilt and corruption, and deeply convinced that without the death and intercession of Christ he would sink deservedly into the lowest hell, this is the man who will spend and be spent for Jesus, and think that he can never do enough to show forth His praise. Let us daily pray that we may see the sinfulness of sin, and the amazing grace of Christ, more clearly and distinctly. Then, and then only, shall we cease to be cool, and lukewarm, and slovenly in our work for Jesus. Then, and then only, shall we understand such burning zeal as that of Mary; and comprehend what Paul meant when he said, “The love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge that if One died for all, then were all dead: and that He died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto Him which died for them, and rose again.” (2 Cor. v. 14, 15.)We are taught, secondly, in these verses, that there are widely different temperaments in different believers. This is a point which is curiously brought out in the conduct of Peter and John, when Mary Magdalene told them that the Lord’s body was gone. We are told that they both ran to the sepulcher; but John, the disciple whom Jesus loved, outran Peter, and reached the empty grave first. Then comes out the difference between the two men. John, of the two more gentle, quiet, tender, reserved, retiring, deep-feeling, stooped down and looked in, but went no further. Peter, more hot, and zealous, and impulsive, and fervent, and forward, cannot be content without going down into the sepulcher, and actually seeing with his own eyes. Both, we may be sure, were deeply attached to our Lord. The hearts of both, at this critical juncture, were full of hopes, and fears, and anxieties, and expectations, all tangled together. Yet each behaves in his own characteristic fashion. We need not doubt that these things were intentionally written for our learning. Let us learn, from the case before us, to make allowances for wide varieties in the inward character of believers. To do so will save us much trouble in the journey of life, and prevent many an uncharitable thought. Let us not judge brethren harshly, and set them down in a low place, because they do not see or feel things exactly as we see and feel, and because things do not affect or strike them just as they affect and strike us. The flowers in the Lord’s garden are not all of one color and one scent, though they are all planted by one Spirit. The subjects of His kingdom are not all exactly of one tone and temperament, though they all love the same Saviour, and are written in the same book of life. The Church of Christ has some in its ranks who are like Peter, and some who are like John; and a place for all, and a work for all to do. Let us love all who love Christ in sincerity, and thank God that they love Him at all. The great thing is to love Jesus. We are taught, finally, in these verses, that there may be much ignorance even in true believers. This is a point which is brought out here with singular force and distinctness. John himself, the writer of this Gospel, records of himself and his companion Peter, “As yet they knew not the Scripture, that He must rise again from the dead.” How truly incredible this seems! For three long years these two leading Apostles had heard our Lord speak of His own resurrection as a fact, and yet they had not understood Him. Again and again He had staked the truth of His Messiahship on His rising from the dead, and yet they had never taken in His meaning. We little realize the power over the mind which is exercised by wrong teaching in childhood, and by early prejudices imbibed in our youth. Surely the Christian minister has little right to complain of ignorance among his hearers, when he marks the ignorance of Peter and John, under the teaching of Christ Himself. After all we must remember that true grace, and not head knowledge, is the one thing needful. We are in the hands of a merciful and compassionate Saviour, who passes by and pardons much ignorance, when He sees “a heart right in the sight of God.” Some things indeed we must know, and without knowing them we cannot be saved. Our own sinfulness and guilt, the office of Christ as a Saviour, the necessity of repentance and faith,—such things as these are essential to salvation. But he that knows these things may, in other respects, be a very ignorant man. In fact, the extent to which one man may have grace together with much ignorance, and another may have much knowledge and yet no grace, is one of the greatest mysteries in religion, and one which the last day alone will unfold. Let us then seek knowledge, and be ashamed of ignorance. But above all let us make sure that, like Peter and John, we have grace and right hearts. —J. C. Ryle, Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (Banner of Truth, 2012). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lord’s Day 14, 2011

Lords Day 22, 2011

Sunday··2011·05·29
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Means of Grace, which God Has Appointed Philip Doddridge (17021751) What kind provision God has made, That we may safe to heaven be led! For this the prophets preachd and wrote, For this the blessd apostles taught; Taught, as that Spirit did inspire, Who fell from heaven in tongues of fire, And gave them languages unknown, That distant lands his grace might own. His hand has kept the sacred page Secure from men and devils rage. For this, He ohurches did ordain, His truths and worship to maintain: For this, He pastors did provide, In those assemblies to preside: And from the round of common days Markd out our sabbaths to his praise. Delightful day, when Christians meet! To hear, and pray, and sing, how sweet! For this He gives, in solemn ways, Appointed tokens of his grace: In sacramental pledges there His soldiers to their General swear. Baptizd into one common Lord, They joyful meet around his board; Honour the orders of his house, And speak their love, and seal their vows. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). If youve been following these Lords Day posts, you know that weve finished The Gospel of John with J. C. Ryle. Now I need to decide on something else to fill this space. Suggestions are welcome.
continue reading Lords Day 22, 2011

Lords Day 29, 2011

Sunday··2011·07·17
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Assistance and Influence of the Blessed Spirit Philip Doddridge (17021751) Tis not in my weak powr alone, To melt this stubborn heart of stone, My soul to change, my life to mend, Or seek to Christ, that genrous friend. Tis Gods own Spirit from above Fixes our faith, inflames our love. And makes a life divine begin In wretched souls, long dead in sin. That most important gift of heaven To those that ask and seek is given; Then be it my immediate care With importunity of prayer, To seek it in a Saviors name, Who will not turn my hopes to shame. God from on high, His grace shall pour, My soul shall flourish more and more. Press on with speed from grace to grace, Till glory end and crown the race. Since then the Father and the Son, And Holy Spirit, three in one, Glorious beyond all speech and thought, Have jointly my salvation wrought; Ill join them in my songs of praise, Now and through heavens eternal days. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). But now apart from the Law the righteousness of God has been manifested, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets Romans 3:21 It is of sin and righteousness that the apostle speaks so fully and so minutely throughout this whole epistle. Up to the verse from which our text is taken, he has been settling this point, that man is a sinner, and needs a righteousness, else he cannot stand before God. Circumcision cannot give a righteousness; it merely tells us that a righteousness is needed, no more. The law cannot give a righteousness; it is merely a declaration of what righteousness is, and that the unrighteous shall not stand before God. It condemns, it cannot justify. By the law is the knowledge of sin, and thus every mouth is stopped, and the whole world brought in guilty before God. But, notwithstanding this, there is a righteousness; a righteousness which meets the case of the unrighteous in every part; a righteousness which can reverse even the verdict of the law against the unrighteous; a righteousness on the footing of which we can stand with boldness in the presence of the holy God without either shame or fear. It is of this righteousness that he proceeds to speak in the words of our text. Let us hear what he affirms regarding it. I. First, it is the righteousness of God. It is a divine, not a human righteousness. That righteousness which we had lost in Adam was, after all, but a human thing, finite hike him who lost it; but that which we gain is a divine righteousness, and by being divine, forms an infinite compensation for that which Adam lost for us; and we, in receiving it, are made partakers of a most glorious exchange. It is called the righteousness of God, because it is a righteousness provided by Him; a righteousness which was conceived by Him, set on foot, and carried out in every part by Him, entirely and by Him alone; a righteousness, in the providing of which we had nothing to do, even in thought or in desire, far less in execution; a righteousness, the origin and accomplishment of which are wholly and purely Gods, not mans at all. Again, it is called the righteousness of God, because it is a righteousness founded on the sufferings of the Son of God. It behoved Him, who is the only-begotten of the Father to take flesh and suffer, ere the very first step towards the providing of that righteousness could be taken. And He has suffered, the Just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God; and thus the foundation of a divine righteousness has been laid. Again, it is called the righteousness of God, because it is a righteousness made up of time doings of the Son of God. It is not merely with His sufferings that this righteousness has to do, but it is with His doings as well. These two things enter into its composition, so that, without both of them, it would be imperfect. What He did on earth in magnifying the law and making it honourable; what He did on earth in obeying the Fathers will in every jot and tittle, makes up this righteousness. These doings of His were infinitely pleasing to the Father, infinitely glorifying to the Fathers holiness, and infinitely honouring to that law which our unrighteousness had violated and dishonoured. Further, it is called the righteousness of God, because it provides such a compensation for human unrighteousness, that it not only takes it all away, but brings in a new and far higher and surer footing for the sinner to rest on. It introduces a new standing of acceptance, so that the man who becomes a partaker of this provided righteousness becomes divinely accepted, divinely righteous, divinely blessed. It is not a mere simple righteousness that God sets forth; it is a super abounding one, an infinite one, one which can leave no room for doubt on our part at all, one that is most amply sufficient to meet our case were we the very guiltiest on whom the sun has ever shone. II. Secondly, it is a righteousness without the law. He does not mean that it is in any sense an unlawful righteousness,a righteousness not based on law,a righteousness, in providing which, law has been set aside in any sense; but it means a righteousness which, in so far as we are concerned, has nothing to do with law at all. It is not a righteousness which asks any doing, or working, or obeying, on our part, in order to complete it, in order to make it what it isthe righteousness of God; for did it require anything of this kind on our part, it would cease to be what it is here represented to be, the righteousness of God, and would become, to a large extent at least, the righteousness of man. This righteousness does not send us to the law in order to be justified; it does not throw us upon our own works, either in whole or in part; it proceeds from first to last upon such principles as these, announced elsewhere in this epistle, and in the Epistle to the Galatians: By time deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified. And again, as it is written To him that worketh not, but believeth in Him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness. In no sense, and at no time, does it say to us, Do this, and thou shalt live; do this, and thou shalt be saved. In no sense does it give us the idea of a thing far off, but of a thing nigh, at our very side; not of a thing to be toiled for, a thing to be waited for on our part. In no such sense has this righteousness anything to do with law, or with our doing of the law. For what is the whole of the Epistle to the Galatians but a protest against the idea that this righteousness of God has anything to do with the law, in so far as the sinner is concerned? In so far as God is concerned, in so far as the Son of God is concerned, it had everything to do with law; but in so far as we are concerned, it has nothing to do with it; it is a righteousness without the law. Let us, brethren, hold fast then this truth of the gospel, this foundation truth; righteousness without law, righteousness founded in no sense upon our keeping of the law; but wholly and absolutely upon this fact, that another has kept the law for us, and that other no less than the Son of God Himself. III. Thirdly, This righteousness has been manifested acceptance. Now, he says, the righteousness of God is manifested; it has been clearly brought to light, so that there can be no mistake concerning it, and no mystery in it. It is not a thing hidden, wrapped up, reserved, held back, veiled from our view. It is a thing clearly brought out today, and shone upon by Gods own light, so that the difficulty seems to be, not how to see it, but how to miss seeing it, how to keep ourselves from apprehending it. It has been clearly manifested. God has been at infinite pains to bring it forward to view, both on our own account, and on account of Him whose righteousness it is. In every way He has sought to guard it against the possibility of being mistaken by man. In every way has He taken precautions against this being hidden from view, or darkened by the words of mans wisdom. He has set this righteousness as a star in the firmament above us, that every eye may see it, that no mountains of earth may come between us and the heavenly vision; He has made it peculiarly bright, that every eye may be attracted to it. He has removed other stars from around it, that it may not be mistaken, but stand alone in its brilliance. It is to this star we point the eye of each sinner here; the Star of Bethlehem, the brightest in Gods firmament, the bright and morning star, the star which God has set there as His light to the world. He presents it to each one of you, that on recognizing it you may not walk in darkness, but have the light of life, and that, knowing it as it has been manifested, you may no longer stand in doubt as to your relationship with God, as to your personal acceptance. He so puts this righteousness at your disposal that you may come to Him in confidence, using it as if it were entirely your own. IV. Fourthly, This righteousness is a righteousness to which the law and the prophets bear witness. By this expression, we understand the whole of the Old Testament. It is not something (he means to tell us) now come to light for the first time, not understood in the ages gone by; it is something which has been proclaimed from the beginning hitherto. To these oracles the eye of every saint, from Abel downward, has been directed; on this righteousness the feet of every saint from the beginning have stood; of this righteousness every prophet has spoken; to this righteousness every type has borne witness; and this righteousness every sacrifice has set forth. It is this Star which shone down upon the pilgrimage of Old Testament worthies, and in the light of which they walked. It is this Star which sheds light on every page of their history; it was to this Star that they, with one consent, age after age, pointed the eye of all around. They knew none but this; they cared for none but this; to them, as to those who believe now, Christ was all and in all On this righteousness they rested, in it they rejoiced. It is no new righteousness which we preach. It is no new foundation of which we tell. It is the old one, the well-proved one. It has been abundantly sufficient in past ages, and it has lost none of its efficiency now in these last days. It was enough for the saints in former ages, it is enough for us now. They who found salvation, ages and generations ago, found it here; and he who finds salvation now finds it also here. V. Fifthly, This righteousness is a righteousness which is by the faith of Jesus Christ: Even the righteousness of God, which is by the faith of Jesus Christ, unto all, and upon all them that believe; for there is no difference. He means to say by this expression, that it is a righteousness which comes to us by believing in Jesus Christ. It is not our faith that is our righteousness; it is not our act of believing that justifies. If your faith were your righteousness, then faith would be just reduced to the level of all other works, and would be itself a work. If it were our faith, our act of faith, that justified, then should we be justified by our own acts, by our own deeds. The expression, then the righteousness of God, which is by faith of Jesus Christ, means simply that it is a righteousness which passes over to us, and becomes available for us, by believing in Him whose righteousness it is; that is, by believing the Fathers testimony concerning Jesus Christ. It is by believing that we are identified with Him, so that His doing becomes our doing in the eye of God, and in the eye of the law; His suffering becomes our suffering; His fulfilling of the law becomes our fulfilling of the law; His obedience to the Fathers will is our obedience to the Fathers will. Such is the position into which we are brought by being made, in believing, one with Him. Thus the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ, is presented to us, that in believing on Him, He may become ours. Righteousness is here laid down at our feet. It is there, whether we receive it or not. It is there, whether we believe it or not; whether we reject it or receive it. Your receiving it does not create it; your receiving it does not complete it; it is all created, it is all completed, it is all free, it is all at our feet, whether we take it or thrust it away; and our condemnation hereafter, if we be lost, will be not that there was no righteousness, not that we refused to complete a righteousness which had been begun, but that we rejected the righteousness which was completed, and which was so presented to us by God himself. It is in believing, or, as the apostle expresses it, by faith in Jesus Christ, that this righteousness, with all its privileges, and with all its results, passes over to us. For in believing, what are we saying but just this: I have no works to bring to God; I am a sinner, but I take this work of the Son of God, and I ask to be dealt with by God according to its value, and just as if I had done the work, and not He. Or, it is just as if we were saying, I have no righteousness, seeing I am wholly a sinner; but I take this righteousness of the Son of God, and I draw near, expecting to be treated by God, just as if I and not He were the righteous person. I cannot present any suffering to Him in payment of penalty; bat I take this suffering of the Son of God, and I claim to have it reckoned to me as payment of my penalty. Thus it is, Christ is the end of the law, for righteousness to every one that believeth. VI. Sixthly, This righteousness is a righteousness for the unrighteous. It is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe; for there is no difference: for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God. It is righteousness for the unrighteous. It is not righteousness for the good, but for the evil. It is not righteousness for the worthy, but for the unworthy. It is our unrighteousness that fits us for this righteousness. It is the evil that is in us that fits us for the excellency that is found in it. How foolish, then, to say as men, when convinced of sin, or when going back into former iniquity, are sometimes found saying, I am too great a sinner to be for given. Why, if you were not such a sinner, you would not need such a righteousness. It is the extent of your unrighteousness that fits you for a righteousness so infinite, so divine. If the righteousness were not the righteousness of God, if it were a human and not a divine righteousness, if finite and not infinite, your fear would be natural; but seeing it is divine not human, infinite, not finite, can anything be more foolish, more presumptuous, more profane, than to say, My unrighteousness is too great for the righteousness of the Son of God? This righteousness for the unrighteous is said by the apostle to be unto all. It is a righteousness which is like the sun in the heavens. It is one sun; yet it is enough for every one, it is free to every one. God works out a righteousness, and then sets it down on this fallen earth, that every one may avail himself of it. We are, therefore, not to say, Is this righteousness provided for this one or for that one, for many or for few? but there it is, there is the righteousness, go and take it. That is the gospel. Looking at the natural sun, do you ever think of asking, Is it for me, for this man or for that, the many or the few? You open your eye and enjoy its beams without asking any questions. Your making such inquiries would indicate a very unhealthy state of body; and so your asking such questions regarding Gods intention as proposed in this righteousness, indicates an unhealthy state of mind. To every sinner here, we preach the good news of this righteousness; a righteousness not only suitable and sufficient, but glorious and free; righteousness for the unrighteous; righteousness for the most unrighteous of the children of men. Again, it is a righteousness which is upon all them that believe: It is unto all; but it is only upon them that believe. The moment that we believe through grace, we are accepted in the Beloved, redeemed from condemnation and from wrath. Till then the wrath of God abideth upon us. It is in believing that this righteousness is put upon us; and in believing what? In believing what God has testified concerning this righteousness, and concerning Him whose righteousness it is. Again, the apostle affirms regarding this righteousness for the unrighteous, that there is no difference, for all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. There is no difference as to its fitness for the sinner, whatever his sin may be; and there is no difference as to the fitness of the sinner for the righteousness. There is this twofold fitness: the fitness of the righteousness for the sinner, and the fitness of the sinner for the righteousness. There is no difference; there is no man more fit than another; all are equally fit or equally unfit, equally qualified or equally unqualified, for all have sinned; and it is this that brings down all to the same level, and down to this level it is that the righteousness comes. For it is not a righteousness which has only come down to a certain level,which has lighted upon earth, but only upon some of its highest peaks; it is a righteousness which has come down to the very lowest valleys, a righteousness which may be found out without climbing, and even beside our very dwellings. No one, then, can say, I deserve it, therefore it is for me; and no one, on the other hand, can say, I do not deserve it, therefore it is not for me. There is no difference, for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God. Thus it suits the case of all; so that no one can put it away, and say, It does not suit my case, but it may suit others. Nay, friend, if you are not an unrighteous man it will not suit you, I grant; but if you are an unrighteous man it must suit you. There is no question as to the kind of your unrighteousness, the length of time, the amount or degree; there is no question about that, the simple question is, Are you an unrighteous man? Then it suits your case. And it is a righteousness near to each one of you; it is not afar off: it is not in heaven above, so that you have to climb to the seat of God to obtain it; and it is not down so low that you must dig to earths center to find it: it is near, it is at your very side; and if you reject it, it cannot be because of its distance. God has brought it near. He ells you it is near. I bring near my righteousness. God says that; and who are you that you should say, It is far off? Nay, more, it is free,Without money and without price. There is no payment asked; no payment can be taken. The very idea of payment is insulting to the righteousness, and insulting to Him whose righteousness it is. Yet many seek to buy it,not perhaps by their gold and silver, but by other things equally worthless. Some would buy it by their penances and fastings, some by their confessions; some would buy it by their repentance, some by their prayers, some by their self-mortification and privations, some by their fair lives and excellent deeds. It is righteousness for the unrighteous that we proclaim, the righteousness of God, a righteousness which has come down from heaven to earth on very purpose that it may be presented to you. It is Gods wish that you should take it. Do you refuse it? He hinders not. Where then lies the hindrance? In you, not in Him. The refusal will not be on His part; it must be on yours; and if you perish, you perish, not because He would not be reconciled to you, but because you would not be reconciled to Him; not because there was not a provided righteousness, but because you rejected it; not because there was not sufficient love in God to give you that righteousness, but because you willfully put away from you both the righteousness and the love. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 29, 2011

Lords Day 36, 2011

Sunday··2011·09·04
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Riches of Gods Word Samuel Stennett (17271795) Let avarice, from shore to shore, Her favorite god pursue; Thy word, O Lord, we value more Than India or Peru. Here mines of knowledge, love, and joy, Are opened to our sight; The purest gold without alloy, And gems divinely bright. The councils of redeeming grace, These sacred leaves unfold; And here the Savior’s lovely face Our raptured eyes behold. Here, light descending from above Directs our doubtful feet; Here, promises of heavenly love Our ardent wishes meet. Our numerous griefs are here redrest, And all our wants supplied; Nought we can ask to make us blessed, Is in this book denied. For these inestimable gains, That so enrich the mind, O may we search with eager pains, Assured that we shall find! Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 19 For the anxious longing of the creation waits eagerly for the revealing of the sons of God. 20 For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of Him who subjected it, in hope 21 that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. 22 For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now. 23 And not only this, but also we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body. Romans 8 When the night is darkest, and the stars are hidden, and the clouds are black, then we think most of the clear fair day, and long for its dawn. When the storm is roughest, with the waves and wind roaring round the labouring vessel, then we are troubled, and look eagerly out for the glad and sunny calm. When winter binds earth in its chain of frost, and wraps it in snow and ice, then we begin to ask for spring, with its flowers, and songs, and verdure. So with the saint, as represented by the apostle here. This is night, and storm, and winter to him; he is ever thinking of the day, and the calm, and the spring. Like one sitting amid the ruins of the earthly Jerusalem, lie sighs for the glory of the heavenly city. From banishment she more and more, Desires to see her country dear; She sits and sends her sighs before, Her joys and treasures all be there.(Old Hymn.) The weariness, and conflict, and sufferings of this present life, call up in the apostle the wonderful thoughts contained in these verses relating to creation and to the Church of God, to the wretchedness of this evil world and groaning earth, and the perfection of that world that is to come,that new earth wherein dwelleth righteousness. We thus interpret the whole passage, beginning, as it ought, at the middle of the seventeenth verse:If indeed we suffer together, it is that we may be also glorified together; for I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory about to be revealed in us, (which reaches towards us, ??). For the earnest expectation of creation waiteth for the revelation of the sons of God; for creation was subjected to vanity, not willingly, but on account of the subjecter (God), who (for His own purposes), hath subjected it in hope, because creation itself shall be delivered from the bondage of the corruption into the liberty of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans together and travails together until now. And not creation only, but we ourselves also, (although) possessing the first fruit of the Spirit, (the Spirit as a first fruit), even we groan in ourselves, waiting for the adoption, that is, the redemption of our body; for (moreover) by this hope we are saved; (the things of this hope are no doubt unseen, otherwise it would not be hope) but a hope that is seen is not a hope. But if we do not see, and yet hope, then we wait in patience. Such is the meaning of the passage; let us now learn in detail what the apostle reveals as to creation, and as to the church. I. Creation. Here (as in Matthew 10:6, from the beginning of the creation,) (the word signifies the earth and the fullness thereof (1 Corinthians 10: 26), or that which the Holy Spirit describes in the first chapter of Genesis, and pronounced good and very good. For matter (no less than spirit) is Gods handiwork, and therefore precious in His sight. Let us read and understand Genesis 1; Psalms 8:19, 148:; Proverbs 8. (1.) Its subjection to vanity. Vanity means that which is vanishing, liable to change and decay, vanity of vanities. It means evil in opposition to good, emptiness in contrast with fullness. This material creation was made good and stable; but mans sin let in evil upon it, brought on it the curse, made it crumble down and wither, till it not only decays and waxes old, but is ready to vanish away. To this vanity the Creator has subjected it, in consequence of its connection with man: Cursed is the ground for thy sake (Genesis 3:17). This passage in Genesis contains the act or sentence of subjection, as putting it under the power of vanity,decay, corruption, disease, death. Not its own sin but mans was the cause: for thy sake.[8] (2.) Its earnest expectation. The word signifies the eagerness expressed by the head bent forward and the neck outstretchedintense and anxious longing. Such is the feeling figuratively ascribed to creation, as in Psalm 96:2, when it is called on to be glad, and rejoice, and clap hands, in expectation of its coming Deliverer and King. This, then, is creations attitude as seen and interpreted by God. He looks down on creation, and regards it as expecting, waiting, watching, longing, just as He is said to hear the cry of the young lions for food. (3.) Its groans and travail-pangs. It is hike a sick man racked with pain, and crying out for relief; it is as a woman in labour, suffering the pains of childbirth, and longing for the moment when she shall be delivered. All nature sighs as if conscious of imperfection, as if bowed down under the curse. Blight, decay, death, storms, earthquakes, lightnings, are all the groans of creation, and perhaps still more, the sufferings of the beasts of the field, and fowls of the air; for their case seems unspeakably sad, suffering at the hands of man in a thousand ways not by any fault of their own. Perhaps also the labour pangs of earth may not simply be to shake of the corruption with its bondage; but especially to be delivered of the millions and millions of bodies which it contains. Does it not travail in pain to be delivered of the dust of the saints which it has carried in its womb for ages? and of earth also shall it not be said, in the beauties of holiness from (more than) the womb of the morning thou hast the dew of thy youth (Psalm 110:3)? (4.) Its deliverance. This is the day of creations bondage, in which corruption (the corruption or old curse) holds it; the day of its liberty,the liberty of the glory,is coming, the times of the restitution of all things; the revocation of the curse; the bestowal of the long deferred blessing; the renewal of the heavens and earth which are now. Creation is represented as knowing this its glorious destiny, and looking forward to it, as simultaneous with the manifestation of the sons of God, the day when these sons shall shine forth in the kingdom of their Father; for, when He who is our life shall appear, then shall we also appear with Him in glory. Thus all creation looks forward to its perfection, groaning under imperfection; anticipating the new heavens and new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness. Bright hope! Sweet consolation to us when moving about each day amid the vanity of a sin-laden earth, and listening to its groans and pangs! Rest for a weary world, tarry not! Earths days of weariness are now drawing to a close. These long ages of suffering and vanity have surely been enough to demonstrate the exceeding sinfulness of sin. II. The church. It is described as we who have the first fruits of the Spirit,as the sons of God. It is composed of the redeemed from among men from him by whom the curse and the vanity were brought in, to the last of His redeemed sons; a glorious church,whose members are heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ,the general assembly and church of the firstborn,Gods kings and priests, prepared for His everlasting kingdom. What, then, says the apostle here of this churchof its present and its future. Mark, (1.) Its sufferings. He calls them the sufferings of this present time; sufferings with Christ, as well as sufferings for Christ. There are fightings without, and fears within; enemies all around; tribulation on every hand,in body, and soul, and spirit; weary limbs, weeping eyes, drooping hands, feeble knees, fainting spirits, aching heads, broken hearts: even when outward persecution assails not. Through much tribulation we must enter the kingdom of God. I fill up that which is behind of the sufferings of Christ. (2.) Its groans. We ourselves groan within ourselves, sometimes articulately, and sometimes with the groanings that cannot be uttered. As Jeremiah says, Our sighs are many, and our heart is faint. The churchs groans are in unison and sympathy with a groaning creation. An absent King, a present usurper, a cursed soil, overflowing evil, disease, sorrow, death: these make it groan even in the midst of its joy unspeakable. (3.) Its waiting. Waiting,patient waiting,hoping,this is the churchs attitude, in harmony with creation. The feeling and attitude of the church intimates that the inheritance is yet to come. Not now, not yet; but soon and surely; therefore we wait, may be said to be its language. It waits now, in accordance with the saints of all ages past, for deliverance from the bondage of the corruption, and for the liberty of the glory, for the reversal of all the evil which the first Adam introduced, and for the in bringing of all the good and the glory which the second Adam has purchased. (4.) Its adoption. Even now are we the sons of God; we have already received the Spirit of adoption, crying, Abba, Father. But as it was resurrection that manifested (Romans 1:4) Christs own Sonship (though He was the eternal Son), so by resurrection is our sonship or adoption to be manifested. The day of adoption is here called the day of the redemption of the body. For this fullness of divine, and visible, and proclaimed adoption, we wait in hope and patience. (5.) Its manifestation. It doth not yet appear what we shall be. As Christ is hidden, so are we just now. We are sons, and kings, and heirs, in disguise. But the day of revelation comes; when He who is our life shall appear, we shall appear with Him in glory. If we suffer, we shall also reign with Him. The day of His recognition and crowning shall be ours also. (6.) Its liberty. In one sense we are free, Christ bath made us free. In another, we are sharers of the bondage of the corruption; we groan within ourselves; we cry, O, wretched men, who shall deliver us; we are carnal, sold under sin. The day of full freedom is at hand, eternal and glorious. (7.) Its glory. This is the glory to be revealed; it is the day of the glory for heaven and earth, of which it is said, The wise shall inherit glory,Christs glory, the churchs glory, creations glory,glory such as that described in the two last chapters of Revelation, an exceeding and eternal weight of glory. See then, 1. The power and poison of sin. It was one sin that ruined man, and marred creation, and introduced death. The effects of that one sin are still felt; they have lasted nearly six thousand years, and are as terrible as ever. What must sin be! 2. The completeness of the deliverance. Not man only, but mans earth, shares this; not mans soul alone, but mans body too; it will be the undoing of the wrongs, and sorrows, and groans, of ages. The second Adams triumph will be complete. His blood will not only give white raiment to His saints, but will wash creation white. 3. The unbelieving mans loss. He loses his soul; he loses heaven, and God, and glory, and the resurrection unto life; the incorruptible inheritance; the blessedness of the eternal rest, and the liberty of the glory, the joy and brightness of the manifestations of the sons of God. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 36, 2011

Lords Day 40, 2011

Sunday··2011·10·02
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. The Efficacy of Gods Word Philip Doddridge (17021751) With reverend awe, tremendous Lord, We hear the thunders of Thy Word; The pride of Lebanon it breaks; Swift the celestial fire descends, The flinty rock in pieces rends, And earth to its deep centre shakes. Arrayed in majesty divine, Here sanctity and justice shine, And horror strikes the rebel through, While loud this awful voice makes known The wonders which Thy sword hath done. And what Thy vengeance yet shall do. So spread the honors of Thy name; The terrors of a God proclaim; Thick let the pointed arrows fly, Till sinners, humbled in the dust, Shall own the execution just, And bless the hand by which they die. Then clear the dark tempestuous day. And radiant beams of love display; Each prostrate soul let mercy raise; So shall the bleeding captives feel, Thy word, which gave the wound, can heal, And change their notes to songs of praise. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 37  But in all these things we overwhelmingly conquer through Him who loved us. Romans 8 Within the six verses preceding this, we have no less than six most striking questions; some apparently abrupt, but all of them very expressive: (1.) What shall we say to these things? (2.) Who can be against us? (3.) How shall He not give us all things? (4.) Who shall lay anything to the charge of Gods elect? (5.) Who is he that condemneth? (6.) Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? At the close of these questions mention is made of seven evils, all which were more or less the portion of the saints: (1) tribulation; (2) distress; (3) persecution; (4) famine; (5) nakedness; (6) peril; (7) sword. And to shew that such was the lot of the saints even under the New Testament, Paul quotes a psalm referring to Old Testament saints, thus assuming the oneness of the church in all ages, even in suffering and in consolation; the oneness of the church in battle and in victory. One faith, one covenant, one blood, one church, from the beginning! Here are two things: (1) the victory; (2) How to win it. I. The victory. Our life is a warfare. (1.) The good fight. It is to battle that the church is called; not to a mere parade, or review, or display of arms; each saint is to war a good warfare; for the moment we take our stand on Christs side, our enemies gather to the assault. (2.) The victory. Conquerors! Yes; not merely warriors but conquerors. This verse links itself with the seven promises to the seven conquerors in the churches of Asia. To him that overcometh, is the message sent. (3.) The abundant victory. For this is the meaning of the word (Č???錺?). It corresponds to Peters expression as to the abundant entrance into the kingdom (2 Peter 1:2). It is not a mere victory, no morea bare overthrow of the enemies, but a complete and glorious victory. It is not being saved so as by fire,mere salvation and nothing beyond, but a marvelous and perfect salvation. Yes, that which we win is an abundant victory. (4.) The victory over all the sevenfold evils. We are made to triumph over them,every one of them. They assail us, we meet them face to face. Each is in itself an evil, a sorrow, a pang; or rather a series,a long series it may be of such,but over each of them in succession we triumph: Thou shall tread upon the lion and the adder, the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under foot (Psalm 91:13). Thus evil becomes good, and time bitter sweet. (5.) The victory through means of these sevenfold evils. For this I suppose to be the real point of the passage;Nay, it is in all these things (or rather by means of as ? very often signifies), that we win an abundant victory. We not only conquer these, but we take them up and make use of them as our weapons for overthrowing our other enemies. These seeming evils are the very instruments of victory. They seem dragswe make them ladders for ascending, wings for raising us above things seen and temporal. Thus we glory in tribulations (Romans 5:3). This is the last and noblest use of trial; which we are apt to lose sight of. It is not always easy thus to use tribulation, and to convert it into a means of triumph; yet certainly it is to this that we are called. Say not, I will submit, I will not murmur, I will try to fight. All this is right; but thou art called to much more than this. So use thy sorrows as to make them the very means of conquer; so use them, as that thou shalt say at last, Had it not been for these tribulations my victory had been a poor one,but half a victory; thus out of the eater there shall come forth meat, and out of the strong shall come forth sweetness. We must learn how to use affliction; not passively, but actively; nay, aggressively. II. The way in which it is won. Through Him that loved us,yes, Him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in His own blood. (1.) He provides the strength. Weakness is ours; and we begin time fight with the acknowledgment of this. But all power is given to Christ for us; and out of that fullness of power we receive. The power of Christ rests (pitches its tent over us), on us (2 Corinthians 12:9): My strength is made perfect in weakness; so that when we are weak then we are strong. Anothers strength, as well as anothers righteousness, is placed at our disposal. (2.) He provides the weapons. Our weapons are from a divine arsenal,the tower of David builded for an armory. Spear, sword, buckler, girdle, and helmet, are all of His making and bestowing. (Ephesians 6:11-15.) (3.) He provides the battlefield. The skillful general chooses his battlefield. So does our Captain. It is not the choice of the enemy; or of self; still less is it taken up at random, or by chance. It is carefully selected by Him that loved us. The time of battle, the nature of the battle, the duration of the battle, the intensity or peculiarity of the assault, all these are chosen by Him. Each sorrow, each tribulation, each peril, is of His appointment in every item and detail. (4.) He provides the battle cry. As at Trafalgar, the word that Nelson sent through each vessel and every heart, was, England expects every man to do his duty; so our Captain gives His battle words. They are such as these: The love of Christ constraineth us; Who is he that condemneth? fight the good fight of faith; behold I come quickly. (5.) He provides the rewards. Of these, seven are named in the epistles to the Asian churches. These are representative rewards, as the churches are representative churches. Each reward is glorious; and each corresponding with the battle and the victory. O Christian! fight bravely. Face every enemy, small or great. Turn the guns of the enemy against himself. Seize the hostile batteries, and man them. It is an evil day; a day of yielding and compromise. Stand fast in the faith, and in the Lord. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. 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continue reading Lords Day 40, 2011

Lords Day 47, 2011

Sunday··2011·11·20
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Ministers a Sweet Savor, Whether of Life or Death Philip Doddridge (17021751) Praise to the Lord on high, who spreads his triumphs wide! While Jesus fragrant name is breathed on every side. Balmy and rich, the odors rise, And fill the earth, and reach the skies. Ten thousand dying souls, its influence feel and live; Sweeter than vital air, the incense they receive: They breathe anew and rise and sing Jesus the Lord, the conquering King. But sinners scorn the grace that brings salvation nigh; They turn their face away, and faint, and fall, and die. So sad a doom, ye saints, deplore, For, Oh, they fall to rise no more. Yet, wise and mighty God, shall all thy servants be, In those who live or die, A savour sweet to thee; Supremely bright, Thy grace shall shine, Guarded with flames of wrath divine. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 20  The God of peace will soon crush Satan under your feet. Romans 16 Let us note here, I. Satans overthrow. The whole history of the world is interwoven with the doings of him whom Scripture calls the serpent (2 Corinthians 11:3); the old serpent (Revelation 12:9); the God of this world (2 Corinthians 4:4); the great dragon (Revelation 12:9); the wicked one (Matthew 13:19, 1 John 5:18) ; the devil (Matthew 4:8); the prince of the power of the air (Ephesians 2:2); the accuser of the brethren (Revelation 12:10); the adversary (1 Peter 5:8). He is a living person,originally connected with heaven, now with earth, once associated with angels, now with men, full of malice, a murderer and a liar, a deceiver. His dealings first with Eve, and then with Christ, are the two great specimens of his nature, his tactics, and his aims. The first promise announced a battle between him and the seed of the woman. This battle has been going on without intermission, between him and Christ, and between him and the members of Christs body. With them it is warfare, with the rest of mankind it is friendship. The warfare has been fierce as well as long, open as well as secret, outward as well as inward. In all his assaults and stratagems he has to a certain extents succeeded, but always in the end been baffled. It is to this ultimate baffling or bruising that the apostle here alludes. In four ways has this final bruising been manifested, or is to be manifested: (1.) In Christ Himself. He seemed for a while to conquer; he succeeded in stirring up men against Him; Judas to betray Him, and His disciples to forsake Him. He specially seemed to triumph over Him on the cross. There He bruised his heel. But that was the means and commencement of his defeat. His bruising began at the cross. There he received his deadly wound, his death stroke, which is to be completed at His second coming. Christs personal victory over Satan by Himself and for Himself is yet to be manifested. (2.) In the Church. Satan has bruised the churchs heel, but the church is yet to bruise his head. Each age of the church has shewn this double process more or less; but the last age is to shew it fully; when Christ comes to deliver her from her oppressor forever. (3.) In each saint. We wrestle with principalities and powers. Each of us has a daily battle with Satan. In this we are often worsted, yet in the end we overcome. We resist, and he flees from us. We pursue, and the God of peace enables us to overtake him and to bruise him under our feet. (4.) In the world. He is prince of this world, and he has long exercised dominion therein. But the day is coming when he will be bound with the great chain and cast into the bottomless pit,and after that into the lake of fire. That shall be his final bruising and binding; that shall be earths deliverance from his power,the end of the reign of evil, and the beginning of the reign of good and righteousness. II. The saints deliverance. We have briefly alluded to this already; but let us notice still further the peculiar expression used in reference to this. It is evidently of individual Christians that He is speaking when He says, the God of peace shall bruise Satan under your feet shortly. (1.) He shall bruise, that is crush, grind to powder, overwhelm. (2.) Satan, as the adversary, as the tempter, as the inflicter of pain, and him who has the power of death,not merely his head, but himself. (3.) Under your feet. He shall place your feet upon his head and neck, as in the case of a conquered foe,as if you had won the whole battle yourself, and triumphed over the enemy. (4.) Shortly. It will not be a long warfare in any sense. A short work will God make of this. Thus shall the saint be delivered; thus shall he conquer; thus shall he triumph; thus shall all his enemies be put under his feet. It will not be long! Hold fast, O saint; hold out! Resist, contend, use the whole armor, smite with the sword of the Spirit; for no other weapon will avail in the conflict with such a foe. Fight! For God is on your side. III. The victory of the God of peace. It is as the God of peace that He wins the victory for us, and bruises Satan tinder our feet. It is as the bruised one that He bruises. He whom Satan smote, is He who smites Satan. The God of peace has made peace; and having made peace by the blood of His cross, He proceeds to destroy all that had once marred the peace,all His enemies and ours,giving us complete victory and triumph. It is on the basis of the reconciling blood, the peace-giving work on the cross, that the operations against Satan are carried on. It is under the banner of the God of peace that we fight. He is our captain, and the peace which He has made is that which secures the victory to us. We overcome by the blood of the Lamb,the blood that has made our peace. It is the righteous peace made on the cross that makes it a righteous thing in God to bruise Satan under our feet; for, to bruise (or punish) him is one thing, and to do so under our feet is another. It is one thing to triumph over him, and another to make us triumph over him,to make us conquerors,more than conquerors,to make us sharers of the honour and the spoils of victory; for with us He divides the spoil. In fighting for us and with us, God has respect to this blood made and blood bought peace. We in maintaining the fight have our eye constantly on it. We fight and conquer as men who know the God of peace, having believed His testimony to the work which has produced the peace. We fight and conquer as men who have obtained the peace, and by that peace are nerved and animated for the conflict, as men who know that God is with us. The peace within, and the consciousness of friendship with God, emboldens us and rouses usmakes us brave and invincible. What consolation, too, in that word shortly. It will not be long. Take the word as referring to the saints simply, or to the church, the victory is near. Behold I come quickly. Fight on. Resist the devil. Wrestle with the principalities and powers. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 47, 2011

Lords Day 3, 2012

Sunday··2012·01·15
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. A Song of Praise for Gospel ministry Philip Doddridge (16451694) Fair are the feet which bring the news of gladness unto me; What happy messengers are these, which my blessed eyes do see! These are the stars which God appoints for guides unto my way, To lead me into Bethlehem-town, where my dear Savior lay. These are my Gods ambassadors , by whom His mind I know; Gods angels in His lower heaven, Gods trumpeters below. The trumpet sounds, the dead arise, which fell by Adams hand; Again the trumpet sounds, and they set forth for Canaans land. The servants speak, but Thou, Lord, dost a hearing ear bestow; They smite the rock, but Thou, my God, dost make the waters flow. They shot the arrow, but Thy hand doth drive the arrow home; They call, but Lord, Thou doest compel and then Thy guests do come. Angels that fly and worms that creep are both alike to Thee; If Thou make worms Thine angels, Lord, they bring my God to me. As sons of thunder first they come, and I the lightning fear; But then they bring me to my home, and sons of comfort are. Lord, thou art in them of a truth, that I might never stray, The clouds and pillars march before, and show me Canaans way. I bless my God, who is my Guide; I sing in Zions ways; When shall I sing on Zions hill, Thine everlasting praise? Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 17If any man destroys the temple of God, God will destroy him, for the temple of God is holy, and that is what you are. 1 Corinthians 3 The Holiness of Gods Temple. I do not dwell upon the figure or picture which these words suggest. The magnificent emblem here employed is no mere sentimentalism or transcendentalism, but thoroughly practical. It is not for description or painting, but for the guidance of our Christian life, in its common rounds as well as in its nobler elevations and aspirations. Mans symbols are often mere poetry or sentimentalism, Bible-symbols are all practical. These are words of weight and solemnity,Ye are the temple of God; the Spirit of God dwelleth in you; the temple of God is holy; ye are the temple of the living God; A habitation of God through the Spirit; Your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost; Ye are built up a spiritual house; I will dwell in them, and walk in them; We will come unto him, and make our abode with him; His Spirit that dwelleth in you; God dwelleth in him, and he in God. Take the figure in connection with any of the kinds of habitation spoken of in Scripture,(1) the home; (2) the tent; (3) the palace; (4) the temple,it exhibits a most comforting truth to us. To be Gods home or dwelling, His tent or tabernacle, His royal palace, His chosen temple, of which that on Moriah was a mere shadow, how solemn the admonition as to personal holiness conveyed to us by this! In Gods temple there is the blood, the fire, the smoke, the water, the lamps, the incense, the shew bread, the cherubim, the glory,all consecrated things, and all pertaining to what is heavenly! These symbols have gone, but the realities have come, the heavenly things themselves! If, then, we are Gods temple, if even our bodies are temples of the Holy Ghost, what manner of persons ought we to be in all holy conversation and godliness! It is this practical use of the inspired figure or symbol that I wish specially to bring before you. If you are Gods temples, what then? How searching and solemn the question! I. What intimacy with God. Acquaintanceship with Him who has made our heart His home is the least which could be expected. He must be no stranger to us. There must not merely be reconciliation,for that may consist with some degree of distance,but intimacy, peaceful friendship, loving acquaintanceship; He seeing into our heart with all its evil, and we into His with all its goodness, and longsuffering, and paternal, yet holy gentleness and love. If God be our inmate, how intimate ought we to be with Him in all respects; yet with a holy, reverend, solemn intimacy; an intimacy which expels fear, and which yet casts out all irreverent freedom. He asks for entrance, and He asks for intimacy: Behold I stand at the door and knock, &c; We will come unto him, and make our abode with him (John 14:23). Of an old Scottish minister it is said (as the finishing stroke in his character), He was one very intimate with God. So let it be said of us. II. What calmness of spirit. In all false religion there is excitement, in true religion calmness. The more of God, the more of the inner and abiding calm. The coming of the Spirit of God into a soul calms it. The indwelling of God preserves that calm. Man is never more truly and deeply calm than when filled with the Spirit of God. The tendency of much that is called religion in our day is to agitation, bustle, noise, unnatural fervor. In many revival-scenes there has been an amount of excitement which is of the flesh or of Satan; certainly not of God. The presence of Christ in the ship calmed the sea, so His presence in a human heart produces calm; and one evidence of His presence is the tranquility which reigns there. His words, His looks, His presence, all tend to calm, not to excite. The temple of God should be the calmest spot in the universe. No breath, no jar, no ruffle there. No storm, nor earthquake, nor war, nor tumult, can reach it. We see this in Stephen when before the council; his face was like that of an angel. God keeps His temple in perfect peace. III. What solemnity of soul. If God be inhabiting us as His temple we ought surely to be solemn men,called to a solemn life, speaking solemn words, manifesting a solemn deportment. We are not to be austere, sour, morose; these are Satans caricatures of holy solemnity; yet we are to shun flippancy, frivolity, levity in word or deed. Should the worlds rude laughter echo through the aisles of the divine temple? or its uproarious mirth ring through the holy of holies? Should the worlds idle or unhallowed songs be sung under the sacred roof of this living cathedral? Put off thy shoes from off thy feet, is Gods injunction, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground. IV. What recollectedness of thought and feeling. With God dwelling in us, shall we allow wandering thoughts or forgetfulness of the divine presence to prevail. Let us gather up our thoughts, and keep them gathered. Let not the ashes of the sacrifice, or the water of the layer, or the incense of the altar, or the fragments of the shew bread, be scattered to the ends of the earth. Let us be self-recollected in the presence of the holy Inhabitant. V. What spirituality and unworldliness. God is a Spirit, and they who worship Him must worship Him in spirit and in truth. We need no rites, no dresses, no postures, no candles, no crosses,these are the mockeries and gew-gaws of a dark materialism. We need the spiritual heart, shutting out the world from a shrine which Jehovah has entered and made His own. If we are temples of the Holy Ghost, and if His temples are holy, then are not such things as the following shut out? (1.) Vanity. What! Vanity in Jehovahs temple! Vanity of life, or word, or dress, or ornament, or deportment! How inconsistent! If the Holy Spirit comes in, these must go out; if these come in, He must depart. (2.) Pleasure. Can a lover of pleasure be a temple of the Holy Ghost? Can a frequenter of the ballroom, a lover of the dance, a haunter of time theatre, a slave of lust or luxurya pleasure-seeker have God dwelling in him? How do the lusts of the flesh, the lusts of the eye, and the pride of life, suit the songs or the incense of the holy place? (3.) Politics. What have the poor party politics of this world to do with the worship of this glorious temple? Can the smoke and dust of the world commingle with the incense of the golden altar? Shall parties strive for majorities under the very shadow of the cherubim and the glory? (4.) Covetousness. Absorption even in lawful business is inconsistent with our being temples of God. We must have business, but let us take heed how we bring our merchandise into the house of God. Take these things hence, is Gods rebuke to the man who tries to be both a worshipper of mammon and a temple of the Holy Ghost. The Lord of the temple comes with His scourge, sooner or later, to drive the buyers and sellers from His courts. He will not allow it to be a market for merchants, any more than a den of thieves. We have a temple! As the apostle said, We have an altar, so we can say more, We have a temple; nay, we are a temple; nay, we are the temple of the Holy Ghost, the temple of the living God. Not some believers only, who are more advanced than others, but every one who has God for his God, who has credited the divine report to Jesus the Son of God; he becomes a son, an heir, a saint, a temple. Let us not grieve that Spirit whose temple we are. Let us allow Him to fill us wholly, and to cast out all that is unbefitting the holiness and glory of his habitation. If any man defile the temple of God, him will God destroy. Awful words! Let us stand in awe, and seek to live as men who know what it is to be temples of God. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 3, 2012

Lords Day 10, 2012

Sunday··2012·03·04
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. A Song of Praise for Answer to Prayer John Mason (16451694) What are the heavens, O God of heaven! Thou art more bright, more high? What are bright stars, and brighter saints, To Thy bright Majesty? Thou art far above the songs of heaven, Sung by Thy holy ones; And dost Thou stoop and bow thine ear, To a poor sinners groans? God minds the language of my heart, My groans and sighs he hears; He hath a book for my requests, A bottle for my tears. But did not my Saviors blood First wash away their guilt; My sighs would prove but empty air, My Tears would all be spilt. Lord, thine eternal Spirit was My Advocate within: But O, my smoke joined with thy flame, My prayer was mixed with sin. But then Christ was my Altar, and My Advocate above; His blood did clear my prayer, and gained An answer full of love. It could not be that Thou shouldst hear A mortal sinful worm; But that my prayers presented are In a more glorious form. Christs hands took my requests, And turned my dross to gold; His blood put warmth into my prayers, Which were by nature cold. Thou heardst my groans for Jesus sake, Whom Thou dost hear always; Lord, hear through that prevailing name, My voice of joy and praise. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 1For I do not want you to be unaware, brethren, that our fathers were all under the cloud and all passed through the sea; 2 and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea; 3 and all ate the same spiritual food; 4 and all drank the same spiritual drink, for they were drinking from a spiritual rock which followed them; and the rock was Christ. 5 Nevertheless, with most of them God was not well-pleased; for they were laid low in the wilderness. 6 Now these things happened as examples for us, so that we would not crave evil things as they also craved. 1 Corinthians 10 The One Church Of God. The apostles argument here may be thus paraphrased: Moreover, brethren, let me remind you of some well known incidents in the history of our fathers; let me remind you of the cloud and of the sea; how our fathers marched under that cloud, and through that sea; how by that cloud and sea they were pledged to Moses as their leader (as we by the baptismal water are to Christ); how they did all eat the same spiritual meat, and drink the same spiritual drink as we do (in their symbolic manna and water); how all of them were put in possession of the same divine privileges in Christ as we; yet they incurred Jehovahs displeasure, and died in the wilderness. See what happened to them! Be warned. Let us fear, lest a promise being left us of entering into His rest, any of you should seem to come short of it. (See Hebrew 3:719, 4:1, 2.) The passage has many aspects. It brings Christ before us, the same yesterday, today, and forever. It exhibits the church of all ages,its dangers, temptations, apostacies, unbelief, unfaithfulness. It illustrates the divine purpose and plan in the history of Gods chosen and called ones here. The basis of the apostles statement in it is a fragment of Israels history,a history all full of meaning, a history meant for us in these last days, a history which whether in parts or in whole, is a divine picture for the study of the Gentile church, and of every saint in every age. Let us take the passage in its exhibition of the church. I. The oneness of the church. Israel was but a fragment of one great whole, one single vein of Gods infinite mine. Even in Israels days Gentiles were brought into this whole, and became part of the church; but before Abraham was the church of God existed. As Messiah in Isaiah calls the church his body (Isaiah 26:19), so in the Psalms He calls it the church of the saints (Psalm 149:1). One church from the first believing soul down to the last,redeemed from among men; the church of whose members the eleventh of the Hebrews gives us some instances. One, because (1) bought with one price; (2) washed with one blood; (3) clothed with one righteousness; (4) filled with one Spirit; (5) animated with one life; (6) loved with one love. These things belong to the saints of all ages and nations; all one church in Christ. II. The oneness of the bread. It is on bread that this body, the church, is fed and nourished; but this is no earthly bread; no mere manna, nor even corn of Israels fields. It is the true bread; the bread of God; the bread which came down from heaven; the living bread; the bread which Israels manna only figured or symbolized. It is the same bread for all ages and nations; for all churches and all saints: They did all eat the same spiritual meat. The fathers from the beginning had but one table, one feast, one bread. Thus they were nourished up unto life eternal. That which a redeemed sinner is to feed upon must be the same in every age; for that which is to be nourished is the same, the appetite is the same, and the strength and stature into which they are to grow is the same. Sometimes it was typified by the flesh of the sacrifice; sometimes by the shew-bread; sometimes by the manna; sometimes by the fruits of the garden (Revelation 2:7). But all these pointed to the one heavenly bread,Jesus, the Christ of God; to His broken body; to His flesh, which is meat indeed; to His whole person as the very and true bread of God, on which the church has been feeding from the beginning, and will feed to the end. This is the one bread which has satisfied the churchs hunger all along; which sharpens even while it appeases the appetite; which suits itself to the thousand varied cases and constitutions; which creates as well as nourishes spiritual life; which invigorates the churchs strength, and knits together the various members of the one body; producing a unity, and sympathy, and identity between them all which nothing else could do. The bread on which Paul fed is the same on which Abel fed. What a link, what a fellowship is this! The bread on which we feed in these last days is that on which Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Moses, David fed. What a fellowship is this! One body and one bread! Christ the one true bread for the sustenance of the one church; even of all who have been purchased by His one precious blood, and made alive by His one mighty Spirit, the one Spirit of life, the one Spirit of adoption, the one Spirit of grace and of glory. There are not two bodies, but one, so there are not two kinds of bread, but one; and that one suffices for every age. It is everlasting bread. It is the eternal loaf, of which the whole family have eaten, and which yet remains undiminished and unchanged; still capable of feeding millions and millions more. III. The oneness of the water. They did all drink the same spiritual drink. The whole church,all saints; not only Israel, but the saints before Israel, and the saints since these days. They were all baptized into one Spirit, and all drank the one living water, out of the one eternal well. It was not one water for the Old Testament saints, and another for the New; but one for all. There was but one drink that could quench the thirst, and it was supplied abundantly from the beginning. The living water is the Holy Spirit, as we read in John (7:37, 38), where, after recording Christs proclamation of living water in the temple, the evangelist adds, This spake He of the Spirit. It is of this living water that Isaiah speaks (55:1); of it also it is that Jesus speaks to the woman of Sychar; of it also that John speaks in the Revelation (21:6, 22:17). In the passage before us it is specially connected with the Rock. It is not a well, or a river, or a fountain, but a rock,the rock of the desert,and that Rock was Christ. For it is Christ that contains the fullness of the Spirit for us. He is the Rock which holds the water; the Rock which, when touched by the rod of faith, pours forth its riches. One rock and one water from the beginning, for the one body, the one church; the rock of the desert, the rock which stands hard by the mountain of the law, yet which is not of it; the rock beside which faith stands, which faith touches, and which, to such a touch, yields its gushing fullness. Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters! IV. The oneness of the way. It is through the desert. Israels desert was but a type of the churchs. Israels forty years marches and encampments were but specimens and illustrations of ours. Differences there have been and will be; yet substantially the way is the same, the perils the same, the difficulties the same, the sorrows the same. One way! Yes, one way from the first; sure and safe, yet rough, and hard, and dark. That way is not of chance, nor by the laws of nature or society; but directly of divine appointment. Each turn is arranged. Its beginning, duration, course, ending, are all divinely planned. God, in His pillar cloud, is our guide, protector, shade, security, so that we fear no evil. God in Christ is our companion, and friend, and comforter all through. It is His way, not ours; and it is good. We are strangers and pilgrims as were all the fathers,Abraham (Hebrew 11:13), David, all the saints of old (1 Chronicles 29:15). One way! Only one way to the one city for the millions of the saved. While, in one sense, we say that the wilderness is the way, in another, we say that Christ is the way: I am the way. What a truth for our day, when more than ever men are walking in ways of their own, and imagining that these ways are as numerous and as diverse as the feet that tread them, or the vain hearts that devise them. V. The oneness of the discipline. The way is that of discipline and education throughout. The road may be longer or shorter, darker or brighter, still it is on that way that God deals with His own in discipline. As there is a oneness in discipline, so is there a oneness in sin, and backsliding, and unbelief in the tendency to depart from the living God. The discipline is various, yet one; it is suited to the case of each, yet is, up to a certain point, the same in all. The church has always needed this; and the interval between her being called and her reaching the inheritance is the time during which it is exercised. God does it Himself. He appoints it, provides it, carries it out. Each days trials, each days work, each days business, each days crosses, each days cares and burdens,all these are discipline. They are, whether lighter or heavier, the rebukings and chastenings of Him into whose family we have been brought. He proves us, tries us, sifts us, empties us from vessel to vessel, tosses us up and down that the chaff may be blown away. He does not allow us to sit down, and say, This is my rest. He makes us feel that this is not our rest. Satan is here; sin is here; the flesh is here; pain is here; human passions are here; death is here; there cannot be rest. Thus God has dealt in past ages with His one family,His sons and daughters,His church; and thus He deals with them still. Israels discipline in the desert, is the churchs discipline till she enters Canaan. Through much tribulation she must enter the kingdom of heavens one rod, one hand, one wisdom, one love, for the one family, from the first. VI. The oneness of the inheritance. The inheritance is not mentioned in our passage; but it is assumed; for the wilderness does not last forever, and the issue of the churchs pilgrimage is glory. Israels journey was toward Canaan; her hope was the land flowing with milk and honey, and her eye was on that goodly mountain, even Lebanon. All her tribes and families had one hope; and with that one hope in view they pressed forward. So for us there is one hope; the hope of the saints from the beginning; the churchs heritage and kingdom; the glory to be revealed in the day of the Lords appearing. One hope, one recompense, one glory, one kingdom, one inheritance, one eternal throne for herself and for her Lord. An inheritance it is, incorruptible and undefiled; made up of many parts, as we see in the epistles to the seven churches, yet but one, the inheritance of the saints in light; the center of which is the new Jerusalem,the circumference, the illimitable universe of Gods wide and glorious creation. (1.) Learn our fellowship with all saints. Oneness with the church from the first day of salvation is our privilege. We stand side by side with them, see the same sights, hear the same sounds, use the same words, stand before the same altar, eat the same bread, drink the same water. We are made able to comprehend with all saints, what is the breadth and length, what is the depth and height, and to know the love of Christ which passeth knowledge. (2.) Learn the common standing of all redeemed men. Their feet are on the one Rock of Ages. They are washed in the same blood. They are gathered round the one cross of Christ. Not one higher or lower; not the New Testament saints higher than the Old, but all alike occupying the same ground provided for sinners by the one Redeemer of the church. (3.) Learn the strength for a holy walk. There is food provided; there is spiritual drink; there is companionship on the way,all the saints are there; there is Christ himself our guide, keeper, light, life, strength. How inexcusable if we be inconsistent! And what a warning in the case of Israel! With some of them God was not well pleased. They turned aside, they disbelieved His word, they followed idols. Let us take heed. God expects us to be holy; and He has provided for our being so. Onward then, right onward, through rough and smooth, through sorrow and joy, till we rest in Jerusalem. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 10, 2012

Lords Day 18, 2012

Sunday··2012·04·29
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. A Before the Sacrament of the Lords Supper William Burkitt (16501703) This day the Lord of Hosts invites Unto a costly feast; I will take care, and will prepare To be a welcome guest. But who and what am I, O Lord! Unholy and unfit To come within Thy doors, or at Thy table for to sit. Awake repentance, faith, and love; Awake, oh, every grace; To meet your Lord with one accord, In His most holy place. Worldly distraction stay behind, Below the mount abide; Cause no disturbance in my mind, To make my Savior chide. Oh come, my Lord, the time draws nigh, That I am to receive; Stand with my pardon sealed by Persuade me to believe. Let not my Jesus now be strange, Nor hide Himself from me, But cause Thy face to shine upon The soul that longs for Thee. Come, blessed Spirit, from above! My soul do Thou inspire To approach the table of the Lord With fullness of desire. Oh, let our entertainment now Be so exceeding sweet, That we may long to come again, And at Thy altar meet. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). 10always carrying about in the body the dying of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body. 11For we who live are constantly being delivered over to death for Jesus sake, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. 2 Corinthians 4 The Power Of Christs Resurrection. The old warrior, who has passed through many fights, carries about with him his scars, as memorials of his battles, evidences both of danger and deliverance. So Paul said, I bear in my body the marks of the Lord Jesus. He was in deaths oft; alway delivered unto death for Jesus sake; I die daily. The old warrior will narrate to you the history of every wound; pointing to each in succession he will say, this was Waterloo, this was Spain, this was Sebastopol, this was Lucknow. So Paul, pointing to his scars, could say this was Antioch, this was Iconium, this was Lystra, this was Philippi, this was Damascus, this was Jerusalem. Thus he describes his life, in stripes above measure, in prisons more frequent, in deaths oft, &c. (2 Corinthians 11:2327). It is of this constant exposure to death that he is speaking in our text. Every part of his body, from head to foot, bore marks of death; the rods, the stones, the chains, the stocks, these were imprinted on his body; as seals both of death and life. We can imagine, too, his lean, pale, weather-beaten face and form; all telling of his encounters with hardship, danger, death, in an hundred forms. Did all these speak merely of his endurance and bravery and patience and martyr-spirit? No, they told of the life which was sustaining him; a life beyond his own; a life super-human, super-angelic, nay, divine; the life of Christ; a life which sustains and invigorates, not the body only, but the soul as well. It is this life which keeps alive the spark, which a whole ocean with all its storms is seeking to quench. No life, but that of Christthe mighty life of the God-manall-sustaining, irresistible, irrepressible, unquenchable, could accomplish this. It is only such a life that can do battle victoriously with such death as is in us and around us. The life here spoken of is not the substitutional or sacrificial; at least not in the substitutional or sacrificial aspects. It is life as a root, or fountain, or vital power. It is not a life given for us, but a life given to us. It is the life of the risen Christ; resurrection life, His risen life deposited as in a vessel for us, and shewing out all its fullness in the counteraction of the death which is in us, and around us. It is in reference to this life that the apostle reasons, If when we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of His Son, much more being reconciled, we shall be saved by His life; that is, if a dying Christ did so much for us, what will not a living Christ do? Let us look then at this vessel and its contents; this well and its life-giving water. Truly it has been said, Christ is life, others only live. Mark this life of Christ. I. It is large. The vessel is capacious; and its contents are commensurate with its capacity. The amount of life contained in the vessel is infinite; and being infinite, it assures us that no amount of death, or danger, or weakness on our part, can prove too great for it to counteract and overcome. O vastness, O infinity of life, what is there that thou canst not do for us? What is the extent of death, in a human soul or body, when compared with this life divine? Good news indeed! II. It is constant. This life is not fitful. It does not come in tides, ebbing and flowing; nor in seasons, sometimes winter, and again summer; nor in alternations, as day and night. It is continuous, unbroken, ever flowing. It is the river which ceases not. It is the deep well which never runs dry. It is the fresh clear atmosphere which always surrounds us, and which we breathe every moment. It is like Himself, the unchanging one; the same yesterday, today, and forever. O ever-constant life! Ever full and running over! That knowest no drought, no break, no change! Surely we were not meant to be the fitful changeful beings that we are! With such a life, should we not be calm and constant? III. It is free. Priceless in every sense it is. Without price, and beyond price! Free is the word inscribed on this divine vessel. No condition, no merit, no price! The life is a gift; and that gift is absolutely and unconditionally free. All that the vessel contains of life for the dead, or dying, is as free as God Himself can make it. God interposes no limitation, no restriction, no purchase. He who would clog the gift with any price or condition, is a rejecter of the gift, and a disbeliever in the love of the giver. It comes to us without money; we come to it without merit. O life-giving energy of the Son of God, how free art thou! IV. It is suitable. It takes up every act of our being, and extends to every region, every circumstance, of our life. It pours itself into every faculty, and feeling, and organ. It meets us at every point. It brings forth from its unsearchable riches the very things that we require in every exigency. In Pauls case, it was the body that it so specially suited; meeting as by a miracle every emergency of disease or danger; not simply like an impenetrable shield, interposed toward off some mortal stroke, but an inward virtue or power, making the man himself impenetrable and invulnerable; nay, infusing new life where death sought to come. It not merely flings off death, but pours in life; and the man at whom the deadly stroke is aimed, rises not merely unwounded, but quickened, and refreshed! Who is there amongst us whose case is not met by this manifold life? V. It is powerful. Omnipotence is in it. It is not the mere skill of the physician, or the efficacy of his medicines (a thing of experiment or probability). But it is the irresistible power of a divine vitality, which no kind nor amount of creature-death can neutralize or conquer. The power of the life of Christ was that which specially came forth in the history of the apostle, when every step was on the edge of death; so that any one looking at him, and knowing his daily history, would say, his life is a miracle, and what a life must that be which keeps that man alive, which prevents him from going down to the pit! It is life-giving, comforting, reviving, healing power. O mighty life of the risen Christ! O all-quickening, all-invigorating life! What a fountain head of vital power art thou to us still, in this daily battle between life and death! VI. It is available. We might say, it is placed at our disposal, and within our reach. It is not in the heavens, that we should have to ascend thither; it is not in the depths that we should have to dig down thither. It is nigh; it is the nearest thing in the universe; as near as He is in whom we live and move and have our being. How it pours itself into us we know not. It has a thousand channels, and will make itself known in a thousand ways; being administered and applied by the Holy Ghost. It quickens at first; it quickens to the last. It pours itself in through faith; through the word; through prayer; through praise; through the sacraments. We are surrounded by this mighty life. It is within us; it is around us; a well of water springing up into everlasting life. It makes our life a continual resurrection. Like Abraham, we lay our life (as he did Isaac) on the altar; like Abraham, we receive it again from the dead. We live in, and through the living one. Because He lives, we live also. Our life is hid with Christ in God. Christ Himself is our life. Horatius Bonar, Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts & Themes Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 18, 2012

Lords Day 25, 2012

Sunday··2012·06·17
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in Me. In My Fathers house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you. If I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself, that where I am, there you may be also. John 14:13 Christ Present in Faith upon the Gospel Table Ralph Erskine (16851752) Jesus is gone above the skies, Where now we see Him not; And carnal objects court our eyes, To thrust Him from out thought. He knows what wandering hearts we have, Forgetful of His face; And, to refresh our minds, He gave Memorials of his grace. He oft the gospel-table spreads With His own flesh and blood; Faith on the rich provision feeds, And tastes the love of God. While He is absent from our sight, Tis to prepare a place Where we may dwell in heavenly light, Forever near His face. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
continue reading Lords Day 25, 2012

Lords Day 32, 2012

Sunday··2012·08·05
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Jesus answered them and said, Truly, truly, I say to you, you seek Me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate of the loaves and were filled. Do not work for the food which perishes, but for the food which endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give to you, for on Him the Father, God, has set His seal. Therefore they said to Him, What shall we do, so that we may work the works of God? Jesus answered and said to them, This is the work of God, that you believe in Him whom He has sent. So they said to Him, What then do You do for a sign, so that we may see, and believe You? What work do You perform? Our fathers ate the manna in the wilderness; as it is written, He gave them bread out of heaven to eat. Jesus then said to them, Truly, truly, I say to you, it is not Moses who has given you the bread out of heaven, but it is My Father who gives you the true bread out of heaven. For the bread of God is that which comes down out of heaven, and gives life to the world. Then they said to Him, Lord, always give us this bread. Jesus said to them, I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst. But I said to you that you have seen Me, and yet do not believe. All that the Father gives Me will come to Me, and the one who comes to Me I will certainly not cast out. For I have come down from heaven, not to do My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me. This is the will of Him who sent Me, that of all that He has given Me I lose nothing, but raise it up on the last day. For this is the will of My Father, that everyone who beholds the Son and believes in Him will have eternal life, and I Myself will raise him up on the last day. Therefore the Jews were grumbling about Him, because He said, I am the bread that came down out of heaven. They were saying, Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How does He now say, I have come down out of heaven? Jesus answered and said to them, Do not grumble among yourselves. No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him; and I will raise him up on the last day. It is written in the prophets, And they shall all be taught of God. Everyone who has heard and learned from the Father, comes to Me. Not that anyone has seen the Father, except the One who is from God; He has seen the Father. Truly, truly, I say to you, he who believes has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your fathers ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died. This is the bread which comes down out of heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die. I am the living bread that came down out of heaven; if anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread also which I will give for the life of the world is My flesh. Then the Jews began to argue with one another, saying, How can this man give us His flesh to eat? So Jesus said to them, Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in yourselves. He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. For My flesh is true food, and My blood is true drink. He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood abides in Me, and I in him. As the living Father sent Me, and I live because of the Father, so he who eats Me, he also will live because of Me. This is the bread which came down out of heaven; not as the fathers ate and died; he who eats this bread will live forever. John 6:2658 My Flesh Is Meat Indeed Samuel Stennett (17271795) Here at Thy table, Lord, we meet To feed on food divine; Thy body is the bread we eat, Thy precious blood the wine. He that prepares the rich repast, Himself comes down and dies; And then invites us thus to feast Upon the sacrifice. The bitter torments He endured Upon the shameful cross, For us, His welcome guests, procured These heart-reviving joys. His body, torn with rudest hands, Becomes the finest bread; And with the blessing He commands, Our noblest hopes are fed. His blood, that from each opening vein In purple torrents ran, Hath filled this cup with generous wine, That cheers both God and man. Sure there was never love so free, Dear Savior, so divine! Well Thou may claim that heart of me, Which owes so much to Thine. Yes, Thou shalt surely have my heart, My soul, my strength, my all: With life itself I’ll freely part, My Jesus! at Thy call. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Hymn tune: Dundee Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 39, 2012

Sunday··2012·09·23
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. So Jesus said to them, Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in yourselves. He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. For My flesh is true food, and My blood is true drink. He who eats My flesh and drinks My blood abides in Me, and I in him. As the living Father sent Me, and I live because of the Father, so he who eats Me, he also will live because of Me. This is the bread which came down out of heaven; not as the fathers ate and died; he who eats this bread will live forever. John 6:5358 A Song of Praise for the Lords Supper John Mason (16451694) O Praise the Lord! Praise Him, praise Him, Sing Praises to His Name; O, all ye Saints of heaven and earth, Extol and laud the same; Who spared not His only Son, But gave Him up for all, And made Him drink the cup of wrath, The wormwood and the gall. Frail nature shrunk, and did request That bitter cup might pass; But he must drink it off; and this The Fathers pleasure was. Lo, then I come to do thy will, His blessed Son replied; Yielding Himself to God and man He stretched His Arms and died. He died indeed, but rose again, And did ascend on high, That we poor sinners, lost and dead, Might live eternally. Good Lord! How many souls in hell Doth vengeance vex and fear? Were it not for a dying Christ, Our dwelling had been there. His blood was shed instead of ours, His soul our hell did bear; He took our sin, gave us Himself, What an exchange is here! Whatever is not hell itself, For us it is too good; But must we eat the flesh of Christ? And must we drink His blood? His flesh is heavenly food indeed, His blood is drink divine; His graces drop; like honey falls, His comforts taste like wine. Sweet Christ! Thou hast refreshed our souls With thine abundant grace; For which we magnify thy name, Longing to see thy face. When shall our souls mount up to Thee, Most holy, just and true, To eat that bread, and drink that wine, Which is forever new? Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 46, 2012

Sunday··2012·11·11
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. O Lord, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thoughts from afar. You search out my path and my lying down and are acquainted with all my ways. Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O Lord, you know it altogether. You hem me in, behind and before, and lay your hand upon me. Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high; I cannot attain it. Where shall I go from your Spirit? Or where shall I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven, you are there! If I make my bed in Sheol, you are there! If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light about me be night, even the darkness is not dark to you; the night is bright as the day, for darkness is as light with you. For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mothers womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them. How precious to me are your thoughts, O God! How vast is the sum of them! If I would count them, they are more than the sand. I awake, and I am still with you. Oh that you would slay the wicked, O God! O men of blood, depart from me! They speak against you with malicious intent; your enemies take your name in vain. Do I not hate those who hate you, O Lord? And do I not loathe those who rise up against you? I hate them with complete hatred; I count them my enemies. Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting! Psalm 139 Searching and Trying Our Ways Philip Doddridge (16451694) Thy piercing Eye, O God, surveys The various Windings of our Ways; Teach us their tendency to know, And judge the paths in which we go. How wild, how crooked have they been, A Maze of foolishness and Sin! With all the light we vainly boast, Leaving our guide, our souls are lost. Had not Thy mercy been our aid, So fatally our feet had strayed; Stern justice had its prisoners led Down to the chambers of the dead. O turn us back to Thee again, Or we shall search our ways in vain; Shine, and the path of life reveal, And bear us on to Zions hill. Roll on, ye swift-revolving years, And end this round of sins and cares; No more a Wanderer would I roam, But near my Father fix a home. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 1, 2013

Sunday··2013·01·06
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. For we know that the Law is spiritual, but I am of flesh, sold into bondage to sin. For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. But if I do the very thing I do not want to do, I agree with the Law, confessing that the Law is good. So now, no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh; for the willing is present in me, but the doing of the good is not. For the good that I want, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want. But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good. For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin. Romans 7:1425 Mysteries About the Saints Work and Warfare: Sins, Sorrows and Joys Ralph Erskine (16851752) The work is great Im called unto, Yet nothings left for me to do; Hence for my work heavn had prepared No wages, yet a great reward. To works, but not to working dead; From sin, but not from sinning freed. I clear myself from no offence Yet wash my hands in innocence. My Fathers anger burns like fire, Without a spark of furious ire; Though still my sins displeasing be, Yet still I know Hes pleased with me. Triumphing is my constant trade, Who yet am often captive led; My bloody war does never cease, Yet I maintain a stable peace. My foes assaulting conquer me, Yet never obtain the victory; For all my battles lost or won, Were gained before they were begun Im still at ease, and still oppressed; Have constant trouble, constant rest; Both clear and cloudy, free and bound; Both dead and living, lost and found. Sin for my good does work and win; Yet tis not good for me to sin. My pleasure issues from my pain; My losses still increase my gain. Im healed even when my plagues abound, Covered with dust even when Im crowned; As low as death, when living high; Nor shall I live, yet cannot die, For all my sins my heart is sad Since Gods dishonored; yet Im glad Though once I was a slave to sin, Since God does thereby honor win. My sins are ever in His eye, Yet He beholds no sin in me, His mind that keeps them all in store, Will yet remember them no more. Because my sins are great, I feel Great fears of heavy wrath; yet still For mercy seek, for pardon wait, Because my sins are very great. I hope when plunged into despair, I tremble when I have no fear. Pardons dispel my griefs and fears, And yet dissolve my heart in tears. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 8, 2013

Sunday··2013·02·24
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. What is the source of quarrels and conflicts among you? Is not the source your pleasures that wage war in your members? You lust and do not have; so you commit murder. You are envious and cannot obtain; so you fight and quarrel. You do not have because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives, so that you may spend it on your pleasures. You adulteresses, do you not know that friendship with the world is hostility toward God? Therefore whoever wishes to be a friend of the world makes himself an enemy of God. Or do you think that the Scripture speaks to no purpose: He jealously desires the Spirit which He has made to dwell in us? But He gives a greater grace. Therefore it says, God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Submit therefore to God. Resist the devil and he will flee from you. Draw near to God and He will draw near to you. Cleanse your hands, you sinners; and purify your hearts, you double-minded. Be miserable and mourn and weep; let your laughter be turned into mourning and your joy to gloom. Humble yourselves in the presence of the Lord, and He will exalt you. James 4:110 Pride Lamented Samuel Stennett, (17271795) Oft have I turned my eyes within, And brought to light some latent sin; But pride, the vice I most detest, Still lurks securely in my breast. Here with a thousand arts she tries To dress me in a fair disguise, To make a guilty wretched worm Put on an angels brightest form. She hides my follies from mine eyes, And lifts my virtues to the skies; And, while the specious tale she tells, Her own deformity conceals. Rend, O my God, the veil away, Bring forth the monster to the day; Expose her hideous form to view, And all her restless power subdue. So shall humility divine Again possess this heart of mine, And form a temple for my God, Which He will make His loved abode. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 14, 2013

Sunday··2013·04·07
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. Can mortal man be in the right before God? Can a man be pure before his Maker? Even in his servants he puts no trust, and his angels he charges with error; how much more those who dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation is in the dust, who are crushed like the moth. Between morning and evening they are beaten to pieces; they perish forever without anyone regarding it. Is not their tent-cord plucked up within them, do they not die, and that without wisdom? Job 4:1721 The Excellency of Man Laid Low before God Ralph Erskine, (16851752) Shall mortal man, a tainted clod, Boast righteousness divine; Or think He can His Maker, God, In purity outshine? Behold, no trust is put by Him, In yonder glorious race, Of bright immortal seraphim, That stand before His face. Of folly comparative can He His purest angels blame, Who, plunged in His infinity, Before Him blush for shame? And shall vain man, in impure state, His innocence defend? Will He with His Creator great Presumptuously contend? Vile mortal man, a worthless wight, Triumphs but for a day; And but inhabits, for a night, A house of mouldering clay. His strongest lodge, and vital fort, Is founded in the dust, Which, quickly falling, cuts Him short, And disappoints His trust. For but how soon a gnawing worm, Or silly moth assails, The rampart cannot stand the storm, The feeble fabric fails. The sapped foundation every hour Thus piecemeal feels decay; And life even in its blooming flower, Does daily fade away. So fast men perish out of sight, Their pomp that shone before, And once could wonder fond excite, Can raise regard no more. In vain no power and wealth achieved, For help at last they cry; For without wisdom, as they lived, They in their folly die. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lords Day 20, 2013

Sunday··2013·05·19
I was glad when they said to me, Let us go to the house of the Lord. But may all who seek you rejoice and be glad in you; may those who love your salvation say continually, Great is the Lord! Psalm 40:16 God Magnified by Those Who Love His Salvation Phillip Doddridge, (16451694) God of salvation, we adore Thy saving love, thy saving power; And to our utmost stretch of thought, Hail the redemption Thou hast wrought. We love the stroke that breaks our chain, The sword by which our sins are slain; And, while abased in dust we bow, We sing the grace that lays us low. Perish each thought of human pride; Let God alone be magnified. His glory let the heavens resound, Shouted from earths remotest bound. Saints, who His full salvation know, Saints, who but taste it here below, Join every angels voice to raise, Continued, never-ending praise. Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 26, 2013

Sunday··2013·06·30
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” But whatever things were gain to me, those things I have counted as loss for the sake of Christ. More than that, I count all things to be loss in view of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them but rubbish so that I may gain Christ, and may be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own derived from the Law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which comes from God on the basis of faith, that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death; in order that I may attain to the resurrection from the dead. —Philippians 3:7–11 Justification by Faith Alone in Christ’s Righteousness " />Ralph Erskine, (1685–1752) Lord, through thy grace I’ll boast no more, In duties I have done; I quit the hopes I held before, And only trust Thy Son. What was my gain, I for His name, Do now account my loss; My former glory is my shame, I nail it to His cross. Yea, doubtless, I all things esteem But loss for Jesus’ sake, That so I may while found in Him, His righteousness partake. The choicest service of my hands Dares not to face Thy throne; But faith, to answer Thy demands, Can plead what Christ has done. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 32, 2013

Sunday··2013·08·11
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good. For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin. —Romans 7:21–25 " />Indwelling Sin Lamented Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) With tears of anguish I lament, Here, at Thy feet, my God, My passion, pride, and discontent. And vile ingratitude. Sure there was ne’er a heart so base, So false as mine has been; So faithless to its promises, So prone to every sin! My reason tells me Thy commands Are holy, just, and true; Tells me whate’er my God demands Is His most righteous due. Reason I hear, her counsels weigh, And all her words approve; But still I find it hard to obey, And harder yet to love. How long, dear Savior, shall I feel These struggles in my breast? When wilt Thou bow my stubborn will, And give my conscience rest? Break, sovereign grace, O break the charm, And set the captive free; Reveal, Almighty God, Thine arm, And haste to rescue me. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 38, 2013

Sunday··2013·09·22
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” So we have the prophetic word made more sure, to which you do well to pay attention as to a lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star arises in your hearts. —1 Peter 1:19 For the Kingdom of God John Norden (1547–1625) The God of bliss, who faithful is, His sacred Word doth send, To teach us all on Him to call, And to His law attend. His kingdom pure, which shall endure Forever, doth begin In those that know how here below To mortify their sins. And they that will embrace with skill The way that trains to bliss, Shall quickly see that they shall be Reformed from things amiss. O God above, look Thou in love On all that long to see Thy saving health, Thy heavenly wealth, And glorious kingdom free. Thy kingdom show to us below, That wander here awry; Direct our feet, Thy statutes sweet, To us Thy folk decry. Oh, be not slack, but what we lack, With speed let us obtain; For Thou dost feed such as have need, Thou dost no poor disdain. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 44, 2013

Sunday··2013·11·03
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Tremble, and do not sin; Meditate in your heart upon your bed, and be still. —Psalm 4:4 Communing with Our Hearts Philip Doddridge (1702–1751) Return, my roving heart, return, And chase these shadowy forms no more; " />Seek out some solitude to mourn, And Thy forsaken God implore. Wisdom and pleasure dwell at home— Retired and silent seek them there; This is the way to overcome, The way to break the tempter’s snare. And Thou my God, whose piercing eye Distinct surveys each deep recess, In these abstracted hours draw nigh, And with Thy presence fill the place. Through the recesses of my heart My search let heavenly wisdom guide, And still its radiant beams impart, Till all be searched and purified. Then, with the visits of Thy love, Vouchsafe my inmost soul to cheer; Till every grace shall join to prove, That God hath fixed His dwelling there. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 50, 2013

Sunday··2013·12·15
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near. —Hebrews 10:24–25 Blessed Day of God John Mason (1645–1694) Blessed day of God, most calm, most bright, The first and best of days; The laborer’s rest, the saint’s delight, A day of mirth and praise. My Savior’s face did make thee shine; His rising did thee raise; This made thee heavenly and divine Beyond the common days. The first-fruits do a blessing prove To all the sheaves behind; And they that do a Sabbath love A happy week shall find. My Lord on thee His name did fix, Which makes thee rich and gay; Amidst His golden candlesticks My Savior walks this day. He walks in robes, His face shines bright, The stars are in His hands; Out of His mouth, that place of might, A two-edged Sword doth stand. Graced with our Lord’s appearance thus, As well as with His name, Thou mayest demand respect from us, Upon a double claim. This day God doth His vessels broach, His conduits run with Wine; He that loves not this day’s approach Scorns heaven, and Savior-shine. What slaves are those who slavery choose, And garlic for their feast; While milk and honey they refuse, And the Almighty’s rest! This market day doth saints enrich, And smiles upon them all; It is their Pentecost, on which The Holy Ghost doth fall. Oh, day of Wonders, mercy’s dawn, The weary soul’s recruit, The Christian’s Goshen, heaven’s dawn, The bud of endless Fruit! Oh, could I love as I have loved Thy watches heretofore; As England’s glory thou hast proved, Mayest thou be so yet more. This day must I for God appear; For, Lord, the day is Thine; Oh, let me spend it in Thy fear, Then shall the day be mine. Cease work and play, throughout the day, That I to God may rest; Now let me talk with God, and walk With God, and I am blessed. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 6, 2014

Sunday··2014·02·09
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” For where two or three have gathered together in My name, I am there in their midst. —Matthew 18:20 The Pleasures of Worship Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) How charming is the place, Where my Redeemer God Unveils the beauties of His face, And sheds His love abroad. Not the fair palaces, To which the great resort, Are once to be compared with this, Where Jesus holds His court. Here, on the mercy seat, With radiant glory crowned, Our joyful eyes behold Him sit, And smile on all around. To Him their prayers and cries Each humble soul presents: He listens to their broken sighs, And grants them all their wants. To them His sovereign will He graciously imparts; And in return accepts, with smiles, The tribute of their hearts. Give me, O Lord, a place Within Thy blest abode, Among the children of Thy grace, The servants of my God. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 12, 2014

Sunday··2014·03·23
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Then I looked, and I heard the voice of many angels around the throne and the living creatures and the elders; and the number of them was myriads of myriads, and thousands of thousands, saying with a loud voice, “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing.” And every created thing which is in heaven and on the earth and under the earth and on the sea, and all things in them, I heard saying, “To Him who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb, be blessing and honor and glory and dominion forever and ever.” And the four living creatures kept saying, “Amen.” And the elders fell down and worshiped. —Revelation 5:11–14 A Psalm of Praise Richard Baxter (1615–1691) Ye holy angels bright, who stand before God’s throne And dwell in glorious light, praise ye the Lord each one. Assist our song, or else the theme too high doth seem for mortal tongue. Ye blessed souls at rest, that see your Savior’s face, Whose glory, e’en the least, is far above our grace. God’s praises sound, as in His sight with sweet delight you do abound. Ye saints, who toil below, adore your heavenly King, And onward as ye go some joyful anthem sing; Take what He gives and praise Him still, through good or ill, Who ever lives! All nations of the earth, extol the world’s great King: With melody and mirth His glorious praises sing, For He still reigns, and will bring low the proudest foe that Him disdains. Sing forth Jehovah’s praise, ye saints, that on Him call! Him magnify always, His holy churches all! In Him rejoice and there proclaim His holy Name with sounding voice. My soul, bear thou thy part, triumph in God above, And with a well tuned heart sing thou the songs of love. And all my days let no distress nor fears suppress His joyful praise. Away, distrustful care! I have Thy promise, Lord, To banish all despair, I have Thine oath and Word: And therefore I shall see Thy face and there Thy grace shall magnify. With Thy triumphant flock then I shall numbered be; Built on th’eternal Rock, His glory shall we see. The heav’ns so high with praise shall ring and all shall sing in harmony. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 19, 2014

Sunday··2014·05·11
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” You will seek Me and find Me when you search for Me with all your heart. —Jeremiah 29:13 On the Lord’s Day John Mason (1645–1694) Thou spreadest a weekly table, Lord, Where souls may banquet on Thy Word; While means in plenty we enjoy, Let not our souls be parched and dry. We wait here at Bethesda’s pool, Those waters which refresh and cool; We wait, whose souls are scorched with sin, Oh, come, dear Savior, help us in. Thy power and thy grace display, Be Thou amongst us on Thy day; That sinners may observe Thy call, And numerous converts to Thee fall. That those who do Thy footsteps trace, May find all sweetness in thy grace; Oh, may they never more complain That they have sought their God in vain. Thy people at Thy footstool lie, Behold us with a gracious eye; Oh, let our souls with Jesus meet, Our fellowship with Him be sweet. Among Thy people here am I, Lord, let me not be passed by; Let this poor soul with triumph say, “I’ve seen my dearest Lord today.” I sit within Thy temple shade, Oh, let Thy presence make me glad; Love me, my Lord, or else I die, Thy love alone can satisfy. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 25, 2014

Sunday··2014·06·22
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Come and hear, all who fear God, And I will tell of what He has done for my soul. I cried to Him with my mouth, And He was extolled with my tongue. If I regard wickedness in my heart, The Lord will not hear; But certainly God has heard; He has given heed to the voice of my prayer. Blessed be God, Who has not turned away my prayer Nor His lovingkindness from me. —Psalm 66:16–20 King of Glory Nathaniel Vincent (1639–1697) King of glory, King of peace, I will love Thee; And that love may never cease, I will move Thee. Thou hast granted my request, Thou hast heard me; Thou didst note my working breast, Thou hast spared me. Wherefore with my utmost art, I will sing Thee; And the cream of all my heart, I will bring Thee. Though my sins against me cried, Thou didst clear me; And alone, when they replied, Thou didst hear me. Seven whole days, not one in seven, I will praise Thee; In my heart, Though not in heaven, I can raise Thee. Small it is, in this poor sort To enroll Thee; Even eternity’s too short To extol Thee. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 31, 2014

Sunday··2014·08·03
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Therefore, let us fear if, while a promise remains of entering His rest, any one of you may seem to have come short of it. For indeed we have had good news preached to us, just as they also; but the word they heard did not profit them, because it was not united by faith in those who heard. For we who have believed enter that rest, just as He has said, “As I swore in My wrath, They shall not enter My rest,” although His works were finished from the foundation of the world. For He has said somewhere concerning the seventh day: “And God rested on the seventh day from all His works”; and again in this passage, “They shall not enter My rest.” Therefore, since it remains for some to enter it, and those who formerly had good news preached to them failed to enter because of disobedience, He again fixes a certain day, “Today,” saying through David after so long a time just as has been said before, “Today if you hear His voice, Do not harden your hearts.” For if Joshua had given them rest, He would not have spoken of another day after that. So there remains a Sabbath rest for the people of God. For the one who has entered His rest has himself also rested from his works, as God did from His. Therefore let us be diligent to enter that rest, so that no one will fall, through following the same example of disobedience. —Hebrews 4:1–11 A Psalm of Praise for the Lord’s Day William Burkitt (1650–1703) This is the day, the Lord’s own day, A day of holy rest; O teach our souls to rest from sin, That rest will please Thee best. This is the day, Thy day, O Lord, On which Thou didst arise; For sinners having made Thyself A sinless sacrifice. Thou, Thou alone, redeemed hast Our souls from deadly thrall; With no less price than Thine own blood, The purchase of us all. Had Thou not died we had not lived, But died eternally; We’ll live to him that died for us, And praise his name on high. Thou died, and Thou did rise again, And did ascend on high, That we poor sinners, lost and dead, Might live eternally. Thy blood was shed instead of ours; Thy soul our guilt did bear; Thou took our sins upon Thyself; Thy love’s beyond compare. How dear and welcome, Lord, to me Is Thy most holy day! But what a Sabbath shall I keep For evermore with Thee? I come, I wait, I hear, I pray; Thy footsteps, Lord, I trace. I joy to think this is the way To see my Savior’s face. These are my preparation days, And when my soul is dressed, These Sabbaths shall deliver me To mine eternal rest. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 37, 2014

Sunday··2014·09·14
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” For to me, to live is Christ and to die is gain. —Philippians 1:21 The Eternal Sabbath Philip Doddridge (1702–1751) Lord of the Sabbath, hear our vows, On this Thy day, in this Thy house, And own, as grateful sacrifice, The songs which from the desert rise. Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord, we love; But there’s a nobler rest above; To that our laboring souls aspire With earnest hope and strong desire. No more fatigue, no more distress; Nor sin nor hell shall reach the place; No groans to mingle with the songs, Which warble from immortal tongues. No rude alarms of raging foes; No cares to break the long repose; No midnight shade, no clouded sun, But sacred, high, eternal noon. Oh, long-expected day, begin; Dawn on these realms of woe and sin. Fain would we leave this weary road, And sleep in death, to rest with God. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 3, 2016

Sunday··2016·01·17
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” The Lord’s lovingkindnesses indeed never cease, For His compassions never fail. They are new every morning; Great is Your faithfulness. —Lamentations 3:22–23 The Encouragement Young Persons Have to Seek and to Love Christ Philip Doddridge (1702–1751) Ye hearts, with youthful vigor warm, In smiling crowds draw near, And turn from every mortal charm, A Savior's voice to hear. He, Lord of all the worlds on high, Stoops to converse with you; And lays His radiant glories by, Your friendship to pursue. “The souls that longs to see My face, Is sure My love to gain; And those that early seek My grace, Shall never seek in vain.” What object, Lord, my soul should move, If once compared with Thee? What beauty should command my love, Like what in Christ I see? Away, ye false delusive toys, Vain tempters of the mind! ”Tis here I fix my lasting choice, And here true bliss I find. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 9, 2016

Sunday··2016·02·28
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Behold, My Servant, whom I uphold; My chosen one in whom My soul delights. I have put My Spirit upon Him; He will bring forth justice to the nations. He will not cry out or raise His voice, Nor make His voice heard in the street. A bruised reed He will not break And a dimly burning wick He will not extinguish; He will faithfully bring forth justice. He will not be disheartened or crushed Until He has established justice in the earth; And the coastlands will wait expectantly for His law. —Isaiah 42:1–4, cf. Matthew 12:20–21 Early Piety Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) How soft the words my Savior speaks! How kind the promises He makes! A bruised reed He never breaks, Nor will He quench the smoking flax. The humble poor He won't despise, Nor on the contrite sinner frown; His ear is open to their cries, He quickly sends salvation down. When piety in early minds Like tender buds, begins to shoot, He guards the plants from threatening winds, And ripens blossoms into fruit. With humble souls He bears a part In all the sorrows they endure; Tender and gracious is His heart, His promise is forever sure. He sees the struggles that prevail Between the powers of grace and sin; He kindly listens while they tell The bitter pangs they feel within. Though pressed with fears on every side, They know not how the strife may end; Yet He will soon the cause decide, And judgment into victory send. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 16, 2016

Sunday··2016·04·17
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Therefore if you have been raised up with Christ, keep seeking the things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God. Set your mind on the things above, not on the things that are on earth. For you have died and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ, who is our life, is revealed, then you also will be revealed with Him in glory. —Colossians 3:1–4 Vanity of the World Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) In vain the giddy world inquires, Forgetful of their God, “Who will supply our vast desire, “Or show us any good?” Through the wide circuit of the earth Their eager wishes rove, In chase of honor, wealth, and mirth, The phantoms of their love. But oft these shadowy joys elude Their most intense pursuit; Or if they seize the fancied good, There’s poison in the fruit. Lord, from this world call off my love, Set my affections right; Bid me aspire to joys above, And walk no more by sight. O let the glories of Thy face Upon my bosom shine; Assured of Thy forgiving grace, My joys will be divine. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 11, 2016

Sunday··2017·03·12
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” And the city has no need of the sun or of the moon to shine on it, for the glory of God has illumined it, and its lamp isthe Lamb. —Revelation 21:23 The Promised Land Samuel Stennett (1727–1795) On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand, And cast a wishful eye To Canaan’s fair and happy land, Where my possessions lie. O the transporting, rapturous scene, That rises to my sight; Sweet fields arrayed in living green, And rivers of delight! There generous fruits that never fail, On trees immortal grow; There rocks, and hills, and brooks, and vales, With milk and honey flow. All O’er those wide extended plains Shines one eternal day; There God the Son forever reigns, And scatters night away. No chilling winds, or poisonous breath, Can reach that healthful shore; Sickness and sorrow, pain and death, Are felt and feared no more. When I shall reach that happy place, I’ll be forever blest? When shall I see my Father’s face, And in His bosom rest? Filled with delight, my raptured soul Can here no longer stay; Though Jordan’s waves around me roll, Fearless I’d launch away. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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Lord’s Day 17, 2016

Sunday··2017·04·23
I was glad when they said to me, “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Blessed is a man who perseveres under trial; for once he has been approved, he will receive the crown of life which the Lord has promised to those who love Him. —James 1:12 The Blessing of Hope in Death Samuel Davies (1723–1761) Yes ; I must bow my head and die; What then can bear my spirit up? In nature’s last extremity, Who can afford one ray of hope? Then all created comforts fail, And earth speaks nothing but despair; And you, my friends, must bid farewell, And leave your fellow-traveller. Yet, Savior, Thine almighty power Even then can sure support afford, Even then that hope shall smile secure, That's now supported by Thy Word. Searcher of hearts, oh, try me now, Nor let me build upon the sand; Oh, teach me now myself to know, That I may then the trial stand. —Worthy Is the Lamb (Soli Deo Gloria, 2004). Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Please don’t miss worshiping with your local congregation if you can possibly help it. But if you’re in need of a good sermon, try these. Tweets about "sermon from:thethirstytheo" !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");
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